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Question: Will you try (Ayrag aka Kumis)?
Enthusiastic Yes! - 5 (38.5%)
Not on your life - 2 (15.4%)
Tell me of this mystic drink - 6 (46.2%)
Total Voters: 13

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Author Topic: Caballine Nectar  (Read 2901 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: August 30, 2013, 02:48:27 PM »

Open sky and trampling hooves,
O, this precious life of mine;
For the eternal curse of thirst,
Caballine nectar is divine


« Last Edit: August 30, 2013, 02:48:53 PM by hecma925 » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2013, 03:14:17 PM »

Open sky and trampling hooves,
O, this precious life of mine;
For the eternal curse of thirst,
Caballine nectar is divine




This is the kind of poetry I can understand.  Truly sublime.  (Do you write advertising jingles  Grin.)

I voted for option #3.  



I wonder what the little black thingees floating in it are?


EDIT:  Answered my own question--Northwestern Mongolian earwax!!
« Last Edit: August 30, 2013, 03:17:40 PM by J Michael » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2013, 03:31:25 PM »

If this is a sexual euphemism I may be interested.
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« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2013, 03:34:17 PM »

If this is a sexual euphemism I may be interested.

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« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2013, 04:00:55 PM »

If this is a sexual euphemism I may be interested.

You could always make it into one.  Grin


EDIT:  But, should you?
« Last Edit: August 30, 2013, 04:01:29 PM by J Michael » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2013, 08:47:49 PM »

If this is a sexual euphemism I may be interested.

As I learned in literary criticism classes, you can certainly interpret it anyway.  I would be more impressed in seeing a feminist-Marxist analysis of the poem, but a Freudian analysis is fine.  It says much more about you than me. Grin  Or I just have the pure mind of an artist.
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« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2013, 08:57:51 PM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2013, 11:54:43 AM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

And....??
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« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2013, 11:57:22 AM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

And....??

And ... that's what Nectar is ... liquid extract from fruit.
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« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2013, 12:25:51 PM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

And....??

And ... that's what Nectar is ...sugar-rich liquid produced by extract from fruit plants.

Fixed it.

Oh.  Okay.  I thought you were making some point I wasn't getting.
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« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2013, 12:30:38 PM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambrosia
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« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2013, 01:05:17 PM »

What is this claiming here, except that equal rights should be had by all women, and that men must yield to our power as women? Let us consider:

Open sky and trampling hooves,

Thus the stage is set. Men and their war mongering, destroying the beauty of earth and sky. Men, who cannot but indulge their wicked blood-lust. Their proclivity for violence knows no bounds. Why hooves, except to point that men are nothing but filthy animals, when not reigned in by the civilizing touch of women! Men would destroy all in their greed--for money, power and fame--if they were allowed to. There would be no escape from them. The continuous war cry of men echoes through the centuries: “from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs," by which is meant that each man gives what he is able on the battlefield, and in return his "need" for spoils are satiated if he can manage victory. He speaks of his greed and lust as a need! How perfectly male, how perfectly bourgeois.

Quote
O, this precious life of mine;

And so the lament of the forlorn woman continues. Men cannot fathom the true potential of life. They cannot understand the glory of existence. Nothing is precious to them except their [member]. And war and greed and all that consumes them are nothing but an extension of their [member]. The neurobiologic imperative is clear: men must constantly feed the ego of their [member] or perish. But of course, it is a slow, emasculating death. And for a man, who knows neither the wonders of equality, nor the equanimity of femininity, masculinity is all that he has. Yes, it is so poor a replacement as to be laughable. So impotent, so useless; to wit: so male. It is but an empty shell compared to womynhood, comared to the fragrance of the feminine. And as the poetess points out, it is for each women--"mine"! she owns it for herself!--to take what is rightfully hers, and avenge it upon the male twenty fold. This much is clear from the line quoted. I explain all of this for the young children who may be reading this poem for the first time. But what may not be so obvious is how to understand what comes next:

Quote
For the eternal curse of thirst,

What is meant by this? She is being sarcastic! Indeed, what can "eternal curse" here be speaking of except that oppressive, inane myth of the Judeo-Christian religious power, which says that our Mother Eve fell from grace, and manipulated the man. What can be more absurd? We all know that a woman would not be so easily deceived, and that it must have been the man, Adam, who fell. Then, by physical force, and in cooperation with the other beasts of the earth (represented by the serpent), they were able to force Eve to give up her rightful place, her divine destiny. Of course this story was written by men, so it makes men out to be the victims. Men are never the victims, even when they are the ones victimized! This is enough.

Quote
Caballine nectar is divine[/i]

And so we come to the end of this passage. What can we say here? The subtlety and sophistication of the line is breath-taking. Truly it is. What man could hope to match the depth of thought and breadth of experience manifested in this line? Capitalism must yield before the honor and power of such truths. But it is better to leave the main part here unsaid. I will not cast my pearls--all our pearls!--before swine. And that men are swine is axiomatic. We must leave such conversations for when it is only the [member-less] who are present, for some dastardly male may some day get his hands on this interpretation, and if a women has condescended to teach him to read--what then? Should we parade the secrets of life before such creatures as men? No! Life may be fleeting, but the beauty of life is not so lowly as all that, to be cast out into the public arena, for any man who comes along to trample under hoof!
« Last Edit: September 02, 2013, 01:07:57 PM by Asteriktos » Logged

Problem: John finds a spider under his bed. John eats the spider. John gets sick to his stomach.

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« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2013, 01:20:09 PM »

What is this claiming here, except that equal rights should be had by all women, and that men must yield to our power as women? Let us consider:

Open sky and trampling hooves,

Thus the stage is set. Men and their war mongering, destroying the beauty of earth and sky. Men, who cannot but indulge their wicked blood-lust. Their proclivity for violence knows no bounds. Why hooves, except to point that men are nothing but filthy animals, when not reigned in by the civilizing touch of women! Men would destroy all in their greed--for money, power and fame--if they were allowed to. There would be no escape from them. The continuous war cry of men echoes through the centuries: “from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs," by which is meant that each man gives what he is able on the battlefield, and in return his "need" for spoils are satiated if he can manage victory. He speaks of his greed and lust as a need! How perfectly male, how perfectly bourgeois.

Quote
O, this precious life of mine;

And so the lament of the forlorn woman continues. Men cannot fathom the true potential of life. They cannot understand the glory of existence. Nothing is precious to them except their [member]. And war and greed and all that consumes them are nothing but an extension of their [member]. The neurobiologic imperative is clear: men must constantly feed the ego of their [member] or perish. But of course, it is a slow, emasculating death. And for a man, who knows neither the wonders of equality, nor the equanimity of femininity, masculinity is all that he has. Yes, it is so poor a replacement as to be laughable. So impotent, so useless; to wit: so male. It is but an empty shell compared to womynhood, comared to the fragrance of the feminine. And as the poetess points out, it is for each women--"mine"! she owns it for herself!--to take what is rightfully hers, and avenge it upon the male twenty fold. This much is clear from the line quoted. I explain all of this for the young children who may be reading this poem for the first time. But what may not be so obvious is how to understand what comes next:

Quote
For the eternal curse of thirst,

What is meant by this? She is being sarcastic! Indeed, what can "eternal curse" here be speaking of except that oppressive, inane myth of the Judeo-Christian religious power, which says that our Mother Eve fell from grace, and manipulated the man. What can be more absurd? We all know that a woman would not be so easily deceived, and that it must have been the man, Adam, who fell. Then, by physical force, and in cooperation with the other beasts of the earth (represented by the serpent), they were able to force Eve to give up her rightful place, her divine destiny. Of course this story was written by men, so it makes men out to be the victims. Men are never the victims, even when they are the ones victimized! This is enough.

Quote
Caballine nectar is divine[/i]

And so we come to the end of this passage. What can we say here? The subtlety and sophistication of the line is breath-taking. Truly it is. What man could hope to match the depth of thought and breadth of experience manifested in this line? Capitalism must yield before the honor and power of such truths. But it is better to leave the main part here unsaid. I will not cast my pearls--all our pearls!--before swine. And that men are swine is axiomatic. We must leave such conversations for when it is only the [member-less] who are present, for some dastardly male may some day get his hands on this interpretation, and if a women has condescended to teach him to read--what then? Should we parade the secrets of life before such creatures as men? No! Life may be fleeting, but the beauty of life is not so lowly as all that, to be cast out into the public arena, for any man who comes along to trample under hoof!

Taking nothing at all away from your mellifluous exegesis, I have a question for you--Is it a blessing or an affliction to have too much spare time?  Wink
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« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2013, 01:35:27 PM »

What is this claiming here, except that equal rights should be had by all women, and that men must yield to our power as women? Let us consider:

Open sky and trampling hooves,

Thus the stage is set. Men and their war mongering, destroying the beauty of earth and sky. Men, who cannot but indulge their wicked blood-lust. Their proclivity for violence knows no bounds. Why hooves, except to point that men are nothing but filthy animals, when not reigned in by the civilizing touch of women! Men would destroy all in their greed--for money, power and fame--if they were allowed to. There would be no escape from them. The continuous war cry of men echoes through the centuries: “from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs," by which is meant that each man gives what he is able on the battlefield, and in return his "need" for spoils are satiated if he can manage victory. He speaks of his greed and lust as a need! How perfectly male, how perfectly bourgeois.

Quote
O, this precious life of mine;

And so the lament of the forlorn woman continues. Men cannot fathom the true potential of life. They cannot understand the glory of existence. Nothing is precious to them except their [member]. And war and greed and all that consumes them are nothing but an extension of their [member]. The neurobiologic imperative is clear: men must constantly feed the ego of their [member] or perish. But of course, it is a slow, emasculating death. And for a man, who knows neither the wonders of equality, nor the equanimity of femininity, masculinity is all that he has. Yes, it is so poor a replacement as to be laughable. So impotent, so useless; to wit: so male. It is but an empty shell compared to womynhood, comared to the fragrance of the feminine. And as the poetess points out, it is for each women--"mine"! she owns it for herself!--to take what is rightfully hers, and avenge it upon the male twenty fold. This much is clear from the line quoted. I explain all of this for the young children who may be reading this poem for the first time. But what may not be so obvious is how to understand what comes next:

Quote
For the eternal curse of thirst,

What is meant by this? She is being sarcastic! Indeed, what can "eternal curse" here be speaking of except that oppressive, inane myth of the Judeo-Christian religious power, which says that our Mother Eve fell from grace, and manipulated the man. What can be more absurd? We all know that a woman would not be so easily deceived, and that it must have been the man, Adam, who fell. Then, by physical force, and in cooperation with the other beasts of the earth (represented by the serpent), they were able to force Eve to give up her rightful place, her divine destiny. Of course this story was written by men, so it makes men out to be the victims. Men are never the victims, even when they are the ones victimized! This is enough.

Quote
Caballine nectar is divine[/i]

And so we come to the end of this passage. What can we say here? The subtlety and sophistication of the line is breath-taking. Truly it is. What man could hope to match the depth of thought and breadth of experience manifested in this line? Capitalism must yield before the honor and power of such truths. But it is better to leave the main part here unsaid. I will not cast my pearls--all our pearls!--before swine. And that men are swine is axiomatic. We must leave such conversations for when it is only the [member-less] who are present, for some dastardly male may some day get his hands on this interpretation, and if a women has condescended to teach him to read--what then? Should we parade the secrets of life before such creatures as men? No! Life may be fleeting, but the beauty of life is not so lowly as all that, to be cast out into the public arena, for any man who comes along to trample under hoof!


Okay, and your point...?

 Grin
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« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2013, 01:41:15 PM »

Ummmm

Kumiss... I've had it made with cow's milk long ago.  It wasn't bad.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kumiss


Caballine - related to horses.  Many places make Kumiss from mare's milk.  Never had that kind.

Of course with the interesting explication of the poem perhaps the Caballine Spring is intended to be part if this.  Also known as "Hippocrene" to drink of its water was to gain "poetic inspiration"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippocrene
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« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2013, 01:42:08 PM »

So does the OP have a source for mare's milk kumis?
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« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2013, 04:45:42 PM »

A+ on the literary critique.  Bonus points on trampling Judaeo-Christian tradition.  Bravo!

What is this claiming here, except that equal rights should be had by all women, and that men must yield to our power as women? Let us consider:

Open sky and trampling hooves,

Thus the stage is set. Men and their war mongering, destroying the beauty of earth and sky. Men, who cannot but indulge their wicked blood-lust. Their proclivity for violence knows no bounds. Why hooves, except to point that men are nothing but filthy animals, when not reigned in by the civilizing touch of women! Men would destroy all in their greed--for money, power and fame--if they were allowed to. There would be no escape from them. The continuous war cry of men echoes through the centuries: “from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs," by which is meant that each man gives what he is able on the battlefield, and in return his "need" for spoils are satiated if he can manage victory. He speaks of his greed and lust as a need! How perfectly male, how perfectly bourgeois.

Quote
O, this precious life of mine;

And so the lament of the forlorn woman continues. Men cannot fathom the true potential of life. They cannot understand the glory of existence. Nothing is precious to them except their [member]. And war and greed and all that consumes them are nothing but an extension of their [member]. The neurobiologic imperative is clear: men must constantly feed the ego of their [member] or perish. But of course, it is a slow, emasculating death. And for a man, who knows neither the wonders of equality, nor the equanimity of femininity, masculinity is all that he has. Yes, it is so poor a replacement as to be laughable. So impotent, so useless; to wit: so male. It is but an empty shell compared to womynhood, comared to the fragrance of the feminine. And as the poetess points out, it is for each women--"mine"! she owns it for herself!--to take what is rightfully hers, and avenge it upon the male twenty fold. This much is clear from the line quoted. I explain all of this for the young children who may be reading this poem for the first time. But what may not be so obvious is how to understand what comes next:

Quote
For the eternal curse of thirst,

What is meant by this? She is being sarcastic! Indeed, what can "eternal curse" here be speaking of except that oppressive, inane myth of the Judeo-Christian religious power, which says that our Mother Eve fell from grace, and manipulated the man. What can be more absurd? We all know that a woman would not be so easily deceived, and that it must have been the man, Adam, who fell. Then, by physical force, and in cooperation with the other beasts of the earth (represented by the serpent), they were able to force Eve to give up her rightful place, her divine destiny. Of course this story was written by men, so it makes men out to be the victims. Men are never the victims, even when they are the ones victimized! This is enough.

Quote
Caballine nectar is divine[/i]

And so we come to the end of this passage. What can we say here? The subtlety and sophistication of the line is breath-taking. Truly it is. What man could hope to match the depth of thought and breadth of experience manifested in this line? Capitalism must yield before the honor and power of such truths. But it is better to leave the main part here unsaid. I will not cast my pearls--all our pearls!--before swine. And that men are swine is axiomatic. We must leave such conversations for when it is only the [member-less] who are present, for some dastardly male may some day get his hands on this interpretation, and if a women has condescended to teach him to read--what then? Should we parade the secrets of life before such creatures as men? No! Life may be fleeting, but the beauty of life is not so lowly as all that, to be cast out into the public arena, for any man who comes along to trample under hoof!
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« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2013, 04:46:20 PM »

So does the OP have a source for mare's milk kumis?


Ah, yes.  Mongolia!  Or Uzbekistan.  It takes some time to get, though.
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« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2013, 04:49:24 PM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

Are you trying to say that horses are fruit?  Neigh, thou art mad.
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« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2013, 05:18:06 PM »

I had an opportunity to try kumis when I was living in China and I didn't take it... still kicking myself for it.
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« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2013, 05:29:29 PM »

Taking nothing at all away from your mellifluous exegesis, I have a question for you--Is it a blessing or an affliction to have too much spare time?  Wink

Actually I wish I would have taken a few minutes to edit it before posting. Now that I reread it I see at least a half dozen obvious mistakes, including at least two or three times when I said "women" instead of "woman." Anyway...  angel
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« Reply #21 on: September 03, 2013, 05:31:12 PM »

Open sky and trampling hooves,
O, this precious life of mine;
For the eternal curse of thirst,
Caballine nectar is divine


But the question remains...

What is best in life?
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« Reply #22 on: September 03, 2013, 05:51:10 PM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

Are you trying to say that horses are fruit?  Neigh, thou art mad.

OC.net is getting a lot of threads with silliness and gerrymandering ... How can you or most on here expect to be taken seriously?...
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« Reply #23 on: September 03, 2013, 05:54:37 PM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

Are you trying to say that horses are fruit?  Neigh, thou art mad.

OC.net is getting a lot of threads with silliness and gerrymandering ... How can you or most on here expect to be taken seriously?...

It's like a deadly game of freeze-tag- I touch you with the 44 mag and you're frozen inside a bodybag.
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« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2013, 05:58:35 PM »

How do you expect to be taken seriously?...
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« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2013, 06:04:01 PM »

How do you expect to be taken seriously?...

Describe the last time you were eaten by a walrus.
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« Reply #26 on: September 03, 2013, 06:11:30 PM »

How do you expect to be taken seriously?...

Describe the last time you were eaten by a walrus.

Something that happens when you trip on shrooms?...
« Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 06:11:50 PM by WPM » Logged
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« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2013, 06:13:52 PM »

How do you expect to be taken seriously?...

Describe the last time you were eaten by a walrus.

Something that happens when you trip on shrooms?...

I am not familiar with any study definitively linking the ingestion of hallucinogenic mushrooms with walrus predation. Remember, correlation is not causation.
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« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2013, 06:17:32 PM »

How do you expect to be taken seriously?...

Describe the last time you were eaten by a walrus.

Something that happens when you trip on shrooms?...

I am not familiar with any study definitively linking the ingestion of hallucinogenic mushrooms with walrus predation. Remember, correlation is not causation.

LOL  Huh ok.
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« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2013, 06:21:29 PM »

I had an opportunity to try kumis when I was living in China and I didn't take it... still kicking myself for it.

It could be essentially the same thing as milk-creamer that goes in your coffee.
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« Reply #30 on: September 03, 2013, 06:23:31 PM »

I had an opportunity to try kumis when I was living in China and I didn't take it... still kicking myself for it.

It could be essentially the same thing as milk-creamer that goes in your coffee.

Ogedei Khan didn't die of alcohol poisoning from drinking milk creamer, dude.
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« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2013, 06:25:30 PM »

Church Symposia, Russian chant, and Shrooms make a good combination
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« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2013, 07:19:14 PM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

Are you trying to say that horses are fruit?  Neigh, thou art mad.

OC.net is getting a lot of threads with silliness and gerrymandering ... How can you or most on here expect to be taken seriously?...
How can you expect to be taken seriously if you don't even know what gerrymandering is?
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« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2013, 07:21:21 PM »

Nectar is the ambrosia or liquid extract of fruit.

Are you trying to say that horses are fruit?  Neigh, thou art mad.

OC.net is getting a lot of threads with silliness and gerrymandering ... How can you or most on here expect to be taken seriously?...
How can you expect to be taken seriously if you don't even know what gerrymandering is?


Well, I could look it up in a dictionary.
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« Reply #34 on: September 03, 2013, 09:20:27 PM »

I had an opportunity to try kumis when I was living in China and I didn't take it... still kicking myself for it.

It could be essentially the same thing as milk-creamer that goes in your coffee.

Ogedei Khan didn't die of alcohol poisoning from drinking milk creamer, dude.

No, he died a champion of caballine nectar or ambrosia, if you will.
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« Reply #35 on: September 03, 2013, 11:32:15 PM »

How do you expect to be taken seriously?...

Describe the last time you were eaten by a walrus.

Something that happens when you trip on shrooms?...

And there I was expecting a more Jataka-like response.  Sad

I guess you don't remember your previous lives either, do you?
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« Reply #36 on: September 04, 2013, 08:46:58 PM »

How do you expect to be taken seriously?...

I only expect to be taken seriously when I write something serious (it does happen every now and then, much to my enormous surprise and against all my wishes for extreme silliness).  And sometimes, not even then.

Silly gerrymandered (gerrymandered??  yeah, I think you oughta look it up) threads are all part of life's great tapestry.  In fact, that same tapestry is hand-made with such threads.  Pick one, keep pulling on it, and you eventually get to where you are now, that is, oc.net Grin Grin
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« Reply #37 on: September 05, 2013, 08:58:52 AM »

How do you expect to be taken seriously?...

I only expect to be taken seriously when I write something serious (it does happen every now and then, much to my enormous surprise and against all my wishes for extreme silliness).  And sometimes, not even then.

Silly gerrymandered (gerrymandered??  yeah, I think you oughta look it up) threads are all part of life's great tapestry.  In fact, that same tapestry is hand-made with such threads.  Pick one, keep pulling on it, and you eventually get to where you are now, that is, oc.net Grin Grin

That is, by far, the most serious and lucid post I have ever come across on this forum.  Outstanding.  Thank you!
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« Reply #38 on: September 05, 2013, 02:48:29 PM »

Endless horizon coming forth,
Where betwixt the mountains lie
Verdant below and azure above;
As warriors of old, I shall die.
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« Reply #39 on: September 05, 2013, 02:54:45 PM »

Endless horizon coming forth,
Where betwixt the mountains lie
Verdant below and azure above;
As warriors of old, I shall die.


I would love to do an interpretation of this from my own perspective, but I don't think they'd allow it on this forum. I guess my interpretation of the second line as speaking of breasts might get a pass, but that third line? No way...  Grin angel
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« Reply #40 on: September 05, 2013, 02:56:23 PM »

Endless horizon coming forth,
Where betwixt the mountains lie
Verdant below and azure above;
As warriors of old, I shall die.


I would love to do an interpretation of this from my own perspective, but I don't think they'd allow it on this forum. I guess my interpretation of the second line as speaking of breasts might get a pass, but that third line? No way...  Grin angel

I...I'm afraid of your interpretation of the third line.   laugh 
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« Reply #41 on: September 05, 2013, 02:59:32 PM »

Well if the first line sets up the scene/image/tone, and the second line is about breasts (in the middle of the body, roughly), and the third line continues the sexual theme as it relates to a woman... what would something "verdant below" the breasts signify? See where I'm going with this?  angel
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« Reply #42 on: September 05, 2013, 03:03:16 PM »

Well if the first line sets up the scene/image/tone, and the second line is about breasts (in the middle of the body, roughly), and the third line continues the sexual theme as it relates to a woman... what would something "verdant below" the breasts signify? See where I'm going with this?  angel

Since we're going into a feminine mystique critique Roll Eyes, I suppose it could mean lush as a field of green or green as inexperienced.  But really, it's just grass and sky.  Grass and sky!  lolololol
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« Reply #43 on: September 05, 2013, 03:06:43 PM »

It's about a lush, vibrant thicket, with connotations of happiness and fullness of life. I am telling you!  Grin Tongue
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« Reply #44 on: September 05, 2013, 03:15:37 PM »

Tell me, what is the "endless horizon" in this context using this same critique?  You say that it sets the tone for this verse (or the poem itself[it's not finished]); how so?  I think that if you saw mountains as being figurative breasts, then perhaps the horizon is the whole form or body?  How does one interpret the last line of this verse, with this formula?
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« Reply #45 on: September 05, 2013, 03:55:44 PM »

Here's a clean version and sort of summary of what I would say:

Line 1 - It is not an ordinary horizon, but an endless one--one like you have never experienced, or have even imagined. Horizon here symbolizes something terribly beautiful, wide open, and awe-inspiring, but at the same time something that makes you feel utterly vulnerable from how exposed and unworthy you are standing before it. Yet, ready or not, here the horizons comes towards you ("coming forth")...

Line 2 - It is now sensed that it is a woman that is being spoken of. The beauty that you have tried to understand it now shown to be a valley between her breasts ("mountains"). It is important that it is not that which we sexualize (the breasts themselves) that are beautiful and remarkable; or not them alone, anyway. But this is perhaps still too literal. What does this mean, that the valley is more beautiful than the mountains? Perhaps that the bare middle of the chest, in its innocence, in its non-sensationalistic and non-overly-sexualized element, represents what is truly the center of the sexual act, the beautiful part, and what makes it truly enjoyable? Perhaps then it is not merely those things with which we sell porn using, and tell vulgar jokes about, that we should glorify, but the whole person? We are sexual beings, not sexual parts.

Line 3 - [I'll tread lightly here...]  Verdure ("Verdant") has very specific connotations for me, used as it is in Orthodox prayers about heaven and the afterlife, "where there is no sickness, sighing, etc." It is a word I now completely associate with life and joy and beauty. And if you take the word in that way, and think about the female body, below the breasts, when speaking of sexuality, well that's obviously [the female naughty lovely bits]. The azure above is perhaps a bit more difficult for my fictional (but completely sincere) interpretation, but off the top of my head I would say a pretty face, a royal face (regal colors), something that reminds you of a beautiful blue sky.

Line 4 - This could have several meanings, or rather does have several and many more I haven't thought of. (not that I have any clue what the original author truly meant) First, the beauty and awesome nature of it is enough to make you die, not literally, but in the same way that we speak of "spiritual deaths," that is to say, in a symbolic way. People are said to die from loneliness or heartbreak, but here the person dies a symbolic death from an overabundance of joy or love or beauty. He romanticizes (perhaps fairly, perhaps not) the past, when things were not so sexualized, when images and talk of sexuality had not yet permeated our culture, when there was a sense of the sacred, not simply of religious and divine things, but sacred in the sense that some things were better experienced than discussed in the open for all to hear. Perhaps he (I assume it is a he) thinks that this thing he is experiencing is what it might have been like in ancient times, before porn and dirty magazines and racy books and such began to prosper. We know that the ancients could be just as interested in that stuff, e.g. there was sexual graffiti and images on the walls of Pompeii, but would such over-sexualization have existed in most Christian cultures? Probably not. So like a spiritual warrior, defending the sacred and abiding by it, this fellow is getting to experience that which gives him an abundance of true contentment and pleasure, and maybe a glimmer of that beauty and awe that he had long hoped to experience and understand. That it took the form of a woman, with a discussion of sexuality--well why should that strike us as a strange thing? What is more beautiful or lovely?

(This turned out to be longer than I thought. And I was able to keep it cleaner than I thought I would be able to  angel )

EDIT--I hope I haven't done any harm here. I mean the above seriously, with sincerity, even if it shows me to be a bit odd. As I said, I do not know what the intended meaning was, though I'm pretty sure it wasn't close to my interpretation  angel I suppose many (most? all?) interpretations say more about the interpreters than they do the original material...
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« Reply #46 on: September 05, 2013, 04:10:02 PM »

Open sky and trampling hooves,
O, this precious life of mine;
For the eternal curse of thirst,
Caballine nectar is divine


But the question remains...

What is best in life?


The Divine Life; or life Imbued with spiritual energies

(ie) Experience of the divine life (All previous lives add to the current experience) ...
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« Reply #47 on: September 05, 2013, 05:04:03 PM »

The never-ending wonder of literary criticism.  It is vast!  Seriously, thank you.  Interpretation is subjective, but educational in the sense that although my interpretation was more literal, your interpretation lends more to the imagination.  And if you think yourself odd, then I'm odd too. Smiley
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« Reply #48 on: September 05, 2013, 05:38:27 PM »

Open sky and trampling hooves,
O, this precious life of mine;
For the eternal curse of thirst,
Caballine nectar is divine


But the question remains...

What is best in life?


The Divine Life; or life Imbued with spiritual energies

(ie) Experience of the divine life (All previous lives add to the current experience) ...
Lol, wut?  That's not what Conan said.
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« Reply #49 on: September 05, 2013, 09:55:19 PM »

The never-ending wonder of literary criticism.  It is vast!  Seriously, thank you.  Interpretation is subjective, but educational in the sense that although my interpretation was more literal, your interpretation lends more to the imagination.  And if you think yourself odd, then I'm odd too. Smiley

Do you wanna post yours, or do you fear what the soulless minions of orthodoxy 'round these parts would do to you?  angel
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« Reply #50 on: September 06, 2013, 09:58:45 PM »

Open sky and trampling hooves,
O, this precious life of mine;
For the eternal curse of thirst,
Caballine nectar is divine




Ha, soulless minions of orthodoxy were the impetus for this poem containing the phrase "caballine nectar."  Upon writing it, I wanted to convey a bit of sublimity.  I feel that we can only taste the sublime when we recognize that, as humans, we are very small.  So, to critique:

L1:  Open sky implies clarity and a full field of vision, something one is hard-pressed to find in an urban area.  In a way, it's a very optimistic view of what is ahead.  Trampling hooves does not indicate if there is merely one horse or many; one rider or a band.  It doesn't tell us if this(these) particular rider(s) are good or evil.  Optimistically, we hope good.  Realistically, we have no idea.  There is the unknown.
L2: This line would indicate that the speaker values his life.  Again, the unknown; we don't know why his life is precious or if it's just his life or all lives.  But I think the speaker recognizes his mortality, hence -
L3: thirst.  This is something all  humanity can recognize.  Our bodies can only bear this suffering for so long before death.  For some, death is the end of it all.  So why "eternal"?  The speaker recognizes that he knows there is more beyond his "precious life" of his.  Perhaps he fears that he will thirst in the beyond as well.
L4: Considering L1, we can assume that the speaker is the rider is the thirsty man.  To him, caballine or equine qualities can mean strength, hard work, and adventure rather than the slavish attitude of a draft horse.  If we take the phrase "caballine nectar" in its original intent as a funny name for Airag/kumis/fermented mare's milk, then we can assume this rider from anywhere throughout Central Asia/Mongolia and is part of the horse culture.  But let's keep it a mystery, as a man with no country and in no specific time to add to the endless unknown.  Nectar can be what makes life for the speaker to cure him of the eternal thirst.  Thirst for what?  For the divine.  So does he seek a god like him or does he seek God that made him?

I find it disheartening that 9.1% of the world's population (according the highly scientific poll) will not try caballine nectar.  That means 653,135,879.305 people in the world do not want to try this at all. Cry
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« Reply #51 on: September 08, 2013, 01:00:00 PM »

Here's a clean version and sort of summary of what I would say:

Line 1 - It is not an ordinary horizon, but an endless one--one like you have never experienced, or have even imagined. Horizon here symbolizes something terribly beautiful, wide open, and awe-inspiring, but at the same time something that makes you feel utterly vulnerable from how exposed and unworthy you are standing before it. Yet, ready or not, here the horizons comes towards you ("coming forth")...

Line 2 - It is now sensed that it is a woman that is being spoken of. The beauty that you have tried to understand it now shown to be a valley between her breasts ("mountains"). It is important that it is not that which we sexualize (the breasts themselves) that are beautiful and remarkable; or not them alone, anyway. But this is perhaps still too literal. What does this mean, that the valley is more beautiful than the mountains? Perhaps that the bare middle of the chest, in its innocence, in its non-sensationalistic and non-overly-sexualized element, represents what is truly the center of the sexual act, the beautiful part, and what makes it truly enjoyable? Perhaps then it is not merely those things with which we sell porn using, and tell vulgar jokes about, that we should glorify, but the whole person? We are sexual beings, not sexual parts.

Line 3 - [I'll tread lightly here...]  Verdure ("Verdant") has very specific connotations for me, used as it is in Orthodox prayers about heaven and the afterlife, "where there is no sickness, sighing, etc." It is a word I now completely associate with life and joy and beauty. And if you take the word in that way, and think about the female body, below the breasts, when speaking of sexuality, well that's obviously [the female naughty lovely bits]. The azure above is perhaps a bit more difficult for my fictional (but completely sincere) interpretation, but off the top of my head I would say a pretty face, a royal face (regal colors), something that reminds you of a beautiful blue sky.

Line 4 - This could have several meanings, or rather does have several and many more I haven't thought of. (not that I have any clue what the original author truly meant) First, the beauty and awesome nature of it is enough to make you die, not literally, but in the same way that we speak of "spiritual deaths," that is to say, in a symbolic way. People are said to die from loneliness or heartbreak, but here the person dies a symbolic death from an overabundance of joy or love or beauty. He romanticizes (perhaps fairly, perhaps not) the past, when things were not so sexualized, when images and talk of sexuality had not yet permeated our culture, when there was a sense of the sacred, not simply of religious and divine things, but sacred in the sense that some things were better experienced than discussed in the open for all to hear. Perhaps he (I assume it is a he) thinks that this thing he is experiencing is what it might have been like in ancient times, before porn and dirty magazines and racy books and such began to prosper. We know that the ancients could be just as interested in that stuff, e.g. there was sexual graffiti and images on the walls of Pompeii, but would such over-sexualization have existed in most Christian cultures? Probably not. So like a spiritual warrior, defending the sacred and abiding by it, this fellow is getting to experience that which gives him an abundance of true contentment and pleasure, and maybe a glimmer of that beauty and awe that he had long hoped to experience and understand. That it took the form of a woman, with a discussion of sexuality--well why should that strike us as a strange thing? What is more beautiful or lovely?

(This turned out to be longer than I thought. And I was able to keep it cleaner than I thought I would be able to  angel )

EDIT--I hope I haven't done any harm here. I mean the above seriously, with sincerity, even if it shows me to be a bit odd. As I said, I do not know what the intended meaning was, though I'm pretty sure it wasn't close to my interpretation  angel I suppose many (most? all?) interpretations say more about the interpreters than they do the original material...

You, a bit odd? Shocked  Never!! Grin
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« Reply #52 on: October 24, 2013, 02:21:48 PM »

Thus saith the master:
I seriously doubt that we have exhausted the well of discussion of Caballine Nectar.  It is time.

Onward, harrowed foot-soldiers!  Caballine nectar awaits!

On a lighter note, why is airag not more readily available?  Does fermented milk just weird Western folks out? 
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« Reply #53 on: October 24, 2013, 02:28:13 PM »

Thus saith the master:
I seriously doubt that we have exhausted the well of discussion of Caballine Nectar.  It is time.

Onward, harrowed foot-soldiers!  Caballine nectar awaits!

On a lighter note, why is airag not more readily available?  Does fermented milk just weird Western folks out? 

May God bless you, my Orthodox brother, with mightily abundant supplies of the finest and freshest caballine nectar!  I do believe the concept of fermented milk does weird out our Western brethren.  I fail to see why, however, as much else that they consume is a product of the fermentation process.  Perhaps it has something to do with it being of caballine origin.
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« Reply #54 on: October 24, 2013, 02:36:56 PM »

I would agree.  I bet if it were commercially viable, it would be done.  Dairy farms hook cows up to miling machines.  Mares need to be milked more often.  There has to be an easier way!  Well, here in the states, anyway, people are weirded about eating horsemeat.  That shouldn't be.  Note exhibit A:  http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,53263.msg986124.html#msg986124

I just don't think it's fair that I have to go all the way to Central Asia (quite expensive to get there) for some.
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« Reply #55 on: October 24, 2013, 02:48:40 PM »

I would agree.  I bet if it were commercially viable, it would be done.  Dairy farms hook cows up to miling machines.  Mares need to be milked more often.  There has to be an easier way!  Well, here in the states, anyway, people are weirded about eating horsemeat.  That shouldn't be.  Note exhibit A:  http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,53263.msg986124.html#msg986124

I just don't think it's fair that I have to go all the way to Central Asia (quite expensive to get there) for some.

Might I suggest a joint business venture?
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« Reply #56 on: October 24, 2013, 03:30:57 PM »

I would agree.  I bet if it were commercially viable, it would be done.  Dairy farms hook cows up to miling machines.  Mares need to be milked more often.  There has to be an easier way!  Well, here in the states, anyway, people are weirded about eating horsemeat.  That shouldn't be.  Note exhibit A:  http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,53263.msg986124.html#msg986124

I just don't think it's fair that I have to go all the way to Central Asia (quite expensive to get there) for some.

You may also want to check this out: http://www.horsemilk.org/  They will mail you powdered milk, but....hey...I know...just not the same. Sad
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« Reply #57 on: October 24, 2013, 04:25:13 PM »

No, it won't be the same.  I drank powdered milk a lot before, because you can have milk on-demand rather than go to the fridge and find out the gallon you bought is now bad.  But this is reassuring from the website:
Quote
horse milk can be preserved in a powdered form through drying technology, by the fact that its nutritional value has barely modified before and after drying.

Maybe something to look into, but it is 80 euro per kilo. Undecided
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« Reply #58 on: October 24, 2013, 04:30:27 PM »

No, it won't be the same.  I drank powdered milk a lot before, because you can have milk on-demand rather than go to the fridge and find out the gallon you bought is now bad.  But this is reassuring from the website:
Quote
horse milk can be preserved in a powdered form through drying technology, by the fact that its nutritional value has barely modified before and after drying.

Maybe something to look into, but it is 80 euro per kilo. Undecided

I know, but...what's the price of a return flight to Mongolia these days??
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"May Thy Cross, O Lord, in which I seek refuge, be for me a bridge across the great river of fire.  May I pass along it to the habitation of life." ~St. Ephraim the Syrian
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« Reply #59 on: October 24, 2013, 04:40:56 PM »

If I were to leave tomorrow, a round-trip ticket from LAX for a week would cost $1467.  No lie.  Not including visa, taxes, and all that jazz.  I wonder how much shipping is.
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