OrthodoxChristianity.net
July 25, 2014, 12:28:15 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Daily Prayers  (Read 649 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
MagdaleneLights
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7



« on: August 25, 2013, 09:17:33 PM »

Hey everyone, I recently purchased the book 'An Orthodox Prayerbook' which is compiled by Fr. Michael Monos, I don't know how popular the book is? Regardless, it contains, among other prayers, the daily prayers, as in, morning prayers, the hours, so on... The layout however confuses me! It does not seem to separate prayer-by-prayer, but says 'Morning Prayers' and I am uncertain when one payer ends and the next begins. I will type out the Morning Prayers section, and perhaps, if it would not be too much trouble and you would be kind, being that I do not know the prayers myself, you could tell me how to recognise when they stop and when they begin? I do not want to assume that they stop simply at 'Amen', but... Well, I'm babbling - thankyou. Here's the text:

"In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Glory to you, our God, glory to you!

Holy King, comforter, Spirit of truth, who are present everywhere filling all things, Treasury of good things and Giver of life, come and dwell in us, Cleanse us of every stain, and save our souls, Gracious lord.

Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holly Immortal, have mercy on us! (x3)

Glory to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit, now and forever and to the ages of ages. Amen.

All-Holy Trinity, have mercy on us. Lord, forgive our sins. Master, pardon our transgressions. Holy One, visit and heal our infirmities for the glory of Your name.

Lord, have mercy. (x3) Glory to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Now and forever and to the ages of ages. Amen.

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed by thy name. Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.

Through the prayers of our Holy Fathers, Lord Jesus Christ our God, have mercy upon us and save us. Amen.

Having risen from sleep, we fall down before you, O good One, and sing to you, mighty One, the angelic hymn: Holy, holy, holy are you, O God! Through the prayers of the Theotokos, have mercy on us.

Glory to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy spirit

Having aroused me from sleep and bed, O Lord, enlighten my mind and open my heart and lips that I may sing to you, Holy, holy, holy are you, O God! Through the prayers of the Theotokos, now and forever and to the ages of ages. Amen.

Suddenly the judge will come and everyone's deeds will be revealed. But with fear we cry out in the middle of the night: Holy, holy, holy are you, O God, through the prayers of the Theotokos, have mercy on us!

Lord, have mercy. (x12)"

To highlight my confusion, there seems to me to be several ways of separating the prayers used! It says Amen many times, first. And so I had thought perhaps after each Amen it was a separate prayer, or else one very long prayer. But, then later, the first letters of some paragraphs appear oversized (which I have indicated in bold), as in the beginning of the prayers - so I thought, surely, then the first is a long prayer, and the others separate prayers? But the last three are really all the same prayer, describing a rising in the morning and ending with the trisagion. But I am confused, basically.

Thankyou so much for your help!
Logged
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,124



« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2013, 09:45:42 PM »

Hey everyone, I recently purchased the book 'An Orthodox Prayerbook' which is compiled by Fr. Michael Monos, I don't know how popular the book is? Regardless, it contains, among other prayers, the daily prayers, as in, morning prayers, the hours, so on... The layout however confuses me! It does not seem to separate prayer-by-prayer, but says 'Morning Prayers' and I am uncertain when one payer ends and the next begins. I will type out the Morning Prayers section, and perhaps, if it would not be too much trouble and you would be kind, being that I do not know the prayers myself, you could tell me how to recognise when they stop and when they begin? I do not want to assume that they stop simply at 'Amen', but... Well, I'm babbling - thankyou. Here's the text:

"In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Glory to you, our God, glory to you!

Holy King, comforter, Spirit of truth, who are present everywhere filling all things, Treasury of good things and Giver of life, come and dwell in us, Cleanse us of every stain, and save our souls, Gracious lord.

Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holly Immortal, have mercy on us! (x3)

Glory to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit, now and forever and to the ages of ages. Amen.

All-Holy Trinity, have mercy on us. Lord, forgive our sins. Master, pardon our transgressions. Holy One, visit and heal our infirmities for the glory of Your name.

Lord, have mercy. (x3) Glory to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Now and forever and to the ages of ages. Amen.

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed by thy name. Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.

Through the prayers of our Holy Fathers, Lord Jesus Christ our God, have mercy upon us and save us. Amen.

Having risen from sleep, we fall down before you, O good One, and sing to you, mighty One, the angelic hymn: Holy, holy, holy are you, O God! Through the prayers of the Theotokos, have mercy on us.

Glory to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy spirit

Having aroused me from sleep and bed, O Lord, enlighten my mind and open my heart and lips that I may sing to you, Holy, holy, holy are you, O God! Through the prayers of the Theotokos, now and forever and to the ages of ages. Amen.

Suddenly the judge will come and everyone's deeds will be revealed. But with fear we cry out in the middle of the night: Holy, holy, holy are you, O God, through the prayers of the Theotokos, have mercy on us!

Lord, have mercy. (x12)"

To highlight my confusion, there seems to me to be several ways of separating the prayers used! It says Amen many times, first. And so I had thought perhaps after each Amen it was a separate prayer, or else one very long prayer. But, then later, the first letters of some paragraphs appear oversized (which I have indicated in bold), as in the beginning of the prayers - so I thought, surely, then the first is a long prayer, and the others separate prayers? But the last three are really all the same prayer, describing a rising in the morning and ending with the trisagion. But I am confused, basically.

Thankyou so much for your help!
I'm not sure of the question here.

I've not heard of the book, but that doesn't mean anything.  The prayers you typed here are found in most Orthodox prayerbooks for the Morning Prayers, although the translation here is a little off (it should be "Heavenly King" in the beginning). it should be "....through the prayers of the Theotokos have mercy on us!  Now and ever and unto the ages of ages." There should be at the end of the series of prayers "Through the prayers of our holy Fathers, Lord Jesus Christ Our God, have mercy on us and save us!"

The prayers are said in succession.  Such that often they are not labeled separately.
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
MagdaleneLights
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7



« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2013, 09:47:49 PM »

Ahhhh, okay okay okay. So you say the whole thing? Right. That's all I needed to know, really. I was just confused. I am not used to this type of praying, is all. Thankyou very much!
Logged
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,124



« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2013, 09:54:09 PM »

here's the same prayers from the Antiochian Archdiocese:
http://www.antiochian.org/morning-prayers

The Greek Archdiocese
http://www.goarch.org/chapel/liturgical_texts/daily_prayers

The OCA
http://oca.org/orthodoxy/prayers

http://oca.org/orthodoxy/prayers/trisagion
http://oca.org/orthodoxy/prayers/morning-prayers

As you can see, they all differ so slightly, but that doesn't matter.
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,124



« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2013, 10:01:23 PM »

Ahhhh, okay okay okay. So you say the whole thing? Right. That's all I needed to know, really. I was just confused. I am not used to this type of praying, is all. Thankyou very much!
No problem.  The ones from "In the Name of the Father...." to the Lord's Prayer, the 12 "Lord have mercy!" then should be followed by "Come, Let us worship God Our King!"
Come, Let us worship and fall down before Christ, Our King and Our God!
Come, Let us worship and fall down before Christ Himself, Our King and Our God!" with crossings and prostrations after each line.

These are called the "Introductory Prayers."  They open every service.

THEN, in the morning prayers, should "Having arisen from sleep...." follow, and "through the prayers of our holy Fathers..." conclude the prayers.

Are you coming from a non-Orthodox background?
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
MagdaleneLights
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7



« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2013, 03:34:29 AM »

Ahhhh okay. So I should pray those opening prayers at every point of the day?

And, yeah, I'm coming from a non-religious background, so prayer et al is new to me.
Logged
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,124



« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2013, 07:10:20 AM »

Ahhhh okay. So I should pray those opening prayers at every point of the day?
Not absolutely necessary, but good training.  The idea is to put you into the frame of mind of prayer.  And we all (Orthodox) share them, so it is a communal thing, praying with the Church, even when you are alone.
And, yeah, I'm coming from a non-religious background, so prayer et al is new to me.
Don't try to over do it: I asked because we had a sermon on that.  Yesterday was the reading of Christ walking on the water, and St. Peter commanding Him to command him to come out on the water: after a few steps he "saw the winds" (which you can't see), panicked, and began to sink.  A lot of people new to Orthodoxy decide to try to outdo the monks of Athos in their rule of prayer, only to sink like St. Peter.

St. Theophan the Recluse had some good points on working at prayer:
http://www.orthodoxprayer.org/Theophan-Prayer.html
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
MagdaleneLights
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7



« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2013, 11:35:48 AM »

Ahhhh, thank you so much for this, this is very very helpful. And I know exactly what you mean. I am prone to great fits of excitement when thinking of holy things and I think my ambition is far too serious. I'm reminded of the Leonard Cohen song 'Avalance' where he sings, 'Do not love me quite so fiercely now, I know that you are not sure.'
Logged
LizaSymonenko
Слава Ісусу Христу!!! Glory to Jesus Christ!!!
Global Moderator
Toumarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: God's Holy Catholic and Apostolic Orthodox Church
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the U.S.A.
Posts: 12,592



WWW
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2013, 11:54:59 AM »


Welcome to the Forum, MagdaleneLights!

It's good to have you here!

I hope you learn much, and make many new friends, who will be willing to gently answer any and all your questions!

Welcome!!!

Logged

Conquer evil men by your gentle kindness, and make zealous men wonder at your goodness. Put the lover of legality to shame by your compassion. With the afflicted be afflicted in mind. Love all men, but keep distant from all men.
—St. Isaac of Syria
MagdaleneLights
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7



« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2013, 12:15:31 AM »

Thankyou very much Liza! It has helped me exhaustively already! It is all an all and honour to be here to sit among you wise Christians.

And, thanks to whomever moved the question for me. I was not really sure where to put it - issues of prayer were not necessarily those of conversion, but, the thread of talking lead it that way, so...
Logged
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,124



« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2013, 12:47:14 AM »

Thankyou very much Liza! It has helped me exhaustively already! It is all an all and honour to be here to sit among you wise Christians.
LOL.  Plural?  Liza is the only wise Christian who has posted on this thread.
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
MagdaleneLights
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7



« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2013, 07:28:39 AM »

Oh you humble soul!

Actually, you know, I just realised, what you were saying about St. Peter, it reminds me of one my early spiritual explorations at the beginning of this year when we were still seized by the cold hands of winter, I began St. Ignatius' Spiritual Exercises (which I had heard trained the imagination such that the image of Christ upon the cross could be held in the mind so well that the student would develop the stigmata on her own hands), and I had not considered my ill health (my condition leaves me often bedridden among other things) and I had leapt into the practice and spent over five hours a day in rigorous prayer and meditation, and after the first week I collapsed and had to be taken to spend several nights in hospital. So, I have been where old Peter was, I believe!
« Last Edit: August 27, 2013, 07:29:44 AM by MagdaleneLights » Logged
Thomas
Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,753



« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2013, 01:01:57 PM »

MagdaleneLights

Think of those as the Introductory prayers for each set of prayers that you begin to recite. They form the basic liturgy for each paryer setting morning, noon,evening, compline, and midnight prayers that many Orthodox Christians say throughout the day. Monastics even do a set of prayers called "the Hours" that include these opening prayers that are read as a set before the specific prayers for the  type of homeprayers or monastic prayers are said. They also begin the prayers for Thanskgiving after Communion and The Prayers before communion.

Many Orthodox Christians learn these prayers by heart because they do them so often during the day.

Welcome to the Convert Issues Forum!
Thomas
Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.066 seconds with 40 queries.