Author Topic: How to write clearly, no-nonense, directly maybe with a bit abrasion  (Read 1083 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Shiny

  • Site Supporter
  • Toumarches
  • *****
  • Posts: 13,265
  • Paint It Red
I struggle with writing direct to the point and using as few words as possible to get my point across.

I would like to get better at this.

Any suggestions?
“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan

Offline Cyrillic

  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 13,686
  • St. Theodoret of Cyrrhus, pray for us!
  • Jurisdiction: But my heart belongs to Finland
Re: How to write clearly, no-nonense, directly maybe with a bit abrasion
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2013, 04:39:48 PM »
Write what you would've written without a word limit. Read it. Scrap everything that's superfluous or not absolutely necessary. Try to put the sentences that are necessary even shorter, for example by changing the word order. Reread it to see if it is readable.

Instead of digressing on a point you could write short, semi-rhetorical questions and let the reader think about them. Thus you'll be able to communicate a lot with just a few words. Try to avoid metaphors, long prologues and the like.

« Last Edit: September 27, 2013, 04:40:03 PM by Cyrillic »

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 35,241
Re: How to write clearly, no-nonense, directly maybe with a bit abrasion
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2013, 04:50:16 PM »
Edit.
"as [you've] informed us that respect chills love, it is natural to conclude that all your pretty flights arise from your pampered sensibility; and that, vain of this fancied preeminence of organs, you foster every emotion till the fumes, mounting to your brain, dispel the sober suggestions of reason. It is not in this view surprising that when you should argue you become impassioned, and that reflection inflames your imagination instead of enlightening your understanding." - Mary Wollstonecraft