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Author Topic: Looking at Orthodoxy  (Read 3243 times) Average Rating: 0
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Antonious
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« on: September 04, 2013, 07:00:51 PM »

Grace and Peace,

Since this is my first post (I've been lurking here for a couple of years) I want to say "Hello" to everyone, and also provide a brief personal background.

I come from a nominally Protestant family, yet I was dissatisfied with the sectarianism of the Protestant churches. Believing in the One, Holy, Universal and Apostolic Church prompted me to investigate Orthodoxy. I have been attempting to balance my bookish tendencies (i.e. intellectual pursuits) with a prayerful life (i.e. a contemplative approach). I think both are important to cultivate.

I have been draw to both the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox communions. There are local parishes in my area from several jurisdictions and communions. I am currently not affiliated with an Orthodox parish, nor have I been baptized in an Orthodox church (though I was baptized as a child in a Protestant church). It is unclear at present where God will lead me. I am praying for discernment. Please consider remembering me in your prayers.

Going forward, I hope to participate in more dialog here on the forum.
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2013, 07:22:28 PM »

Vwelcome Smiley
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2013, 08:11:02 PM »

I come from much the same background and am in a very similar situation.

The difference is practicality. There are EO parishes that are closer to my house than OO parishes. So, Greek Orthodox or OCA are the two choices.

I have been to the Greek parish, it's small. From what I have seen through photos of the OCA parish it is much larger. I will go there next and maybe cycle on and off until I settle into one of them.
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2013, 08:38:05 PM »

Vwelcome Smiley

Thank you Asteriktos!
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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2013, 09:21:21 PM »

Hello xOrthodox4Christx,

I come from much the same background and am in a very similar situation.

The difference is practicality. There are EO parishes that are closer to my house than OO parishes. So, Greek Orthodox or OCA are the two choices.

I have been to the Greek parish, it's small. From what I have seen through photos of the OCA parish it is much larger. I will go there next and maybe cycle on and off until I settle into one of them.

Thank you for your comments. Where I live I know for certain there are parishes that are ROCOR, and Coptic Orthodox fairly close to me. A bit further out from me there is a Greek Orthodox parish and an OCA parish. There are probably more than these as well.

I intend to visit (at minimum) the ROCOR parish and the Coptic Orthodox parish as soon as I am able, partially because they are close to me, but also because I have been attracted to both for different reasons. The Liturgy of the Coptic Church is very beautiful (I have never been, but I have watched videos of it). I simply love the hymns and chants. And I like the fact that the Agpeya is a prayer book used by priests, monks and lay alike. I obtained a copy several years ago and pray some of the Hours daily as part of my (self-imposed) prayer rule. On the EO side, I like that there is a wealth of literature already available in English translation. I am not ethnically Russian, Greek or Copt, and can only read and speak English, so my studies (for now, at least) are restricted to texts in English. There seems to be an abundance of literature coming out of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

What I lack is participation in parish life, and a direct relationship with a priest (as guide and mentor). I guess the best thing for me to do at this point is to visit my local parishes, and keep praying for discernment. Smiley



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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2013, 11:48:12 PM »

Welcome, Antonius.

You're on the right path. Attend services and introduce yourself to the clergy. You might meet a priest who strikes a chord with you, with whom you can discuss specific issues.

I think it's pretty common for "Oriental Orthodox" (especially English-speaking converts) to read "Eastern Orthodox" literature. We share a common Eastern Christian spirituality, after all. Don't join EO for the wealth of literature, join us for our four extra ecumenical councils and our pierogi (just kidding, of course Wink ).
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« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2013, 11:54:24 PM »

Don't join EO for the wealth of literature, join us for our four extra ecumenical councils and our pierogi (just kidding, of course Wink ).

Wink
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« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2013, 12:58:14 AM »

Welcome to the forum, Antonious.

There is a lot available from the non-Chalcedonian Orthodox Church, although because of their relatively shorter history in the west, it is still probably less than what the Chalcedonians have. Still, you can find a lot of English material at the website of the British Orthodox Church, naturally (which is within the Coptic Orthodox Patriarchate). If it is specifically Coptic Orthodoxy you are interested in (as the BOC was established for Britons), then you can find a wealth of English material on the Southern United States Diocese's website (see "Questions and Answers" and other sections under the "Features" column on the right side of the homepage), or that of the Diocese of Los Angeles, or of Sydney, Australia, etc.

You can also find a lot of books and other reading material in PDF format at the very appropriately named Coptic Book site. (Note: Unfortunately, many of the translations of HH Pope Shenouda III's books, at least that I've read, require some...erm...liberal interpretations of the English language, but they can still be profitable if you are willing to put in the effort; they are definitely worth it, I'd say).
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« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2013, 09:00:44 AM »

Welcome and best wishes on your journey!  I'm not really going to plug any particular church other than to say visit them all with an open mind, speak to the priests at each and bathe your decision in prayer.  Smiley
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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2013, 09:57:58 AM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy
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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2013, 10:20:35 AM »

I have been drawn to both the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox communions. There are local parishes in my area from several jurisdictions and communions.

I see that you seem to have some awareness that these are two separate families of churches which are not in communion with one another. Many inquirers miss out on this fact. I would encourage you to try to understand the differences and weigh their importance as you investigate Orthodoxy, but ultimately without some command of the ancient languages used in the theological debates you're just going to have to follow your gut. But I wouldn't agree that "we're just the same" or whatever. While there are a great many similarities, there are also many differences.

I hope that you get closer to God by investigating Orthodoxy. Welcome to the forum.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 10:21:13 AM by Alveus Lacuna » Logged
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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2013, 11:14:42 AM »

I have seen OOs quote from EO Fathers like St. Symeon the New Theologian, St. Gregory Palamas and St. Photios many times.

The difference is communion mainly, not theology. The issues of the nature of Christ from the Council of Chalcedon have been gone over countless times.

Most modern theologians say that the difference between Christ's Physis and Ousia, in OO and EO Christology, are a matter of semantics, and that both are essentially teaching the same thing.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 11:17:38 AM by xOrthodox4Christx » Logged

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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2013, 11:18:29 AM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy

Lord have mercy.
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« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2013, 11:25:16 AM »

Most modern theologians say that the difference between Christ's Physis and Ousia are a matter of semantics, and that both are essentially teaching the same thing.

And we can trust these modern theologians over the people of the day? Did they not understand their immediate circumstances better? Maybe hindsight really is 20/20, but in this case I'm highly skeptical.

Platitudes about using different words to essentially say the same thing is the exact way that the ecumenically minded Roman Catholics describe Greek versus Latin theological approaches to God. It's also the way that universalism describes the disparate theologies of the various world religions. Different paths to God, etc.

I think that this glossing over of differences has more to do with how we wish that it was back then rather than how it actually was. We wish that those Christians really hadn't cared enough about those linguistic formulations to cause permanent divides in Christendom. But they did, and here we stand.

If the differences are merely semantic, then let's just get it over with and adopt their formulations. After all, we're just saying the same thing in different ways. So in the spirit of Christian charity and humility, let's say it their way!
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 11:28:54 AM by Alveus Lacuna » Logged
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« Reply #14 on: September 05, 2013, 11:42:14 AM »

Guys, can we not... Roll Eyes

This thread is not in EO/OO private discussions.
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« Reply #15 on: September 05, 2013, 12:30:41 PM »

Guys, can we not... Roll Eyes

This thread is not in EO/OO private discussions.

+1
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« Reply #16 on: September 05, 2013, 12:58:29 PM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy
bleah!
I converted despite the cabbage.
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Antonious
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« Reply #17 on: September 05, 2013, 04:25:42 PM »

Welcome, Antonius.

You're on the right path. Attend services and introduce yourself to the clergy. You might meet a priest who strikes a chord with you, with whom you can discuss specific issues.

I think it's pretty common for "Oriental Orthodox" (especially English-speaking converts) to read "Eastern Orthodox" literature. We share a common Eastern Christian spirituality, after all. Don't join EO for the wealth of literature, join us for our four extra ecumenical councils and our pierogi (just kidding, of course Wink ).

@lovesupreme, thanks for the encouragement. OK, I think you won me over to the EO because I love pierogis! Haha, just kidding. But levity is good!
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« Reply #18 on: September 05, 2013, 04:27:26 PM »

Welcome to the forum, Antonious.

There is a lot available from the non-Chalcedonian Orthodox Church, although because of their relatively shorter history in the west, it is still probably less than what the Chalcedonians have. Still, you can find a lot of English material at the website of the British Orthodox Church, naturally (which is within the Coptic Orthodox Patriarchate). If it is specifically Coptic Orthodoxy you are interested in (as the BOC was established for Britons), then you can find a wealth of English material on the Southern United States Diocese's website (see "Questions and Answers" and other sections under the "Features" column on the right side of the homepage), or that of the Diocese of Los Angeles, or of Sydney, Australia, etc.

You can also find a lot of books and other reading material in PDF format at the very appropriately named Coptic Book site. (Note: Unfortunately, many of the translations of HH Pope Shenouda III's books, at least that I've read, require some...erm...liberal interpretations of the English language, but they can still be profitable if you are willing to put in the effort; they are definitely worth it, I'd say).

@dzheremi, thank you for the welcome, and for pointing out some English resources for the Coptic Church. I was aware of the British Orthodox Church and think they are doing wonderful work. I have been more drawn to specifically Coptic Orthodoxy in terms of Liturgy and the Mysteries/Sacraments (For example, the Liturgy of St. Basil rather than the Liturgy of St. James, etc.). It is not that I think there is anything lacking or in error with the BOC (I note that they are officially within the Coptic Orthodox Patriarchate, so I am assuming this means the COC and the BOC are one in terms of doctrine and faith), yet I feel more inclined to seek out a Coptic Orthodox parish. Also, I live in the US, and I don't think there is a BOC presence here, but there are several parishes that are Coptic Orthodox (I know of five in my state, two of which are relatively close to where I live). I will certainly return to the BOC website now and again though, and keep my eye out for English publications there, as well as from the other resources you shared. Thanks again!
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 04:34:58 PM by Antonious » Logged

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« Reply #19 on: September 05, 2013, 04:27:58 PM »

Welcome and best wishes on your journey!  I'm not really going to plug any particular church other than to say visit them all with an open mind, speak to the priests at each and bathe your decision in prayer.  Smiley

@TheTrisagion, thank you for the welcome. Excellent advice! Taken to heart. Thanks again.
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« Reply #20 on: September 05, 2013, 04:29:46 PM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy

@Napoletani, thanks for the advice. LOL, more food options! Of course, I will not really base my decision of which parish to attend on preferred ethnic cuisine, but I receive your information with a warm heart (and an empty stomach. Almost time for dinner! lol).  Grin
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« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2013, 04:31:35 PM »

Most modern theologians say that the difference between Christ's Physis and Ousia are a matter of semantics, and that both are essentially teaching the same thing.

And we can trust these modern theologians over the people of the day? Did they not understand their immediate circumstances better? Maybe hindsight really is 20/20, but in this case I'm highly skeptical.

@Alveus Lacuna and xOrthodox4Christx, I appreciate your feedback, both of you. I realize going into this that this is a very sensitive subject, and I do not want to provoke polemical arguments, or cause any ill feelings. That said, as a potential convert to Orthodoxy I am faced with having to look into the history of Chalcedon, and what happened there (espcially between what became the Chalcedonian and Non-Chalcedonion communions), and subsequent history, all the way down to today. I am heartened to read about attempts towards unity, or, at least, some initial discussions in this direction. As for the details, perhaps this is not the best thread for that, though my initial post does lead in this direction. Apologies. God bless.
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« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2013, 06:11:06 PM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy

@Napoletani, thanks for the advice. LOL, more food options! Of course, I will not really base my decision of which parish to attend on preferred ethnic cuisine, but I receive your information with a warm heart (and an empty stomach. Almost time for dinner! lol).  Grin

I'm dating a catholic girl, and one of first things i did was to bring her to romanian restaurant hehe so it is my best trick to convert people to Romanian Orthodoxy now  Grin
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« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2013, 06:29:13 PM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy

@Napoletani, thanks for the advice. LOL, more food options! Of course, I will not really base my decision of which parish to attend on preferred ethnic cuisine, but I receive your information with a warm heart (and an empty stomach. Almost time for dinner! lol).  Grin

I'm dating a catholic girl, and one of first things i did was to bring her to romanian restaurant hehe so it is my best trick to convert people to Romanian Orthodoxy now  Grin
methinks you overestimate the romanian cuisine. most people i know think it's pretty undistinguishable from other eastern european cuisines like serbian or polish etc.
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« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2013, 06:57:23 PM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy

@Napoletani, thanks for the advice. LOL, more food options! Of course, I will not really base my decision of which parish to attend on preferred ethnic cuisine, but I receive your information with a warm heart (and an empty stomach. Almost time for dinner! lol).  Grin

I'm dating a catholic girl, and one of first things i did was to bring her to romanian restaurant hehe so it is my best trick to convert people to Romanian Orthodoxy now  Grin
methinks you overestimate the romanian cuisine. most people i know think it's pretty undistinguishable from other eastern european cuisines like serbian or polish etc.

Like serbian yes, dont know polish cuisines. But i ate bulgarian, it is not as good as us. Even if it is almost the same. But repeating them our food is the best, they will believe it and come to our church maybe  Grin
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« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2013, 07:02:50 PM »

well anyways, if your gf is italian or french (can't remember where you said you lived) both these cuisines are infinitely more varied -and hence better-than the romanian cuisine.
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« Reply #26 on: September 05, 2013, 07:03:36 PM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy
bleah!
I converted despite the cabbage.

Sarma, golubtsi or lakhanodolmadhes, it's all GOOD! I shall pray for you, my dear.  Wink
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« Reply #27 on: September 05, 2013, 07:06:50 PM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy
bleah!
I converted despite the cabbage.

Hahaha even i have hard time to stand the smelling of it despite smelling it since infancy.
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« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2013, 07:07:41 PM »

well anyways, if your gf is italian or french (can't remember where you said you lived) both these cuisines are infinitely more varied -and hence better-than the romanian cuisine.

She's french, i live in France. And yes, i agree with you, especially about the french food.
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« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2013, 07:22:52 PM »

Welcome  Smiley    Do not forget the food issue, if you go to Romanian Orthodox Church you will eat the best sarma in the world after the Divine Liturgy, that should have some weight in the balance for your choice  Cheesy

@Napoletani, thanks for the advice. LOL, more food options! Of course, I will not really base my decision of which parish to attend on preferred ethnic cuisine, but I receive your information with a warm heart (and an empty stomach. Almost time for dinner! lol).  Grin

I'm dating a catholic girl, and one of first things i did was to bring her to romanian restaurant hehe so it is my best trick to convert people to Romanian Orthodoxy now  Grin
methinks you overestimate the romanian cuisine. most people i know think it's pretty undistinguishable from other eastern european cuisines like serbian or polish etc.

I would say Balkan cousine is similat within, however I can't really compare Polish to it. Polish would be more like KUK one.
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« Reply #30 on: September 05, 2013, 09:04:09 PM »

Most modern theologians say that the difference between Christ's Physis and Ousia are a matter of semantics, and that both are essentially teaching the same thing.

And we can trust these modern theologians over the people of the day? Did they not understand their immediate circumstances better? Maybe hindsight really is 20/20, but in this case I'm highly skeptical.

Platitudes about using different words to essentially say the same thing is the exact way that the ecumenically minded Roman Catholics describe Greek versus Latin theological approaches to God. It's also the way that universalism describes the disparate theologies of the various world religions. Different paths to God, etc.

I think that this glossing over of differences has more to do with how we wish that it was back then rather than how it actually was. We wish that those Christians really hadn't cared enough about those linguistic formulations to cause permanent divides in Christendom. But they did, and here we stand.

If the differences are merely semantic, then let's just get it over with and adopt their formulations. After all, we're just saying the same thing in different ways. So in the spirit of Christian charity and humility, let's say it their way!

Just putting it out there. I recognize that semantics are used to sugarcoat things into what they aren't. Sure, Latins do it all of the time.

Two Ousia, One Physis; Two Physis, One Ousia...
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 09:06:45 PM by xOrthodox4Christx » Logged

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« Reply #31 on: September 08, 2013, 03:42:37 PM »

Ah, Grace and Peace. I've been Anglican (if you were interested in Protestanism, Anglicanism is the way to go, it's a beautiful faith), Eastern-rite Catholic, and a Reform Jew before I finally made a decision to practice and eventually formally convert to Holy Orthodoxy. It's a gentle and beautiful faith, with a lovely liturgy, friendly people, and a welcoming spirit. We are here to worship God, and we don't judge anyone, because we are all here because we are in need of healing by Christ our Divine Physician.

I would highly recommend Eastern Orthodoxy because she has upheld the seven Ecumeunical Councils, and is relatively unchanged since the time of the apostles. Oriental Orthodoxy is an interesting faith, but doesn't uphold several of  the Ecumeunical Councils.
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« Reply #32 on: September 09, 2013, 02:08:01 AM »

I would highly recommend Eastern Orthodoxy because she has upheld the seven Ecumeunical Councils, and is relatively unchanged since the time of the apostles. Oriental Orthodoxy is an interesting faith, but doesn't uphold several of  the Ecumeunical Councils.
If the number of councils held as "Ecumenical" or "Universal" within that communion is the yard stick; then the Roman Catholics have 21 Ecumenical Councils vs 7 Ecumenical Councils for the EO and 3 Ecumenical Councils for OO.

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« Reply #33 on: September 09, 2013, 02:23:11 AM »

well anyways, if your gf is italian or french (can't remember where you said you lived) both these cuisines are infinitely more varied -and hence better-than the romanian cuisine.
I'm surprised: I would have thought you would have found cuisine, let alone French cuisine, too bourgeois.

Chinese cuisine is more varied-eating rats and live fish (and snakes-I can't remember if they have them live too), for instance.  Don't think that makes it better.
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« Reply #34 on: September 09, 2013, 08:19:15 AM »

well anyways, if your gf is italian or french (can't remember where you said you lived) both these cuisines are infinitely more varied -and hence better-than the romanian cuisine.
I'm surprised: I would have thought you would have found cuisine, let alone French cuisine, too bourgeois.

Chinese cuisine is more varied-eating rats and live fish (and snakes-I can't remember if they have them live too), for instance.  Don't think that makes it better.

In South Korea they eat dogs  Cry
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« Reply #35 on: September 09, 2013, 10:09:45 AM »

I would highly recommend Eastern Orthodoxy because she has upheld the seven Ecumeunical Councils, and is relatively unchanged since the time of the apostles. Oriental Orthodoxy is an interesting faith, but doesn't uphold several of  the Ecumeunical Councils.

I have been listening to Deacon Michael Hyatt's podcast series on the Ecumenical Councils. Can anyone recommend additional sources for this topic? Suggestions for both online and/or print will be greatly appreciated. I have a general idea about the Councils, but want to study these more in depth. I am open to sources from both EO and OO. Thank you in advance.

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« Reply #36 on: September 09, 2013, 10:22:38 AM »

Most modern theologians say that the difference between Christ's Physis and Ousia are a matter of semantics, and that both are essentially teaching the same thing.

And we can trust these modern theologians over the people of the day? Did they not understand their immediate circumstances better? Maybe hindsight really is 20/20, but in this case I'm highly skeptical.

Platitudes about using different words to essentially say the same thing is the exact way that the ecumenically minded Roman Catholics describe Greek versus Latin theological approaches to God. It's also the way that universalism describes the disparate theologies of the various world religions. Different paths to God, etc.

I think that this glossing over of differences has more to do with how we wish that it was back then rather than how it actually was. We wish that those Christians really hadn't cared enough about those linguistic formulations to cause permanent divides in Christendom. But they did, and here we stand.

If the differences are merely semantic, then let's just get it over with and adopt their formulations. After all, we're just saying the same thing in different ways. So in the spirit of Christian charity and humility, let's say it their way!

This genuine observation appears to me at least to be offering the originator of the thread a cautionary note that there are significant differences theologically and in the search for truth this should not be misleadingly glossed over. If our welcome to an inquirer is to be genuine we must be open and honest.

Best wishes to you Antonious in your search for the Narrow Way.
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« Reply #37 on: September 09, 2013, 12:58:53 PM »

Welcome!
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« Reply #38 on: September 11, 2013, 05:47:21 AM »

Best wishes to you Antonious in your search for the Narrow Way.

Thank you Santagranddad. I also appreciate what you say about not glossing over significant differences.

Welcome!

Thank you Didyma!
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« Reply #39 on: September 11, 2013, 08:50:36 AM »

I would highly recommend Eastern Orthodoxy because she has upheld the seven Ecumeunical Councils, and is relatively unchanged since the time of the apostles. Oriental Orthodoxy is an interesting faith, but doesn't uphold several of  the Ecumeunical Councils.

I have been listening to Deacon Michael Hyatt's podcast series on the Ecumenical Councils. Can anyone recommend additional sources for this topic? Suggestions for both online and/or print will be greatly appreciated. I have a general idea about the Councils, but want to study these more in depth. I am open to sources from both EO and OO. Thank you in advance.



Fr. Thomas Hopko's podcast "Speaking the Truth in Love" has a continuing (42 parts so far, on Ancient Faith Radio) series called "Bishops" which is a really good historical overview of bishops in the Church, including the Ecumenical Councils and the many canons.  I've learned a lot from them and they point me towards more literature on the subject.
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« Reply #40 on: September 11, 2013, 09:49:40 AM »

Antonios, Don't forget that we also have a forum on Oriental Orthodoxy as well that may be an excellent resource to you. Please contnue to post in the Convert Issues forum and if you like, post questions needing deeper responses on the beliefs or resources pertaining to the Oriental Orthodox Churches in the Oriental Orthodox Forum as well. I am happy that you have already made connections with the local orthodox churches in your area, they will be able to give you the true orthopraxis of their churches better than anything in writing can provide.

Welcome to the Convert Issues Forum!

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« Reply #41 on: September 12, 2013, 04:29:05 PM »

Fr. Thomas Hopko's podcast "Speaking the Truth in Love" has a continuing (42 parts so far, on Ancient Faith Radio) series called "Bishops" which is a really good historical overview of bishops in the Church, including the Ecumenical Councils and the many canons.  I've learned a lot from them and they point me towards more literature on the subject.

Hello Hecma925,

I will check out that podcast. It sounds interesting for sure. Thanks for the recommendation.


Antonios, Don't forget that we also have a forum on Oriental Orthodoxy as well that may be an excellent resource to you. Please contnue to post in the Convert Issues forum and if you like, post questions needing deeper responses on the beliefs or resources pertaining to the Oriental Orthodox Churches in the Oriental Orthodox Forum as well. I am happy that you have already made connections with the local orthodox churches in your area, they will be able to give you the true orthopraxis of their churches better than anything in writing can provide.

Welcome to the Convert Issues Forum!

Thomas
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Greetings Thomas,

Thank you for the warm welcome, and for pointing out that there is also an Oriental Orthodox forum here on OC.net. At this point of my journey I guess I would be called an inquirer (into Orthodoxy). I do want to give a fair hearing from both EO and OO, visit the parishes in my area, and continue to pray about it before I make any kind of solid decision as to where I belong. I appreciate the kindness of all who have responded to me, and look forward to more dialog along the way. Thanks again. God bless.
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« Reply #42 on: September 13, 2013, 02:42:34 PM »

Hope you become a member of the True church.
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« Reply #43 on: September 13, 2013, 03:58:24 PM »

I find that visiting churches for services first and then having conversations with priests is a better route than delving into reading--especially reading about Chalcedon and the councils. EO, OO--our faith does not exist in either tracts or histories or theological tomes, but in real life--and as such, one is far less distinguishable from the other than in books or on the Internet.
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« Reply #44 on: September 14, 2013, 04:13:04 AM »

hello and welcome!
and welcome to jules_grant also, who is new (and who i suspect is not actually 13, as he writes like a 23 year old...)
 Wink
we oriental orthodox generally accept all the councils except chalcedon, and even then, chalcedon as expressed by the later councils is fine.
(i am sending another paragraph of info to you separately so i don't derail the thread).
generally it is best to get to know the people in the churches and then decide which church to go to. we are all orthodox and when you find an orthodox church that speaks your language and loves you, stick there.

on a less serious note, egyptian food is awesome, and no one can equal the delicious 'fool medammes' (slightly spicy fava beans) that you can get in many churches during fasting seasons, and also we make the best falafel in all of asia and africa (not made from a dry mixture, but from soaked, ground beans).
our music is cool (if a bit strange) and we sing along with great enthusiasm, even if we occasionally engage in other dodgy practices such as sitting in pews...
 Wink
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