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Author Topic: Croatian convert question  (Read 516 times) Average Rating: 0
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Adela
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« on: August 26, 2013, 02:58:17 PM »

I am curious to find out how a 2nd generation American of Croatian descent, who has converted from Catholicism to Orthodoxy, would be viewed in a Serbian Orthodox church in America.     Is this ethnicity something to keep quiet or would Serbian Orthodox in America be wise/kind enough not to scapegoat one person for all the unfortunate troubles that have happened between these two groups?   
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LizaSymonenko
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« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2013, 03:05:44 PM »


They should be tolerant and happy to have you join them.

My Ukrainian parish, has many, many Russians in attendance.  While we may be suspicious of Russia, we welcome these people with open arms.  The only stumbling block is communication....but, we eventually figure out a middle ground where we repeat the same sentences many different ways, until the other understands. Smiley

The Serbs ought to welcome you, as well!

It's only Christian to welcome anyone who comes to worship God, regardless of ethnicity, or history.
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« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2013, 03:10:47 PM »

It might be not wise to start discussions about politics or history, though...
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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2013, 03:11:06 PM »

Coffee hours might turn out interesting though. angel

Are there any other differences between Croats and Serbs besides religion?
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 03:13:35 PM by Alpo » Logged
LizaSymonenko
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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2013, 03:13:45 PM »

It might be not wise to start discussions about politics or history, though...

Seriously...if politics comes up....just state that you were never interested in politics and know little of the history between the nations.

Sometimes, acting stupid, and avoiding conflict is best.....until they get to know and love you....and then you can discuss, at will, without estranging them.
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Conquer evil men by your gentle kindness, and make zealous men wonder at your goodness. Put the lover of legality to shame by your compassion. With the afflicted be afflicted in mind. Love all men, but keep distant from all men.
—St. Isaac of Syria
ialmisry
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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2013, 03:34:39 PM »

I am curious to find out how a 2nd generation American of Croatian descent, who has converted from Catholicism to Orthodoxy, would be viewed in a Serbian Orthodox church in America.     Is this ethnicity something to keep quiet or would Serbian Orthodox in America be wise/kind enough not to scapegoat one person for all the unfortunate troubles that have happened between these two groups?   
I remember when one such person was chrismated. "So, are you a Serb now?" I asked.  "No, no" he shook his head in disapproval.

I'm not Serbian, but I've known a lot.  I don't imagine they will make it an issue.
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                           and both come out of your mouth
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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2013, 03:36:56 PM »

I don't imagine they will make it an issue.

My friend once witnessed a fistfight between a Greek and Macedonian after Liturgy at some church. Just saying...
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 03:37:32 PM by Michał Kalina » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2013, 04:05:34 PM »

I am curious to find out how a 2nd generation American of Croatian descent, who has converted from Catholicism to Orthodoxy, would be viewed in a Serbian Orthodox church in America.     Is this ethnicity something to keep quiet or would Serbian Orthodox in America be wise/kind enough not to scapegoat one person for all the unfortunate troubles that have happened between these two groups?   
I remember when one such person was chrismated. "So, are you a Serb now?" I asked.  "No, no" he shook his head in disapproval.

I'm not Serbian, but I've known a lot.  I don't imagine they will make it an issue.

You might to deliver this memo for Israeli Greeks and Armenians.
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« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2013, 04:05:45 PM »


They should be tolerant and happy to have you join them.

My Ukrainian parish, has many, many Russians in attendance.  While we may be suspicious of Russia, we welcome these people with open arms.  The only stumbling block is communication....but, we eventually figure out a middle ground where we repeat the same sentences many different ways, until the other understands. Smiley

The Serbs ought to welcome you, as well!

It's only Christian to welcome anyone who comes to worship God, regardless of ethnicity, or history.


Not to derail this thread..., but how is communication a problem between Russians and Ukrainians?
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LizaSymonenko
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« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2013, 04:19:21 PM »


The languages are different, even though both use Cyrillic alphabet.

There are some words that are the same, but, others that are completely different.

Therefore, if you don't wish to understand the other party, you can claim you don't.

If you wish to understand, but, don't....you simply keep trying and eventually you will hit upon a word that both understand.

Let me give you an example.  When I visited Kharkiv, in very very eastern part of Ukraine (....really close to Russia), they spoke mostly Russian as most inhabitants were native Russians who settled in Ukraine.  They were actually hostile to us, because we spoke Ukrainian.  Mind you this was many years ago, and I hope it has changed.

At the hotel I approached the front desk and asked for a bottle of water in Ukrainian.  The girl looked back at me and shook her head.  I asked it in English.  Nope, nothing.  I asked it in Ukrainian using different words.  Plyashka (bottle) vody, stakan (glass) vody...of water....nothing.  I finally remembered one of the words my dad used when I was a kid and asked for a Bootilka vody...and voila!  She finally "got" it.  She knew all along what I wanted.  Voda is Voda is water....she had to understand I wanted water, but, chose not to understand.

When I speak with our Russian parishioners, if I don't understand something, I always make a quizzical face and start squinting one eye...and they will try it another way...until I get what they are saying.  I can usually get the gist, but, miss the finer details. 

I'm slowly picking up more Russian, and it's becoming easier, but, if both parties are willing, there's really no issues in communicating.  It's the will, that's the problem.
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Conquer evil men by your gentle kindness, and make zealous men wonder at your goodness. Put the lover of legality to shame by your compassion. With the afflicted be afflicted in mind. Love all men, but keep distant from all men.
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Putnik Namernik
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« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2013, 05:39:46 PM »

I am curious to find out how a 2nd generation American of Croatian descent, who has converted from Catholicism to Orthodoxy, would be viewed in a Serbian Orthodox church in America.     Is this ethnicity something to keep quiet or would Serbian Orthodox in America be wise/kind enough not to scapegoat one person for all the unfortunate troubles that have happened between these two groups?   
Dear Adela
There are Coats who attend Liturgy at my parish. I believe some have converted while others night have not. Many of then have married Serbs. Some of them are devout believers and have made special effort to come when Kursk icon was in our city. Their will always be individuals who will complicate things or try to create problems...the reason why come might make such a comment is because many Ser.bs have been forced to become Roman Catholics and then eventually Coats. Nevertheless such comments are unnecessary and not welcoming. Please advise your friend to be brave and not be discouraged. If there are some more personal questions you can PM me, I will be more than happy till help.
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Putnik Namernik
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« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2013, 05:51:13 PM »

I am sorry , I had autorect function turned on my device .sio some words came out spellsed incorrect ly.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 05:54:24 PM by Putnik Namernik » Logged
ialmisry
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« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2013, 06:47:20 PM »

I don't imagine they will make it an issue.

My friend once witnessed a fistfight between a Greek and Macedonian after Liturgy at some church. Just saying...
That's a different issue...with different peoples.
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Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Hypatos
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« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2013, 06:54:38 PM »

I am curious to find out how a 2nd generation American of Croatian descent, who has converted from Catholicism to Orthodoxy, would be viewed in a Serbian Orthodox church in America.     Is this ethnicity something to keep quiet or would Serbian Orthodox in America be wise/kind enough not to scapegoat one person for all the unfortunate troubles that have happened between these two groups?   
I remember when one such person was chrismated. "So, are you a Serb now?" I asked.  "No, no" he shook his head in disapproval.

I'm not Serbian, but I've known a lot.  I don't imagine they will make it an issue.

You might to deliver this memo for Israeli Greeks and Armenians.
another different issue...with different peoples.
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Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
Gorazd
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« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2013, 06:57:49 PM »

Actually, in Zagreb, there are Orthodox parishes both under the Serbian and under the Bulgarian patriarchate. The one under the Bulgarian patriarchate specifically insists on a Croatian identity.

Anyway, in a Swerbian parish,a Croatian convert would usually be warmly welcomed. They will indeed feel like you somehow "joined" them.
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Putnik Namernik
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« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2013, 08:42:38 PM »

Gorazd, could you pm me about those Bulgarian parishes....I have never heard of them. THANKS
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