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Author Topic: Take me to school: The Icon Corner  (Read 2083 times) Average Rating: 0
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AV
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« on: July 24, 2013, 12:32:39 PM »

There were a multitude of threads on this, but most were laden with specific questions about this icon, or that icon, etc. For a new person, it wasn't overly informative.

Why a corner, or is that just a clever term?

What is traditionally present? There are a ton of variations in pictures.

What is their primary purpose?

Is it something that should be vetted and blessed by your priest?

Is there an area of the home that is preferred?

Is N,S,E,W an issue?

Are the icon choices personal or is there a specific order?

Thank you for taking the time to answer questions you probably have a million times over.  Smiley
« Last Edit: July 24, 2013, 12:33:57 PM by AV » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2013, 12:52:08 PM »

Why a corner, or is that just a clever term?

Corners are just more practical, I suppose. There's no need for it to be a corner.

Quote
What is traditionally present? There are a ton of variations in pictures.

Besides the icons, usually a Bible, a cross, prayer books, some kind of candle/oil lamp, and a censer. Basically anything you might use while saying your prayer rule at home.

Quote
What is their primary purpose?

To help you pray.

Quote
Is it something that should be vetted and blessed by your priest?

No. However, it's common, though not necessary, to bring icons to church to be blessed before putting them up at home.

Quote
Is N,S,E,W an issue?

Christians pray facing east. However, if there's no appropriate east-facing wall, you may have it somewhere else, south being the next best option, and west the last.

Quote
Are the icon choices personal or is there a specific order?

If possible, you should have Christ, His Mother, John the Baptist, and your patron saint. Beyond that it's up to you.
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« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2013, 01:04:32 PM »

Excellent reply! It doesn't get more concise than that. I really appreciate the response.
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« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2013, 02:55:12 PM »

Orthodox11,

I've never heard that, if East wasn't an option, the order of preference is South, North, and West.  Why South over North? 
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« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2013, 03:02:04 PM »


I'm interested, too.  I've never heard any direction ever mentioned, other than East.

...although my church faces West.  Shocking, isn't it?

Couldn't be helped.  City zoning.
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« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2013, 04:08:31 PM »

Fwiw I'll throw my two cents in. I would guess that any differences between my post and what has already been said involves differences of custom, and aren't significant...

Why a corner, or is that just a clever term?

Doesn't have to be a corner, for some that just works out to be the best place. I've found it easier to locate a corner facing roughly east than a wall, but your experience may differ.

Quote
What is traditionally present? There are a ton of variations in pictures.

Icons, books (Bible, prayer), perhaps a prayer rope, holy water, cross, perhaps a few other things.

Quote
What is their primary purpose?

Prayer, but also contemplation of God. You don't have to pray, sometimes it can just be a place to gather your thoughts, to stand in silence, to give thanks, etc.

Quote
Is it something that should be vetted and blessed by your priest?

That would depend on a lot of factors, including what your relationship with your priest is and whether it would be beneficial to have assistance. Presumably the priest will bless your entire home at some point within a year's time of starting it.

Quote
Is there an area of the home that is preferred?

Not the bathroom.  Grin  Some like in a main room, especially if they have a family and want everyone to gather around or use it whatever going into someone's private space. As long as it's a respectable space though (e.g. not in the basement with millipedes crawling over it) I would guess that it's ok.

Quote
Is N,S,E,W an issue?

I've always heard make it as easterly as possible, a practice (prayer towards the east) going back to the ancient Church.

Quote
Are the icon choices personal or is there a specific order?

Beyond the fundamental ones mentioned, I would agree that it's largely a choice. Your family may also have a patron, or you may select the patron of your parish, or just this or that saint because their story was instructive or inspirational or whatever.
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« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2013, 04:17:27 PM »

I've never heard that, if East wasn't an option, the order of preference is South, North, and West.  Why South over North? 

I suppose just the movement of the sun. South = light, north = darkness.
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« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2013, 04:20:20 PM »

Perhaps also because invaders of Israel came from the North, and I believe the Apocalypse mentions the "king of the North."
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« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2013, 06:44:17 PM »

People overthink everything.  Tongue
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« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2013, 07:16:12 PM »

I've never heard that, if East wasn't an option, the order of preference is South, North, and West.  Why South over North? 

I suppose just the movement of the sun. South = light, north = darkness.

Then it would have to be the opposite for those living in the southern hemisphere. Mor is right - some things are overthought here.
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« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2013, 07:40:56 PM »

Luckily East is easy for me to accommidate and pretty clear cut with the Church traditions from my own reading....moving on.

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« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2013, 07:43:42 PM »

Then it would have to be the opposite for those living in the southern hemisphere. Mor is right - some things are overthought here.

Those guys have Christmas in the summer and Pascha in the autumn, they don't count Tongue

I was going to say something about south-east being the direction of Jerusalem, but I thought that was pushing the eurocentrism a bit too far.
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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2013, 10:20:09 PM »

Some of what I'm going to say is rehashing, but I hope some complements others' replies.

Why a corner, or is that just a clever term?

IDK why it's called a corner honestly, since it seems a lot of people don't even put them into corners and use a wall/desk/shelf/etc nowhere near the corner.

Quote
What is traditionally present? There are a ton of variations in pictures.

Are the icon choices personal or is there a specific order?

As mentioned, the major icons are Christ, Mary, and your patron saint. St. John the Baptist is common too. I'm not sure about traditionally, but it seems many differ on preference or local custom. Three basic models I've noticed are:

1) A cross or crucifix in the center (sometimes upper center), with the icon Christ to the right and the Theotokos to the left. Mine follows this model.

2) Icons of Christ and Mary side-by-side (Christ-right, Mary-left), with icons surrounding. Sometimes a cross above, top-center.

3) A Madonna and Child icon in the center, with smaller icons of Mary and Christ (left and right sides respectively). Again, sometimes a cross above, top-center.

Also, it seems I notice St. John the Baptist's icon on the right side most often IME. People often include Trinitarian icons in the top-center, e.g. above the cross or something. An interesting aside is that people seem to often put their palm leaves behind, or against, their icons. Some people will include and rotate festal icons. Otherwise, just add whatever you like I guess.

Beyond icons - Bible, prayer book(s), Psalter, candles/oil lamps, censer, prayer ropes/rosaries, holy water/oil, etc. Pretty much anything and everything devotional. Some people (like myself) include decorative statuary. If using a shelf or something as well, some people will incorporate cloths. I know other people include pictures of (deceased) loved ones, and sometimes images of inspirational religious figures.

Quote
Is there an area of the home that is preferred?

As others said, an Eastern-facing wall or corner is ideal. People will also sometimes choose the first visible corner or wall, so that the icon corner is immediately seen upon entering the house.
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« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2013, 10:32:57 PM »

Why a corner, or is that just a clever term?

IDK why it's called a corner honestly, since it seems a lot of people don't even put them into corners and use a wall/desk/shelf/etc nowhere near the corner.

Is the "corner" more of a Slavic thing?  I've seen icons actually in the corners exclusively among Slavs.  If anyone else has done it, it's usually because there are too many icons for one wall and they're migrating.  YMMV. 

Quote
Some people (like myself) include decorative statuary.

I just vomited in my mouth.  Tongue 
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« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2013, 10:35:23 PM »

IDK why it's called a corner honestly, since it seems a lot of people don't even put them into corners and use a wall/desk/shelf/etc nowhere near the corner.

Is the "corner" more of a Slavic thing?  I've seen icons actually in the corners exclusively among Slavs.  If anyone else has done it, it's usually because there are too many icons for one wall and they're migrating.  YMMV.

That's actually what I was thinking as well, but my experience is too limited. Maybe LBK can chime in here. Tongue

Quote
Quote
Some people (like myself) include decorative statuary.

I just vomited in my mouth.  Tongue  

Hey, now, I like my statues.
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« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2013, 11:15:49 PM »

I've never heard that, if East wasn't an option, the order of preference is South, North, and West.  Why South over North? 

I suppose just the movement of the sun. South = light, north = darkness.

Never heard that. AFAIK, the only direction of darkness is of a spiritual sort, west, because that's the direction in which we spit on Satan at baptism, but more I think because it happens to be opposite of east.
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« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2013, 11:50:32 PM »

...but more I think because it happens to be opposite of east.

Either that, or if the church is facing east then the door is in the west, and they want you to spit out the door so you're not spitting on their good hardwood floors  angel
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« Reply #17 on: July 25, 2013, 02:26:47 AM »

IDK why it's called a corner honestly, since it seems a lot of people don't even put them into corners and use a wall/desk/shelf/etc nowhere near the corner.

Is the "corner" more of a Slavic thing?  I've seen icons actually in the corners exclusively among Slavs.  If anyone else has done it, it's usually because there are too many icons for one wall and they're migrating.  YMMV.

That's actually what I was thinking as well, but my experience is too limited. Maybe LBK can chime in here. Tongue

There are two customs to consider: the hanging of an icon in the corner of most rooms in the house, and where the "prayer space" where a "collection" of icons and other devotional items are located. The former custom is overwhelmingly a Slavic custom, Greeks and others might have a single icon hanging somewhere in the house, separate from the icon corner.

In my experience, I've not seen any hard-and-fast preference for corners or not, I've seen plenty of examples of both. Corner shelves, inside bookcases, tops of cupboards or dressers, wall-mounted house-shaped wooden "shrines", you name it.
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« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2013, 05:13:05 PM »

The reason I heard that corners became tradition is because (reminder, this is what I've heard) it was a Russian belief (maybe superstition? IDK, the babas tend to know more than me so I don't want to dismiss it out of hand too quickly) that evil spirits lingered in corners where the light didn't hit, the spot ignored and where dirt collected. Thus Icons were hung in corners to expel the spirits, and because they had to be hung somewhere.

Of course it also serves two other purposes: Theologically it reminds people to not spare any 'corner' of their mind from purging of sin and dark thoughts, and practically it gave mothers an eternal and spiritual reason for making their kids thoroughly clean the whole house.

In general yes, we overthink things too much. Sometimes it gives us interesting ideas though. At any rate our Icons are on a flat wall, not a corner, and I hardly ever see them in corners in real life, but I've seen many photos online of actual corners.
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« Reply #19 on: July 30, 2013, 06:25:16 PM »

Some people (like myself) include decorative statuary.

I just vomited in my mouth.  Tongue

Hey, now, I like my statues.

I have some too. Three tiny angel figurines carved out of semiprecious stones, barely over an inch tall. Michael is aventurine, Gabriel is smoky quartz, and Raphael is banded agate. They are my son's favourite bit of the setup.  Wink
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« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2013, 09:04:51 PM »

Heretics.  Unmitigated, shameless heretics.  Tongue
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« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2013, 09:10:31 PM »

From the KJV of Ps. 119...

"O that my ways were directed to keep thy statues!"

"I will keep thy statues: O forsake me not utterly"

"I will delight myself in thy statues"

"Hold thou me up, and I shall be safe: and I will have respect unto thy statues continually"

"I cried with my whole heart; hear me, O Lord: I will keep thy statues"

"Salvation is far from the wicked: for they seek not thy statues"
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« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2013, 09:13:54 PM »

From the KJV of Ps. 119...

"O that my ways were directed to keep thy statues!"

"I will keep thy statues: O forsake me not utterly"

"I will delight myself in thy statues"

"Hold thou me up, and I shall be safe: and I will have respect unto thy statues continually"

"I cried with my whole heart; hear me, O Lord: I will keep thy statues"

"Salvation is far from the wicked: for they seek not thy statues"

*hands you some t's*
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« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2013, 09:14:28 PM »

You know, I've read sloppily edited liturgical books with that and other typos.  And the reader does NOT always understand...grrrr.
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« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2013, 09:22:36 PM »

*hands you some t's*

That's very nice of you to offer Smiley However, in Orthodoxy there is a difference between "big T" and "little t" stuff, and since this is little t stuff it isn't necessarily to have them.   police
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« Reply #25 on: July 31, 2013, 09:08:25 AM »

Why?
What?
Where?

I've found this website on (Orthodox) prayer very helpful, it includes links to writings by St. Theophan the Recluse and other Orthodox saints on the topic of prayer  http://www.orthodoxprayer.org/Place%20for%20Prayer.html

Our family is not 'officially' Orthodox yet, however, the priest has come to bless our home and the first thing he did was bless our icon corner and the items there.

Edited to add: the website's main page  http://www.orthodoxprayer.org/PRAYER.html
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« Reply #26 on: July 31, 2013, 11:15:31 AM »

*hands you some t's*

That's very nice of you to offer Smiley However, in Orthodoxy there is a difference between "big T" and "little t" stuff, and since this is little t stuff it isn't necessarily to have them.   police

 Cheesy
Clever answer!  I approve.
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« Reply #27 on: July 31, 2013, 11:21:58 AM »

You know, I've read sloppily edited liturgical books with that and other typos.  And the reader does NOT always understand...grrrr.

I always get a chuckle whenever I read about the "angles"[sic] of heaven.
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« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2013, 01:29:56 PM »

You know, I've read sloppily edited liturgical books with that and other typos.  And the reader does NOT always understand...grrrr.

I always get a chuckle whenever I read about the "angles"[sic] of heaven.


Clearly they are all Right angles
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« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2013, 01:31:32 PM »

You know, I've read sloppily edited liturgical books with that and other typos.  And the reader does NOT always understand...grrrr.

I always get a chuckle whenever I read about the "angles"[sic] of heaven.


Clearly they are all Right angles
They certainly aren't obtuse.  When they show up, it is always quite clear.
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« Reply #30 on: July 31, 2013, 01:57:44 PM »

You know, I've read sloppily edited liturgical books with that and other typos.  And the reader does NOT always understand...grrrr.

I always get a chuckle whenever I read about the "angles"[sic] of heaven.


Clearly they are all Right angles
They certainly aren't obtuse.  When they show up, it is always quite clear.

Unless they've gone rouge. Can't tell at first glance... Grin
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« Reply #31 on: July 31, 2013, 11:04:59 PM »

Some people (like myself) include decorative statuary.

I just vomited in my mouth.  Tongue

Hey, now, I like my statues.

I have some too. Three tiny angel figurines carved out of semiprecious stones, barely over an inch tall. Michael is aventurine, Gabriel is smoky quartz, and Raphael is banded agate. They are my son's favourite bit of the setup.  Wink

Made out of more interesting material than mine are. I have a plastic tan-colored St. Joseph (looks better than it sounds), and two ceramic statues (one gold-painted and the other white) of Mary.
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« Reply #32 on: August 01, 2013, 12:58:43 AM »


Father Seraphim Rose of blessed memory's Icon corner. Picture taken in his hand made cell.


Why a corner, or is that just a clever term?
I'm very surprised no one gave a proper answer for this question. It is often located in a corner to eliminate worldly distractions and allow prayer to be more concentrated. If it's in a corner (preferably an east corner) it takes away your sense of direction and and helps you focus. You can think the Church Fathers and there wisdom for this.

Quote
What is traditionally present? There are a ton of variations in pictures.
Icons of Christ, the Theotokos, and the Patron Saint. An oil lamp normally hangs in front of the icons. The careful trimming of the lamp to keep it burning at all times is interpreted as symbolic of the attentive daily care faithful Christians should take over their souls. Relics of saints (if the family possesses any) and a Gospel Book and a blessing cross would be kept there, as well as incense, holy water, palms and pussywillow from Palm Sunday, candles from Pascha (Easter), and other sacred items, as well as a personal Commemoration Book (containing the names of family and loved ones, both living and departed, to be remembered in prayer).

Quote
What is their primary purpose?
The Book of Acts and the Epistles of the Apostle Paul record that in the early Church, Christians used to meet in the homes of the faithful. (Acts 2:46, Acts 20:7-12, I_Corinthians 16:19, etc.) This tradition of the "House Church" continues to this day in Eastern Christianity. The home is considered to be a microcosm of the Church. The parents (both the husband and the wife) are the "clergy" of the house church, and the children are the "laity." The wedding ceremony ("crowning") is analogous to Ordination, and the house is blessed with a rite that is based upon the Consecration of a Church. Once a year, the priest will come to bless the house with Theophany Water.

An Orthodox Christian is expected to pray constantly. According to Bishop Kallistos Ware, "In Orthodox spirituality, there is no separation between liturgy and private devotion." Thus the house, just like the Temple (church building), is considered to be a consecrated place, and the center of worship in the house is the icon corner.

Quote
Is it something that should be vetted and blessed by your priest?
Again as stated above, "Once a year, the priest will come to bless the house with Theophany Water." If you can't wait that long, take your icons to church and have them blessed. Some people also have their incense blessed because we cense our homes, the demons don't like it and flee from the smoke. (Remember, one you bless an icon it belongs to the Church and is property of God. You don't not through them away. If you have old icons, give them to the priest and they will be burned with a prayer said.)

Quote
Is there an area of the home that is preferred?
Ideally, the icon corner is located so that it is visible when one first enters the house from the main entrance. Traditionally, when first entering the house, an Orthodox Christian would venerate the icons before greeting the members of the house.

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Is N,S,E,W an issue?
An icon corner is normally oriented to face east. That's because the bible mentions when Christ comes again during his second glorious coming, He will be seen in the East. So we pray facing east to always be mindful of the second coming. If you notice, most (if not all) Orthodox Churches face east.

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Are the icon choices personal or is there a specific order?
They are mostly personal choices.  I picked icons of parables that I relate to and I have Saints that I wish to pray for me or whom I relate to because of how they lived (better then I of course) and ask for there strength and help to get over a certain temptation or sin. I'm looking to a monastic path in life so I have a lot of monastic saints. There are lots of different icons of Christ and the Theotokos that have different meaning and some are copies of miracle working icons. Just pick the icons that have special meaning to you.

Normally you won't have icons of Elders who are alive or who haven't been recognized as saints yet. Ask your priest about this.



en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icon_corner
« Last Edit: August 01, 2013, 01:04:38 AM by Peacemaker » Logged

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« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2013, 05:45:12 PM »


Father Seraphim Rose of blessed memory's Icon corner. Picture taken in his hand made cell.


Why a corner, or is that just a clever term?
I'm very surprised no one gave a proper answer for this question. It is often located in a corner to eliminate worldly distractions and allow prayer to be more concentrated. If it's in a corner (preferably an east corner) it takes away your sense of direction and and helps you focus. You can think the Church Fathers and there wisdom for this.

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What is traditionally present? There are a ton of variations in pictures.
Icons of Christ, the Theotokos, and the Patron Saint. An oil lamp normally hangs in front of the icons. The careful trimming of the lamp to keep it burning at all times is interpreted as symbolic of the attentive daily care faithful Christians should take over their souls. Relics of saints (if the family possesses any) and a Gospel Book and a blessing cross would be kept there, as well as incense, holy water, palms and pussywillow from Palm Sunday, candles from Pascha (Easter), and other sacred items, as well as a personal Commemoration Book (containing the names of family and loved ones, both living and departed, to be remembered in prayer).

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What is their primary purpose?
The Book of Acts and the Epistles of the Apostle Paul record that in the early Church, Christians used to meet in the homes of the faithful. (Acts 2:46, Acts 20:7-12, I_Corinthians 16:19, etc.) This tradition of the "House Church" continues to this day in Eastern Christianity. The home is considered to be a microcosm of the Church. The parents (both the husband and the wife) are the "clergy" of the house church, and the children are the "laity." The wedding ceremony ("crowning") is analogous to Ordination, and the house is blessed with a rite that is based upon the Consecration of a Church. Once a year, the priest will come to bless the house with Theophany Water.

An Orthodox Christian is expected to pray constantly. According to Bishop Kallistos Ware, "In Orthodox spirituality, there is no separation between liturgy and private devotion." Thus the house, just like the Temple (church building), is considered to be a consecrated place, and the center of worship in the house is the icon corner.

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Is it something that should be vetted and blessed by your priest?
Again as stated above, "Once a year, the priest will come to bless the house with Theophany Water." If you can't wait that long, take your icons to church and have them blessed. Some people also have their incense blessed because we cense our homes, the demons don't like it and flee from the smoke. (Remember, one you bless an icon it belongs to the Church and is property of God. You don't not through them away. If you have old icons, give them to the priest and they will be burned with a prayer said.)

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Is there an area of the home that is preferred?
Ideally, the icon corner is located so that it is visible when one first enters the house from the main entrance. Traditionally, when first entering the house, an Orthodox Christian would venerate the icons before greeting the members of the house.

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Is N,S,E,W an issue?
An icon corner is normally oriented to face east. That's because the bible mentions when Christ comes again during his second glorious coming, He will be seen in the East. So we pray facing east to always be mindful of the second coming. If you notice, most (if not all) Orthodox Churches face east.

Quote
Are the icon choices personal or is there a specific order?
They are mostly personal choices.  I picked icons of parables that I relate to and I have Saints that I wish to pray for me or whom I relate to because of how they lived (better then I of course) and ask for there strength and help to get over a certain temptation or sin. I'm looking to a monastic path in life so I have a lot of monastic saints. There are lots of different icons of Christ and the Theotokos that have different meaning and some are copies of miracle working icons. Just pick the icons that have special meaning to you.

Normally you won't have icons of Elders who are alive or who haven't been recognized as saints yet. Ask your priest about this.

ize=6pt]en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icon_corner[/size]


Thank you for taking the time to write this. It's very helpful.
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« Reply #34 on: September 17, 2013, 03:03:39 PM »

Didn't know where to put this, but since it pertains to the actual corners on an icon, here goes:

I have an icon of St. George and in the upper left corner of the icon is Christ, blessing St. George.  I searched for some more examples and it doesn't seem very common.  See below for one with Rublev's Trinity in the corner and another with just a blessing hand.  When did this motif, if you will, begin in iconography and why isn't it more prevalent?


NOTE: these are not my icons, just ones I pulled off the Internet.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2013, 03:04:28 PM by hecma925 » Logged

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« Reply #35 on: September 17, 2013, 06:59:25 PM »

Didn't know where to put this, but since it pertains to the actual corners on an icon, here goes:

I have an icon of St. George and in the upper left corner of the icon is Christ, blessing St. George.  I searched for some more examples and it doesn't seem very common.  See below for one with Rublev's Trinity in the corner and another with just a blessing hand.  When did this motif, if you will, begin in iconography and why isn't it more prevalent?


NOTE: these are not my icons, just ones I pulled off the Internet.

Such motifs of divine blessing are very common in iconography, and have been used for many centuries.
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« Reply #36 on: September 17, 2013, 07:09:26 PM »

Didn't know where to put this, but since it pertains to the actual corners on an icon, here goes:

I have an icon of St. George and in the upper left corner of the icon is Christ, blessing St. George.  I searched for some more examples and it doesn't seem very common.  See below for one with Rublev's Trinity in the corner and another with just a blessing hand.  When did this motif, if you will, begin in iconography and why isn't it more prevalent?


NOTE: these are not my icons, just ones I pulled off the Internet.

Such motifs of divine blessing are very common in iconography, and have been used for many centuries.

Thank you.  The more I searched, the more examples I saw.  Although, the one with the Trinity is unique.  I can't seem to find a similar one.
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« Reply #37 on: September 17, 2013, 07:43:31 PM »

Didn't know where to put this, but since it pertains to the actual corners on an icon, here goes:

I have an icon of St. George and in the upper left corner of the icon is Christ, blessing St. George.  I searched for some more examples and it doesn't seem very common.  See below for one with Rublev's Trinity in the corner and another with just a blessing hand.  When did this motif, if you will, begin in iconography and why isn't it more prevalent?


NOTE: these are not my icons, just ones I pulled off the Internet.

Such motifs of divine blessing are very common in iconography, and have been used for many centuries.

Thank you.  The more I searched, the more examples I saw.  Although, the one with the Trinity is unique.  I can't seem to find a similar one.

Though it might not be as commonly used as the motif of Christ or His hand blessing, the motif of the Trinity is by no means unique. I'm sure I could unearth many icons which feature it.  Smiley

One form of "divine approval" which is unique to a specific saint is that for St Nicholas of Myra. In a great many icons of his, Christ is seen on the left, blessing St Nicholas, and the Mother of God to the right, holding the saint's omophorion (bishop's stole) draped across her outstretched arms. This refers to the incident where St Nicholas was stripped of his episcopal rank, ejected from the First Ecumenical Council and imprisoned, following his assault on Arius in his disgust for the latter's heretical pronouncements. Some of the bishops at the council later saw the same vision, of the Christ and the Mother of God returning to him his Gospel and omophorion. This vision was seen by these Fathers as divine approval of Nicholas' righteous indignation in the face of heresy, and restored Nicholas' episcopal rank.





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