OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 02, 2014, 06:22:25 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 »  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Modern Church Fathers  (Read 39223 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #225 on: January 23, 2013, 10:39:09 AM »

The sixth fruit, however, is not easily assimilated by mankind. It demands the supreme sacrifice from a person, as expressed in the Savior’s words to the rich youth, "sell all you have and give the money to the poor . . . then come and follow Me" (Mtt. 19:21). This offering is made through the purification of our souls and bodies from all impurity and stain. It comes through renunciation of father and mother, of all earthy pleasures, of the sinful flesh and the world which is "under the rule of the Evil One" as St. John says (1 Jn. 5:19). This offering is expressed in the establishment of monasteries and cloisters for men and women. It consists in taking on the likeness of the angels. There all the offerings we have enumerated come together as flowers of paradise to form a single bouquet. Word and song, building, remembering the living and the departed, church construction and love for one’s brothers, invocation of the grace of God on the world and the whole universe — all of this is present in its highest form; all is done in a "proper and orderly way" [1 Cor. 14:40] for the restoration of the old man in the new order of the Kingdom of God.

-- Met. Leontius (d. 1965), The Seven Gifts (Source)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2013, 10:55:18 AM by Asteriktos » Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #226 on: January 24, 2013, 07:13:37 PM »

Because theology seeks to proclaim the Gospel in time and space, it has by its very nature a missionary and evangelical quality. This means that Orthodox theology cannot be the possession of a particular people. It is universal in scope, offering the saving and transforming power of Christ’s gospel to all nations. Our history teaches us that as the Church sojourned in time and space, it used the culture of empires and nations to articulate a living theology. This is certainly the method employed by the Church Fathers.  Knowing the language, art, philosophy, literature, science and politics of their time, they were able to convey the gospel to people of varying intellectual and social backgrounds.  They were able to proclaim Christ who is the “same yesterday, today and forever” (Heb.13:Cool using the cultural tools that were at their disposal.

-- Fr. Robert Arida (Source)
« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 07:13:49 PM by Asteriktos » Logged
stavros_388
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic
Jurisdiction: Diocese of Nelson
Posts: 1,217



« Reply #227 on: January 24, 2013, 08:31:57 PM »

"Love your neighbor in the following way: Do not get angry with him and do not bear resentment or a grudge against him. Do not allow yourself to say to your neighbor any reproachful, abusive, sarcastic, or caustic words. Maintain peace with him as far as possible. Humble yourself in his presence. Do not try to have revenge on him either directly or indirectly. Whenever possible, yield to him. Get out of the habit of arguing and quarreling, and reject it as a sign of pride and self-love. Speak well of those who speak evil of you. Pay good for evil. Pray for those who cause you various offenses, wrongs, temptations, persecutions. Whatever you do, on no account condemn anyone; do not even try to judge whether a person is good or bad, but keep your eyes on that one evil person for whom you must give an account before God - yourself."

--St. Ignatius Brianchaninov, The Arena

I should read this everyday... Smiley

Logged

"The kingdom of heaven is virtuous life, just as the torment of hell is passionate habits." - St. Gregory of Sinai

"Our idea of God tells us more about ourselves than about Him." - Thomas Merton
stavros_388
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic
Jurisdiction: Diocese of Nelson
Posts: 1,217



« Reply #228 on: January 24, 2013, 08:59:10 PM »

"Through humility in your dealings with your neighbor, and through love of your neighbor, hardness and callousness is expelled from the heart. It is rolled away like a heavy rock from the entrance to a tomb, and the heart revives for spiritual relations with God for which it has been hitherto dead. A new vista opens to the gaze of the mind: the multitudinous wounds of sin with which the whole of fallen nature is riddled. It begins to confess its wretched state to God and implore Him for His mercy. The heart assists the mind with mourning and compunction. This is the beginning of true prayer."

-- St. Ignatius Brianchaninov, The Arena
Logged

"The kingdom of heaven is virtuous life, just as the torment of hell is passionate habits." - St. Gregory of Sinai

"Our idea of God tells us more about ourselves than about Him." - Thomas Merton
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #229 on: January 26, 2013, 06:05:03 PM »

Some Romish theologians having asserted, in the face of all historical documents, that Chrysostom had appealed to Rome for the purpose of suspending the proceedings against him by the interposition of the papal authority, we will remark, that, according to St. Chrysostom himself, he addressed his protest, not only to the Bishop of Rome, but to other bishops. "I have also addressed this same letter," he says, "to Venerius, Bishop of Milan, and to Chromatins, Bishop of Aquileia." Here is what he asks of his colleagues in the West: " I pray you, therefore, to write letters declaring null and void all that has been done against me, granting me intercommunion with you as in the past, since I am condemned without a hearing, and since l am ready to justify myself before any impartial tribunal."

-- Vladimir Guettée (d. 1892), The Papacy: It's Historic Origin and Primitive Relations With the Eastern Churches (Source)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #230 on: January 27, 2013, 04:12:59 PM »

Every Christian, when faced with an attack on the faith he confesses, is obliged to defend it to the extent of his intellectual ability, not waiting for any special authorization, since the Church has no official advocates.

-- Aleksei Stepanovich Khomyakov (d. 1860), On the Western Confessions of Faith (Source)
« Last Edit: January 27, 2013, 04:13:23 PM by Asteriktos » Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #231 on: January 28, 2013, 06:05:37 PM »

Our ordinary condition, the condition of all mankind, is one of fallenness, of spiritual deception, of perdition. Apprehending—and to the degree that we apprehend, experiencing—that condition, let us cry out from it in prayer, let us cry in spiritual humility, let us cry with wails and sighs, let us cry for clemency! Let us turn away from all spiritual gratifications, let us renounce all lofty states of prayer of which we are unworthy and incapable! It is impossible "to sing the Lord's song in a strange land" (Ps. 136:5), in a heart held captive by passions. Should we hear an invitation to sing, we can know surely that it emanates "from them that have taken us captive" (Ps. 136:3). "By the waters of Babylon" tears alone are possible and necessary (Ps. 136:1).

-- St. Ignatius Brianchaninov (d. 1867), Source)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #232 on: January 30, 2013, 05:59:17 PM »

Cut off from Byzantium, the west proceeded to set up a "Roman" Empire of its own. On Christmas Day in the year 800 the Pope crowned Charles the Great, King of the Franks, as Emperor. Charlemagne sought recognition from the ruler at Byzantium, but without success; for the Byzantines, still adhering to the principle of imperial unity, regarded Charlemagne as an intruder and the Papal coronation as an act of schism within the Empire. The creation of a Holy Roman Empire in the west, instead of drawing Europe closer together, only served to alienate east and west more than before.

-- Met. Kallistos (b. 1934), The Orthodox Church (Source)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #233 on: January 31, 2013, 03:26:49 PM »

On May 25 my wife and I were at Liturgy. Before the Cherubic Hymn a lady passed by where we were standing; she was modestly dressed and led by the hand a boy of about five.  For some reason she attracted our attention.  At the end of the service, before the royal moleben (it was the birthday of the Empress Alexandra), we saw her again as she went to get a candle.

Now that's a servant of God! I thought to myself.  One of her children from his early years and another still in the womb-both are sanctified by the mother's prayers and holy contemplations.  Smart woman!  May the Lord and the Mother of God bless her!

At that moment she approached the icon of the Mother of God "Quick to Hear",  before which we usually stood in the church of the Entrance of the Mother of God into the Temple, and she kneeled down to pray.  By chance I caught sight of her expression, directed at the icon.  And what an expression it was, what faith emanated from it, what love for God, for what is divine, what is holy!...  Oh, if only I could pray like that!  Mother of God, my heart prayed for her, answer her prayers according to her faith!

-- Sergei Nilus (d. 1929), Source
Logged
stavros_388
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic
Jurisdiction: Diocese of Nelson
Posts: 1,217



« Reply #234 on: January 31, 2013, 04:21:02 PM »

"Because the easiest way of practicing unceasing prayer is to pray the Jesus Prayer, a beginner should apply himself to the Jesus Prayer as often as possible. Do you happen to have a moment free? Do not waste it in idleness! Do not waste it by using it for some impracticable and fatuous castle-building, or for some vain and trivial employment! Use it for the practice of the Jesus Prayer."

-- St. Ignatius Brianchaninov, The Arena
« Last Edit: January 31, 2013, 04:50:15 PM by stavros_388 » Logged

"The kingdom of heaven is virtuous life, just as the torment of hell is passionate habits." - St. Gregory of Sinai

"Our idea of God tells us more about ourselves than about Him." - Thomas Merton
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #235 on: February 01, 2013, 06:32:25 PM »

Poverty is not the goal but the beginning point of monastic and ascetical life in early Christianity. Was this a precedent established by St. Antony, a new notion and movement never before contained within Christian thought? Again it is our Lord who establishes the spiritual value of poverty. In the Gospel of St. Matthew (19:21) our Lord commands the rich man who has claimed he has kept all the commandments: "If you will to be perfect, go, sell your possessions and give to the poor ... and come follow me." It was not St. Antony who established the precedent. Rather it was St. Antony who heard the word of our Lord and put it into action, who "did the word of the Lord." It is Christ, the God-Man who has put forth the ideal of perfection, who has commanded us to be perfect (see also 5:48), who has put forth the ideal of poverty as a starting-point for a certain form of spiritual life. Elsewhere in the Gospel of St. Matthew (13:44) Christ makes a similar point, asserting that one sells everything in exchange for the kingdom of heaven. "The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field."

-- Fr. Georges Florovsky (d. 1979), Source
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #236 on: February 03, 2013, 01:34:22 AM »

Because of the character of the principle of sin, perfection in this age is attained to not fully but in part according to the quality of the war carried against the powers of the devil. Good works are not part of a business agreement between God and man whereby God is obligated to reward external and utilitarian acts of charity. Rather good works are the product of the double struggle waged against the devil and for non-utilitarian selfless love for God and the neighbor. Therefore communion of divine life through the human nature of Christ is not enough for salvation. The mystical (sacramental) life is not a magical guarantee of eternal life. Christians must also wage an intense war against Satan. "... if we endure all the assaults of the prince of this world and escape them we shall attain to ( or enjoy) God." (Mag. 1)

-- Fr. John Romanides (d. 2001), The Ecclesiology of St. Ignatius of Antioch (Source)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #237 on: February 06, 2013, 12:14:23 PM »

It is erroneous to think that all Orthodox are in reality not sectarians and that all sectarians are in reality not Orthodox. Not every Orthodox in name is so in spirit, and not every sectarian in name is so in spirit, and, especially at the present time, it is possible to meet "Orthodox" who are in fact sectarians at heart: fanatic, unloving, narrow minded, persistent in human precision, not hungering or thirsting after God’s truth, but gorged with their own presumptuous truth, strictly judging others from the summit of this their imaginary truth dogmatically correct from the outside, but lacking origin in the Spirit. And, conversely, it is possible to meet a sectarian who apparently does not understand the meaning of the Orthodox worship of God in Spirit and in Truth, who doesn’t "recognize" this or that expression of ecclesiastical truth, but who in fact conceals within himself much that is truly divine, who is truly filled with love in Christ, truly a brother to his fellow man.

-- Archbp. John (Shahovskoy) of San Francisco (d. 1989), Sectarianism in Orthodoxy and Orthodoxy in Sectarianism, (Source)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #238 on: February 08, 2013, 07:43:12 PM »

When you are being plagued, never ask what for and why. You will never find that in the Scripture. Instead, it says: "If somebody strikes you on your right cheek, turn the other one to him." It is really difficult to strike one on the right cheek and should be understood as: if somebody starts to denigrate you or provoke you unjustifiably, that will mean hitting you on your right cheek. Do not grumble but bear this blow patiently, and turn your left cheek, that is, remembering your past faulty deeds. If in this time you are innocent, then you have sinned greatly in the past; with this you will be convinced that you deserve punishment. Self justification is a large sin."

-- St. Ambrose of Optina (d. 1891), On Humility (Source)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #239 on: February 10, 2013, 07:09:05 PM »

Even though we distinguish the energy from the nature and the nature from the persons, we do not attribute any synthetic character to nature itself; we do not divide and we do not fragment the nature into persons and energies: the persons and the energies are neither ‘parts’ nor ‘components’ nor ‘passions’ nor ‘accidents’ of nature, but the mode of being of nature. The personal expression of each energy recapitulates ‘impartially’ and ‘wholely’ the entire nature; it is the existence of nature. The how of the energy of will (or the energy of creativity or of love or whatever other energy) recapitulates the what of the natural energy of will; the possibility of nature to will exists and is expressed only through the otherness of the personal will. Painting, music, sculpture are creative energies of the human nature, but they do not exist except as expressions of personal otherness: as music of Mozart, as painting of Van Gogh, as sculpture of Rodin. Nor is there any other manner of expressing and defining essence or nature outside its active ecstasis in terms of personal otherness. The only way we can name nature is in the personally expressed energy of nature; energy ‘signifies’ nature: ‘Essence and energy can both receive the same name (λόγος)’.

-- Christos Yannaras (b. 1935), The Distinction Between Essence and Energies (Source)
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 07:09:35 PM by Asteriktos » Logged
Gebre Menfes Kidus
"SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Ethiopian Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Tewahedo / Non-Chalcedonian
Posts: 8,229


"Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"


WWW
« Reply #240 on: February 11, 2013, 03:59:23 AM »

When you are being plagued, never ask what for and why. You will never find that in the Scripture. Instead, it says: "If somebody strikes you on your right cheek, turn the other one to him." It is really difficult to strike one on the right cheek and should be understood as: if somebody starts to denigrate you or provoke you unjustifiably, that will mean hitting you on your right cheek. Do not grumble but bear this blow patiently, and turn your left cheek, that is, remembering your past faulty deeds. If in this time you are innocent, then you have sinned greatly in the past; with this you will be convinced that you deserve punishment. Self justification is a large sin."

-- St. Ambrose of Optina (d. 1891), On Humility (Source)


I really need this one. Thank you.



Selam
Logged

"If you stop to throw stones at every dog that barks at you along the way, you will never reach your goal." [Turkish Proverb]
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #241 on: February 12, 2013, 02:55:14 PM »

Holy Scripture is like a very deep well wherein is comprised the infinite wisdom of God. If someone thirsty dives into this well to drink of all its water, he will be drowned within. If, however, he will fetch the water with a bucket and from there will drink with a cup, then there is no fear of being engulfed. What man is so crazed as to wish to plunge into such an abyss of water without knowing how to swim? Holy Scripture, according to the Fathers, is bone and no one will venture with teeth fit for milk to break the strong bones of Holy Scripture - for those teeth will be crushed.

-- Elder Cleopa (d. 1998), Source
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #242 on: February 14, 2013, 06:37:41 AM »

We see, therefore, that in Christian consciousness this concept of the Church and the nature of her life are inseparable from the idea of struggle and the presence of this struggle in the living experience of Church life. Given this understanding, it becomes clear that if a pastor, as the continuation of the work of Christ and the Apostles, must work in the Church and for the Church, the very nature of his services, its direction and its character, must define this particular nature of the Church. Inasmuch as this is inseparable from warfare and podvig (spiritual and also external), a pastor must, therefore, base all his activity exclusively on the principle of podvig and warfare.

From this it is clear that pastoral work is not foreign to asceticism; on the contrary, it is intimately connected with it, and any departure from this, any attempt to define himself and his work on the basis of any other principle will lead to the ruin not only of the pastoral work but also of the pastor himself. The special nature of the Church and her life determines the unique nature of pastoral work, which is unlike any other kind of service, and therefore any attempt--whether through misunderstanding or through obstinacy--to make it into conventional social service will only result in the ruin of all church activity and the ruin of the pastor himself. 

-- St. Theodorus Pozdeev (d. 1938), The Ascetic Nature of the Church (Source)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #243 on: February 16, 2013, 01:10:58 PM »

The elder said: Whether we pray for ourselves or for others, the prayer must be from the heart. The problems of others should become our problems. You have to prepare for prayer. Read a bit of the Gospel or the Gerontiko and then pray. It requires an attempt to take the mind to the divine space. Study is like a gift which God gives us to direct us to greater spirituality. With study the soul is warmed.

-- Elder Paisios the Athonite (d. 1994), Source
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #244 on: February 17, 2013, 10:21:29 AM »

Other people's opinion concerning us is that mirror before which all, almost without exception, pose. A man makes himself such as he wishes others to see him. But the real man, as he is in actual fact, is not known to anyone, including often even himself, while what lives and acts is a kind of fabricated and embellished figure. This striving for deception is so great that, distorting his nature, a man will sacrifice to it even his own self something unique and inimitable, which is what each human person is.

-- Fr. Alexander Elchaninov (d. 1934), Source
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #245 on: February 18, 2013, 09:38:50 PM »

A true Christian is made by faith and love toward Christ. Our sins do not in the least hinder our Christianity, according to the word of the Saviour Himself. He deigned to say: not the rigteous have I come to call, but sinners to salvation; there is more joy in heaven over one who repents then over ninety righteous ones. Likewise concerning the sinful woman who touched His feet, He deigned to say to the the Pharisee Simon: to one who has love, a great debt is forgiven, but from one who has no love, even a small debt will be demanded. From these judgements a Christian should bring himself to hope and joy, and not in the least accept an inflicted despair. Here one needs the shield of faith.

-- St. Herman of Alaska (d. 1837), Source
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #246 on: February 18, 2013, 09:46:50 PM »

O marvellous! A sun is made, and no counsel precedes; a heaven likewise; and to these no single thing in creation is equal. So great a wonder is formed by a word alone, and the saying indicates neither when, nor how, nor any such detail. So too in all particular cases, the æther, the stars, the intermediate air, the sea, the earth, the animals, the plants—all are brought into being with a word, while only to the making of man does the Maker of all draw near with circumspection, so as to prepare beforehand for him material for his formation, and to liken his form to an archetypal beauty, and, setting before him a mark for which he is to come into being, to make for him a nature appropriate and allied to the operations, and suitable for the object in hand.

-- St. Gregory of Nyssa (d. c. 395), On the Making of Man, 3
Logged
Romaios
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Romanian
Posts: 2,933



« Reply #247 on: February 18, 2013, 10:04:28 PM »

-- St. Gregory of Nyssa (d. c. 395), On the Making of Man, 3

St. Gregory is modern when he waxes astronomical?  Grin
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #248 on: February 18, 2013, 10:05:49 PM »

-- St. Gregory of Nyssa (d. c. 395), On the Making of Man, 3

St. Gregory is modern when he waxes astronomical?  Grin

 Cheesy  Oops!
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #249 on: February 19, 2013, 04:05:36 PM »

Of course, the other path--the spiritual path--is not an easy one. There are many sorrows and at times it seems (and it is definitely so) that the whole world, including your closest ones, is armed against you. But then, in accordance with the degree of growing sorrows, one feels an increase of Gracefilled power, an increase in the help which strengthens and gives comfort in sorrow, consolation and even joy. The sorrows of the world, on the other hand, are gloomy and bring us no benefit.

-- St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco (d. 1966), Source
« Last Edit: February 19, 2013, 04:06:04 PM by Asteriktos » Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #250 on: February 24, 2013, 08:51:59 AM »

Father Herman gave them all one common question: "What do you, gentlemen, love above all, and what would each of you wish for his happiness?" Diverse answers followed. One desired wealth, one glory, one a beautiful wife, one a fine ship which he should command, and so on in this fashion. "Is it not true," said Father Herman at this, "that all your various desires can be reduced to one - that each of you desires that which, in his understanding, he considers best and most worthy of love?" "Yes, it is so," they all replied. "Well, then, tell me," he continued, "can there be anything better, higher above everything, more surpassing everything and in general more worthy of love, than our Lord Jesus Christ Himself, who created us, perfectly adorned us, gave life to all, supports all, nourishes and loves all, who Himself is love and more excellent than all men? Should not a person then love God high above all and desire and seek Him more than all else?" All began to say: "Well, yes! That is understood! That speaks for itself!"

-- St. Herman of Alaska (d. 1837), Source
Logged
stavros_388
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic
Jurisdiction: Diocese of Nelson
Posts: 1,217



« Reply #251 on: April 02, 2013, 08:06:07 AM »

Let us not, who would be Christians, expect anything else from it than to be crucified. For to be a Christian is to be crucified, in this time and in any time since Christ came for the first time. His life is the example–and warning–to us all. We must be crucified personally, mystically; for through crucifixion is the only path to resurrection. If we would rise with Christ, we must first be humbled with Him–even to the ultimate humiliation, being devoured and spit forth by the uncomprehending world. And we must be crucified outwardly, in the eyes of the world; for Christ’s Kingdom is not of this world, and the world cannot bear it, even in a single representation of it, even for a single moment. The world can only accept Antichrist, now or at anytime. No wonder, then, that it is so hard to be Christian–it is not hard, it is impossible. No one can knowingly accept a way of life which, the more truly it is lived, leads more surely to one’s own destruction. And that is way we constantly rebel, try to make life easier, try to be half-Christian, try to make the best of both worlds. We must ultimately choose–our felicity lies in one world or the other, not in both. God give is the strength to pursue the path of crucifixion; there is not other way to be Christian.

-- Fr. Seraphim Rose of Platina
http://deathtotheworld.com/articles/blessed-hieromonk-seraphim-rose/
Logged

"The kingdom of heaven is virtuous life, just as the torment of hell is passionate habits." - St. Gregory of Sinai

"Our idea of God tells us more about ourselves than about Him." - Thomas Merton
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #252 on: June 23, 2013, 12:32:51 AM »

In order for a person to be immortal he must, at the very core of his sense of self, feel himself immortal. For him to be eternal, in his center of consciousness of self he must know himself eternal. Without doing this, for him both immortality and eternity alike will be conditions imposed from the outside.

-- St. Justin Popovich (d. 1979), The Inward Mission of Our Church
« Last Edit: June 23, 2013, 12:33:40 AM by Asteriktos » Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #253 on: June 24, 2013, 03:18:50 AM »

It is madness for a Christian to be envious. In Christ we have all received infinitely great blessings; are all made godly; are all made inheritors of the unspeakable and eternal blessings of the kingdom of heaven. And we are also promised a sufficiency of earthly blessings, upon the condition of seeking the righteousness of God and the Kingdom of God. "Seek ye first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you." We are commended to be contented with what we have, and not to be covetous.

-- St. John of Kronstadt (d. 1908), My Life in Christ (Source)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #254 on: June 24, 2013, 09:43:48 PM »

If you pray without giving alms, your prayer is dead. Your hands should always be open. Give alms to orphans and widows. Alms and prayers go together.

-- George (Karslidis) the New Confessor of Drama (d. 1959), Source
Logged
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,483



« Reply #255 on: June 25, 2013, 12:15:22 AM »

Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
c.warren165
earthbound misfit
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: becoming Orthodox
Jurisdiction: visiting OCA
Posts: 27


Lord save me


« Reply #256 on: June 28, 2013, 06:13:12 PM »

where is the "like" button? 

 Wink
Logged

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death...
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #257 on: July 26, 2013, 09:28:36 AM »

Prayers before confession should never be omitted. Confession transcends the level of a human dialogue and also that of a purely rational acknowledgment of guilt. The man can say "guilty" and yet feel no repentance. All sacraments are acts of transformation. And the first transformation in the sacrament of penance is precisely that of a human confession of transgressions into Christian repentance, i.e., into a purifying crisis of the human soul, which turns itself to God and from Him receives the vision of both sin and the overwhelming love of God "covering" that sin. But this transformation requires Divine help, and prayers before confession invoke and call for this help. They are, therefore, an integral part of the sacrament.

-- Fr. Alexander Schmemann (d. 1983), Some Reflections on Confession
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #258 on: July 27, 2013, 05:26:25 PM »

The late Francis Dvornik has clearly described the contrast which gradually developed between East and West in interpreting the meaning of regional primacies. In the East, the power of the major sees or patriarchates was interpreted pragmatically, as an expression of the prestige of cities around which local churches gathered themselves quite naturally and whose leadership, at first taken for granted, was later formally defined in conciliar legislation. Thus, Constantinople owed its rise to the fact of being the new imperial capital. In the West, meanwhile, the early collapse of imperial administration and the fact that Rome was the only "apostolic" see led to the development of papal primacy, which claimed a divinely-established origin and frequently served as a healthy balance to secularistic and caesaropapistic trends in Byzantium. It is interesting that the collapse of imperial Byzantium in the late medieval period gave rise to a similar "primacy phenomenon" in the East.

-- Fr. John Meyendorff (d. 1992), The Byzantine Legacy in the Orthodox Church, pp. 222-223
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #259 on: July 29, 2013, 11:43:01 PM »

Prayer is the offering of the mind and heart to God. However, while we are living in the body upon earth, our prayer naturally is expressed in various outward forms: bows and prostrations, the sign of the Cross, the lifting up of the hands, the use of various objects in the Divine services, and all the outward actions of the public Divine services of Orthodox Christians...

The Lord Jesus Christ Himself did not avoid the outward manifestations of prayer and sacrifice actions: He bowed the knee, fell on His face and prayed; He raised His hands and blessed; He breathed and said to His disciples: “Peace be to you;” He used outward actions when healing; He visited the Temple in Jerusalem and called it “the house of My Father:” “My house shall be called the house of prayer” (Matt. 21:13). The Apostle also did all these things. Spiritual worship must be accompanied by bodily worship, as a result of the close bond and mutual influence of soul and body. “What! Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own. For ye are bought with a price; therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God’s” (1 Cor. 6:19-20).

-- Fr. Michael Pomazansky (d. 1988), Orthodox Dogmatic Theology
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #260 on: August 06, 2013, 06:59:08 AM »

It is true that Our Lord Jesus Christ, seeing the slipping away of human nature, receives with open arms the returned sinner. At the same time, however, He says: “Watch and pray, for ye know not the day nor the hour when the Son of Man cometh.” He thereby motivates us to be always prepared and to have in our vessels the oil of repentance and every other virtue, so as not to be excluded from the bridal chamber like the foolish virgins. True, there exists repentance, and when a young man is pure and avoids bad company and drunkenness, but deviates slightly, then repentance quickly wipes out the young sins. When, however, through bad habits the body becomes a slave to sin, it becomes very difficult, and out of many, only a few will be able to be liberated from the [enemy’s] sophisticated snares.

-- Elder Daniel Katounakiotis (d. 1929), Source
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #261 on: August 11, 2013, 08:28:31 PM »

In general it is very important that we avoid at all cost being scrupulously anxious over our sins to the point where we doubt God’s mercy or think that His forgiveness depends upon our human worthiness or our frail memory. God judges our intentions and sincerity in repentance and not our capacity at memorization. This, of course, does not mean that a “sincere intention” takes the place of an actual confession of sins. But it certainly does mean that the power of God’s forgiveness is not bound to our recollection of actual sins, or even our ability to avoid them. There are never so many or so great sins that God is not able to forgive them. There is never a confession so perfect that it merits God’s mercy because of its perfection. There is never a Holy Communion, which is not both given and received by a sinner. Any other thoughts on any of these points is not only bad theology, but blasphemy; and could even lead to
mental and spiritual disorder.

-- Fr. Thomas Hopko (b. 1939), If We Confess Our Sins (pdf)
« Last Edit: August 11, 2013, 08:28:48 PM by Asteriktos » Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #262 on: August 14, 2013, 06:23:04 AM »

At every moment of his existence the Christian ought to seek a perfection like to that of his heavenly Father and to lay claim to the divine Kingdom; all his life is subject to the words "Seek ye first the kingdom of God and his justice, and all these things shall be added unto you." The fact that our nature is sinful and that the ideal is in every way unattainable on earth must not paralyse our striving after perfection or quench our longing for the kingdom and righteousness of God. Man has to try to apply divine truth without worrying about how it will be realized in the fulness of life.

-- Nikolai Berdyaev (d. 1948), The Worth of Christianity and the Unworthiness of Christians, 4
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #263 on: August 15, 2013, 09:08:35 PM »

Unfortunately, brethren, we do not like to acknowledge our transgressions. It would seem natural and easy for a person to know his own self, his own soul and his shortcomings. This, however, is actually not so. We are ready to attend to anything but a deeper understanding of ourselves, an investigation of our sins. We examine various things with curiosity, we attentively study friends and strangers, but when faced with solitude without extraneous preoccupation even for a short while, we immediately become bored and attempt to seek amusement. For example, do we spend much time examining our own conscience even before confession? Perhaps a few minutes, and once a year at that. Casting a cursory glance at our soul, correcting some of its more glaring faults, we immediately cover it over with the veil of oblivion until next year, until our next uncomfortable exercise in boredom.

-- St. Tikhon of Moscow (d. 1925), Homily on Cheesefare Sunday
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #264 on: August 17, 2013, 12:36:28 AM »

This plan, this entrance of God’s into the world, into Creation – this penetration of the Uncreated into the created state for the purpose of uniting the two – is performed only by the one Person of the Holy Trinity; this is an “entry” in the form of a union; an undertaking to act as a bridge. However, given that the Persons of the Holy Trinity are never separated between themselves, nor are the other two Persons ever absent from this action of the one person,  it means that every Person of the Holy Trinity participates in this event of Christology.

-- Met. John Zizioulas (b. 1931), Lessons on Christian Dogmatics
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #265 on: November 17, 2013, 12:25:21 PM »

It is also possible to "live" the Word of Scripture. In the perspective of the Church Fathers, this means to "hear" the Word in the true sense of that expression. In biblical languages, "to hear" implies "to obey". To hear the Word in this sense is to open oneself to it, on the level of the heart as well as the mind. It is to hear the voice of God in Scripture and to accept its challenge in the sphere of human relationships. Finally, this degree of hearing leads to an actual praying of the Word.

-- Fr. John Breck (b. 1939), Source
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #266 on: November 18, 2013, 10:10:35 PM »

Do not think that we are talking about something very lofty which is an unattainable state for living people. No. It truly is a lofty state, but attainable by all. Does not everyone at some time feel warmth in their hearts in prayer, when the soul separates itself from all things and deeply enters into itself and prays hotly to God? This movement of the prayerful spirit, although it was once only temporary, must be made into a constant state, and it will reach the limits of prayer.

The means to this, as I have said, is the work of prayer. When one rubs two sticks together, they warm up and catch fire. Similarly, when the soul is rubbed in the work of prayer, it eventually leads to prayerful fire. The work of prayer consists of a proper completion of the two types of prayer of which I have already spoken, namely - pious, attentive, and feeling completion of our usual prayers, and then training of the soul to frequently ascend to God through divine contemplation, turning of all things to the glory of God, and frequent crying to God from the heart.

-- St. Theophan the Reculse (d. 1894), On Prayer, Homily 3
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #267 on: November 19, 2013, 06:39:14 PM »

This consideration is developed by St. Maximus, for whom creatures are defined in the first place as beings who are limited, which is as much as to say (according to St. Maximus) that their end is outside of themselves, that there is something towards which they tend, that they are in a perpetual state of becoming. Wherever there is diversity and multiplicity there is becoming; everything in the created world is in a state of becoming, the intelligible as well as the sensible, and this limitation and this movement of becoming are the domain of the forms of space and time. God alone remains in absolute repose; and His perfect unmovability places him outside space and time. If one attributes movement to Him in His relationship to created being, it is meant that He produces in creatures the love which makes them tend towards Himself, that He draws them to Him, 'desiring to be desired and loving to be loved'.

-- Vladimir Lossky (d. 1958), The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church, pp. 97-98 (PDF)
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #268 on: November 20, 2013, 11:26:36 AM »

Finally, [for a true and correct confession]  it is necessary to set forth a firm intention to live prudently in the future. If you want to be in the kingdom of heaven, if you want God to forgive your sins—then stop sinning! Only on this condition does the Church absolve the penitent of his sins. And he who does not think at all about correcting himself confesses in vain, labors in vain, for even if the priest says, “I forgive and absolve,” the Holy Spirit does not forgive and absolve him!

-- St. Innocent of Alaska (d. 1879), What is Necessary For a Saving Confession?
Logged
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #269 on: November 22, 2013, 10:49:14 PM »

The effects of man's fall were both physical and moral. On the physical level human beings became subject to pain and disease, to the debility and bodily disintegration of old age. Woman's joy in bringing forth new life became mixed with the pangs of childbirth. None of this was part of God's initial plan for humanity. In consequence of the fall, men and women also became subject to the seperation of the soul and body in physical death... On the moral level, in consequence of the fall human beings became subject to frustration, boredom, depression. Work, which was intended to be a source of joy for man and a means of communion with God, had now to be performed for the most part unwillingly, 'in the sweat of the face'. Nor was this all. Man became subject to inward alienation: weakened in will, divided against himself, he became his own enemy and executioner.

-- Met. Kallistos Ware (b. 1934), The Orthodox Way (Saint Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1979), p. 60
« Last Edit: November 22, 2013, 10:51:59 PM by Asteriktos » Logged
Tags: Patristic sayings patristics saints Church Fathers 
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 »  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.13 seconds with 71 queries.