Author Topic: Saint Philonides of Kourion  (Read 515 times)

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Offline Ansgar

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Saint Philonides of Kourion
« on: August 30, 2013, 01:53:24 PM »
I read this today:
http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2013/08/the-noble-suicide-of-saint-philonides.html

Now, I don't really have a problem with the suicide part. I can see  the logic in that part, but there is one thing about this story that I find peculiar. Unless there exists another meaning of the word, it has always been my impression that satyrs were mythological creatures. Does anybody know anything about this?

Thank you.
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Offline Gunnarr

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Re: Saint Philonides of Kourion
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2013, 09:35:38 PM »
this reminds me of another saint and her daughters, who she drowned along with her in order to prevent their being raped

i can go write it here if you want, but it is commentary by st. john chrysostom
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Offline podkarpatska

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Re: Saint Philonides of Kourion
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2013, 09:45:50 PM »
I read this today:
http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2013/08/the-noble-suicide-of-saint-philonides.html

Now, I don't really have a problem with the suicide part. I can see  the logic in that part, but there is one thing about this story that I find peculiar. Unless there exists another meaning of the word, it has always been my impression that satyrs were mythological creatures. Does anybody know anything about this?

Thank you.

I found this re:satyr : "This noun can also be used metaphorically for a man whose sexual desire is stronger than his sense of decency." https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/satyr
« Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 09:46:25 PM by podkarpatska »

Offline Shanghaiski

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Re: Saint Philonides of Kourion
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2013, 10:24:06 PM »
Given that these were pagans, they were probably men dressed as the mythical creatures, along with the above meaning.
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Offline hecma925

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Re: Saint Philonides of Kourion
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2013, 08:42:23 AM »
Could they have been the pagan temple prostitutes?  Temple gigolos?
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Offline Ansgar

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Re: Saint Philonides of Kourion
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2013, 10:29:00 AM »
I read this today:
http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2013/08/the-noble-suicide-of-saint-philonides.html

Now, I don't really have a problem with the suicide part. I can see  the logic in that part, but there is one thing about this story that I find peculiar. Unless there exists another meaning of the word, it has always been my impression that satyrs were mythological creatures. Does anybody know anything about this?

Thank you.

I found this re:satyr : "This noun can also be used metaphorically for a man whose sexual desire is stronger than his sense of decency." https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/satyr
That makes sense.
Do not be cast down over the struggle - the Lord loves a brave warrior. The Lord loves the soul that is valiant.

-St Silouan the athonite