Author Topic: Christian Anthropology  (Read 1196 times)

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Offline Irish45

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Christian Anthropology
« on: September 30, 2013, 11:51:53 PM »
Hell all!


Does any of the kind posters here know of an modern theologians who have written about anthropology and The Human Person from an Oriental perspective?  If you are Eastern Orthodox feel free to chime in as well with Eastern theologians!  Thank you all.

Offline xOrthodox4Christx

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2013, 12:14:40 AM »
Quote
Orthodox Christian anthropology teaches that man was created by God to worship him in communion with him, made in his image to attain to His likeness. All human beings are thus of infinite value, because they bear the indelible stamp of their Creator. All human beings are composed of both a soul and body, which are permanently part of human nature. Man was created sinless, but not perfected, and so though Adam was pure when he was created, he was created as a being of dynamic progress, capable of growing more and more like God.

At the fall of man, Adam and Eve not only sinned in violation of God's commandments, but their ontological state shifted. Their nature was not changed in itself, but the image of God in them became obscured by sin, which is an ontological separation from God. Fallen man is thus not totally depraved, but rather suffers from the disease of sin which renders holiness much more difficult to attain to.

All of mankind suffers from the effects of sin (death, sickness, and all evils), even if a particular individual may theoretically not have committed any personal sins. Guilt does not enter into Orthodox anthropology, since it is essentially a legal category and not directly relevant to the existential reality of man's sin illness. Thus, even if the term original sin is used in Orthodox theology, it is understood not as a transmitted guilt for Adam's sin, but rather as an inherited disease which may be cured in salvation, enabling the Christian thus to return to the dynamic path of growth in God's likeness. (Wikipedia)

http://symeonsjournal.blogspot.com/2006/06/orthodox-christian-anthropology.html

Also, I am reading St. Athanasius' On the Incarnation and it deals with Orthodox Anthropology too, in the light of Christ's incarnation. I recommend it.

I do wish I knew more modern theologians.

I found:

Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement, Oxford University Press, Fr. John Behr

I'm sure Vladimir Lossky has something relative to Orthodox Anthropology in his writings.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2013, 12:24:10 AM by xOrthodox4Christx »
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Offline Sinful Hypocrite

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2013, 02:48:22 AM »
On a different note your greeting made me think about the origin of the word Hello. which as you left out the "o", makes it hell.Maybe it has some basis in history for the word hello? Just wondering.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2013, 02:49:04 AM by Sinful Hypocrite »
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Offline LBK

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2013, 05:05:26 AM »
On a different note your greeting made me think about the origin of the word Hello. which as you left out the "o", makes it hell.Maybe it has some basis in history for the word hello? Just wondering.

Hell and hello are completely unrelated words.
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Offline Romaios

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2013, 05:19:25 AM »
On a different note your greeting made me think about the origin of the word Hello. which as you left out the "o", makes it hell.Maybe it has some basis in history for the word hello? Just wondering.

"Hello" is related to "whole" (Gk. holos/Lat. salvus > salve as a greeting: to be well, not lack anything) and to "hallow" (holy, as in "hallowed be Thy name" or "All Hallows/Saints Day"). 

« Last Edit: October 01, 2013, 05:21:48 AM by Romaios »

Offline Sinful Hypocrite

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2013, 07:03:32 PM »
It is as I have learned since yesterday, controversial as to the origin. Alexander Graham Bell is given credit for making it popular as Hello.

But also there are theories that it was based on less noble ventures, and there was even a movement to change it to Heaven-O.

Found an interesting Article on the subject as pertaining to origin here,http://www.endicott-studio.com/rdrm/forhello.html
The Lord gathers his sheep, I fear I am a goat. Lord have mercy.

"A Christian is someone who follows and worships a perfectly good God who revealed his true face through the life, death and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth.“

Offline Irish45

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2013, 10:48:44 PM »
Thank you all for the replies!  I read them as they came up but I am so bad at replying!  My life has been so busy these days and I just haven't had the energy to will myself to reply.  I am sorry for that.  My three munchkins take it out of me on a daily basis.  Also, sorry about that most sinister greeting!   :o  At least it generated some good discussion on the word "hello"! 

I am in a course at my college right now that's based on the theology of the human person.  I wanted to learn something new but at the same time, helping out my great professor by giving him something fresh to look at.  I always get brownie points when I make a comment about EO or OO.  It makes me look like I know what I am talking about, but in reality almost everything I know is from these boards.  LOL!!! 

I needed to choose a modern theologian; unfortunately the Oriental Orthodox are extremely patristic.  I knew that, but I never realized how patristic they are until I tried to find a modern theologian and came up with a lot of stuff on the church fathers.  This is not an insult, but rather a compliment.  I think its pretty amazing how true to the fathers OO theology is. 

This course has opened me up to a lot of interesting protestant theologians.  Ultimately though, I wen't with a Roman Catholic for my report.  I took a sort of controversial figure as my topic so at least it will be fun and new(for me).  His name is Karl Rahner and he had a big influence (apparently) on Vatican II.

When I come up to my winter break I hope to get some extra free time to read.  With that free time in mind, I propose teh question again, but in a broader sense: Are there any modern OO theologians out their that are worth reading? It would need to be translated in English of course because I am no where near fluent in a second language. 

Thanks again to all the posters on these great forums!  I tend to only lurk here, but believe me I've learned a great deal!

Offline Justin Kissel

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2013, 11:12:30 PM »
Wish I would have seen this sooner, as I have a bibliography drawn up on this subject. Not all of them are directly related to anthropology, but most of them relate closely in some way, and probably 15-20 are directly on topic.

Offline Romaios

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2013, 06:58:14 PM »
This is an EO classic - Panayotis Nellas, Deification in Christ: Orthodox Perspectives on the Nature of the Human Person (I assume this is an English translation of his Zoon theoumenon).

Offline Justin Kissel

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2013, 07:06:13 PM »
(I assume this is an English translation of his Zoon theoumenon).

It is.  (but I hate reading reviews I wrote back in the day. I sound like such an idiot)

Offline Romaios

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2013, 07:12:24 PM »
(I assume this is an English translation of his Zoon theoumenon).

It is.  (but I hate reading reviews I wrote back in the day. I sound like such an idiot)

Believe it or not, that was the better you.  :P :-*

Offline minasoliman

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #11 on: November 30, 2013, 07:50:20 PM »
I pray for the day when a huge collection of the writings of St. Severus may be translated.  One that could deal with Christian anthropology in depth is his Philalethes writings, where he essentially reaffirms the same anthropology of St. Athanasius, based on scholarly readings of these writings.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2013, 07:52:49 PM by minasoliman »
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Offline ialmisry

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #12 on: November 30, 2013, 08:09:27 PM »
Being and Communion-Met. Zizoulas
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline Justin Kissel

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #13 on: November 30, 2013, 08:09:37 PM »
I trimmed down the bibliography I had to 18. Many of the rest of the books were on related topics such as Scriptural interpretation, salvation, etc., or from a non-Orthodox perspective. Anyway, these seemed the most relevant here:

Peter C. Bouteneff - Beginnings: Ancient Christian Readings of the Biblical Creation Narratives
Patout J. Burns - Theological Anthroplogy                
John T. Chirban - Personhood: Orthodox Christianity and the Connection Between Mind, Body and Soul
Olivier Clement - On Human Being: A Spiritual Anthropology          
David Ford - Women and Men in the Early Church: The Full Views of St. John Chrysostom   
Nonna Verna Harrison - God's Many-Splendored Image: Theological Anthropology for Christian Formation   
Met. Hierotheos   - The Person in the Orthodox Tradition            
Panayiotis Nellas - Deification in Christ: Orthodox Perspectives on the Nature of the Human Person
Archbp. Lazar Puhalo - The Creation and Fall                   
Patrick Henry Reardon - Creation and the Patriarchal Histories: Orthodox Christian Reflections on the Book of Genesis   
Fr. John S. Romanides - The Ancestral Sin                  
Christoph Cardinal Schoenborn - Man, The Image of God: The Creation of Man as Good News      
Fr. M. C. Steenberg - Of God and Man: Theology as Anthropology from Irenaeus to Athanasius
Fr. M. C. Steenberg - Irenaeus on Creation: The Cosmic Christ and the Saga of Redemption   
Lars Thunberg - Microcosm and Mediator: The Theological Anthropology of Maximos the Confessor
Lars Thunberg - Man and the Cosmos: The Vision of St. Maximus the Confessor
Gayle E Woloschak - Beauty and Unity in Creation: The Evolution of Life      
John D. Zizioulas - Being As Communion: Studies in Personhood and the Church
« Last Edit: November 30, 2013, 08:10:26 PM by Asteriktos »

Offline minasoliman

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2013, 08:14:27 PM »
Being and Communion-Met. Zizoulas

oh yes...this has been recommended to me, even by fellow Copts...I heard it's probably one of the most important works this century

(I thought it was "Being As Communion")
Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

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Offline Irish45

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Re: Christian Anthropology
« Reply #15 on: December 19, 2013, 03:59:37 AM »
Thank you all for the suggestions!  I wish I had this information earlier in the semester!  I am on winter break now, so I hope to get to at least one of the suggestions but I also have a laundry list of reading I want to catch up on.  Writing a paper on Karl Rahner was the most difficult paper I've written in my life.  Picture theology on LSD and you get his work.  I also disagreed with his work. 

On a side note, if you go to the google play store and type in "theology", a book comes up by an OO bishop.  I have it on my phone, but the title slips my mind right now.