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Author Topic: Western Rite Orthodoxy as a Canonical Problem (Lessons from ROCOR WR)  (Read 3842 times) Average Rating: 0
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Christopher McAvoy
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« on: July 15, 2013, 11:56:41 PM »

In this time of difficulty for many of the ROCOR WR, I offer this excellent article as consolation for some of our sadness, which in time God will heal. I myself only became aware of the what occured last Friday (July 12) a few hours ago.

http://academia.edu/490581/Western_Rite_Orthodoxy_as_a_Canonical_Problem

This article sums up many of my own thoughts on the matters that transpired within ROCOR and on the future of the Western rite in the Orthodox Church in general.  I am quite obviously a bit certain what my future holds but I know that my interest and the interest of my close associate and good friend Mr. Symeon Jekel and many other large families in the western rite of ROCOR was not in vain. Families that had equal respect and appreciation for the byzantine rite, many even having attended it for years, but saw something intimately familiar in the heritage of their particular Orthodox tradition from the West.

Perhaps the secret of the Antiochian Churches success with the Latin (western) rite has been because the Patriarch of Antioch more closely oversaw and directly approved of it from the very beginning, since around 1958. This ought to be a lesson for us, as I have no doubt that if the Patriarch of Moscow desired he might achieve similar success in evangelization through it.

Within the Antiochian Western Rite Vicariate, which has been the most stable and consistent in their approval and endorsement of Our rite many people have found a trust and and hope that the full catholicity of the Orthodox Church may be realized. Not simply as an ecumenical concession, but as the genuine manifestation which Christ intended his Church to be. Not confined to a single expression amongst a single people but bringing Christ to all cultures as it always was in the first millenium and the beginning of it's second. It was through the Latin Church in the 9th century that iconoclasm and the Triumph of Orthodox teaching was brought to the entire Church. That churches venerable heritage will continue to survive and live.

It may not be popular or make sense to the majority of Orthodox catholic Christians today, but I am certain that the Latin rite and it's peoples and heritage will live on in unity with the Byzantine rite again someday in the future.

Only God knows when that day will be.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2013, 12:22:22 AM by Christopher McAvoy » Logged

"and for all who are Orthodox, and who hold the Catholic and Apostolic Faith, remember, O Lord, thy servants" - yet the post-conciliar RC hierarchy is tolerant of everyone and everything... except Catholic Tradition, for modernists are as salt with no taste, to be “thrown out and trampled under foot
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« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2013, 01:52:06 AM »

quotes from the article:

"One of the more serious though less frequently mentioned problems presented by Western-rite Orthodoxy is that the
Western rite itself is ultimately a canonical problem. It is not a problem of canonical jurisdiction. Rather, the problem is the
lack of standing of the Western rite in Orthodox canon law.
In the establishment of a Western rite, the applicability of various
points of canonical legislation was never actually answered to any significant degree and indeed there is ample reason to
think that these questions were never really asked in the first place. At best it seems these canonical questions were considered
only superficially. Where they have been considered at all, most attention has been directed towards the text of the rites and not towards addressing the canonical issues per se. This canonical problem arises because the entire enterprise has been entered into without a thorough understanding of the concept of rite as more than just a liturgy.
  (I've said this for years)

(NOTE: In terms of canonical jurisdiction, the question becomes problematic. Some Westem-rite groups, like the Antiochians, would be considered canonical by most Orthodox groups because of their communion with the patriarch of Antioch. The same is the case for the Westem-rite bodies belonging to the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, which is, as of 2007, now in full communion with the patriarch of Moscow and the entire Russian Orthodox Church.)

Such an approach is unsatisfactory because a rite "must be seen as a Church's theological-liturgical-cultural reality. It is not some theological- liturgical-cultural 'suit of clothes' worn by the one Church in order to create an impression of variety and diversity."3 A rite is therefore the totality of the life of that church within a given theological-liturgical-cultural framework. A rite is more than a eucharistic liturgy: it includes the disciplines surrounding that liturgy, the forms of celebration of the other sacraments, devotional practices, monastic activity, and the theological reflection that grows from the worshiping community, to name a few points. In summation, a rite is the totality of the local church being the Church.

The Western rite does meet some of the criteria for "rite" in the definition above, but the only place where the Western rite seems fully formed is in the area of liturgy, and even then there are disputes about what constitutes the authoritative text
for celebrating the Eucharist. The formation of other aspects of the rite has been very uneven, particularly within the
AWRV. For example, while medievalisms are permitted in the celebration of the rite, especially in the area of devotional practices, monastic orders are theoretically only allowed to exist according to the Rule of Saint Benedict since it antedates the so-called Great schism.' While Metropolitan Anthony's Edict on the Western Rite directly states that "Western rite parishes and clergy are subject to the canons of the Orthodox Church "and while this seems acceptable initially, there are serious problems that arise from such an edict because the canon law of the Orthodox Church envisions only one rite, the Byzantine, making strict adherence to this portion of the edict impossible without modification to the Western rite in ways that are not normally envisioned and that would not conform to the substantive definition of rite.

II. The Canons of Trullo and the Western Rite

If one is not careful, one of Alexander Schmemann's more subtle critiques of the Western rite might go unnoticed. In a response to Andrew Sopko, who laments what he sees as evidence of creeping Byzantinization, Schmemann comments that "[Sopko] deplores, not without some irony, the abandonment by St. Stephen's parish of the daily celebration of the Eucharist during Great Lent, celebration forbidden as everyone knows, not only in the Eastern Rite, but by an Ecumenical Council as Here, Schmemann is referring to the Penthekte Council, better known in the West as the Quinisext Council or the Synod in Trullo. This council was convoked by Justinian II in 691/692 ostensibly to complete the work of Constantinople II (553) and III (681) since these councils did not have any associated disciplinary canons. The council was composed of 21 5 bishops, many of whom had been present at the previous council in 681, but there were no Western bishops invited. Basil of Gortyna claimed to represent the papacy as a legate as he had during Constantinople 111, but it is far from certain whether or not he was so authorized or merely acting on the authority he possessed a decade earlier.'

Though the fathers of the council considered it to be ecumenical, as is evidenced by the very first canon, the West frequently treated the council with open hostility. Bede describes the council as a "reprobate synod and Paul the Deacon dismisses it with the epitaph of erratic.12 Pope Sergius resolutely rejected the council, stating that he would rather die than "consent to erroneous novelties."' While we do not know which canons Sergius was opposed to, Canon 82 aroused particular fury in the Syrian-born pope as he added the chant Agnus Dei to the liturgy and ordered that the mosaic Worship of the Lamb be restored in Saint Peter's Basilica.

If Sergius proved to be a man of intractable loyalties to the Roman form of Christianity, Justinian was equally fiery in his temperament, as contemporary accounts suggest, and was not to have his imperial will thwarted easily. Like his predecessor Constans II had in dealing with Pope Martin, Justinian dispatched the protospatharios in Ravenna to arrest the pope.'5 Unfortunately for Justinian, he would have less success than his grandfather as the citizenry of Ravenna and Rome defended Sergius to the point that Justinian's envoy was left to cower under the pope's bed while Sergius tried to disperse the mob.16 Shortly afterwards, Justinian was exiled, Sergius died in 701, and the matter was moot until Justinian's return to power in 705. At that time, Justinian was more amenable to compromise and requested Pope John VI to inform him which canons were deemed offensive by the Roman Church. When that attempt failed due to the pope's death, the same point was posed to his successor, John VII. The latter simply returned the canons of Trullo without comment. l7 The situation was finally resolved in 705 when Pope Constantine personally visited the emperor in Constantinople and agreed that the council would be accepted as ecumenical but the West would simply ignore the canons it deemed reprehensible."

Aside from Rome, there was little support for accepting the council as ecumenical, much less the canons contrary to Western practice. The sole exception was Spain where the bishops made a formal acceptance of the council at the demand of King Wittiza. However, that council (Toledo XVIII, ca. 703) was omitted from later Spanish canonical collections and was definitively repudiated at a later council in Asturias.' Later, during the iconoclastic period, Pope Hadrian acknowledged the council as ecumenical and used Canon 82 to support his opposition to iconoclasm. Finally, John VIII affirmed that the canons of the Sixth Ecumenical Council (including Trullo) were accepted by the Roman Church provided that they "were not contrary to previous canons or decrees of the holy pontiffs of this see or to good moral."' Subsequently, there has been little comment on the validity or ecumenicity of the Trullan canons, except to reject them outright. Certainly, there are reasons to consider the extent that the council was received as ecumenical in the West, but this question is beyond the scope of the present What is significant for our concern is that even if the canons of Trullo were received as ecumenical (and that is not without significant discussion), they were at the very least selectively enforced where the matter came to legislation contrary to established Roman ecclesiastical tradition - if the canons were ever enforced at all. Certainly, the prohibitions of the council do not exert significant influence on Western liturgy, at least in the sense that absolutely no change to Western liturgical practice resulted from attempts to conform to the canons.

The importance of Trullo cannot be overstated for Orthodoxcanon law....
« Last Edit: July 16, 2013, 01:54:23 AM by Christopher McAvoy » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2013, 02:18:04 AM »

The problem is that all the Orthodox (Chalcedonian, that is) accept Trullo.
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« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2013, 02:45:42 AM »

Quote
Canon 82 aroused particular fury in the Syrian-born pope as he added the chant Agnus Dei to the liturgy and ordered that the mosaic Worship of the Lamb be restored in Saint Peter's Basilica.

Heh. Let no RC or WR on this forum now berate me for sticking to my guns on insisting on proper canonicity of icons.  Wink police

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« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2013, 03:58:51 PM »

Quote
A rite is more than a eucharistic liturgy: it includes the disciplines surrounding that liturgy, the forms of celebration of the other sacraments, devotional practices, monastic activity, and the theological reflection that grows from the worshiping community, to name a few points. In summation, a rite is the totality of the local church being the Church.

Indeed, this is why Antioch chose to resume and reintegrate the living Western catholic tradition as the basis for an Orthodox Western Rite, rather than try to piecemeal together all of these interrelated aspects from "pre-Schism" sources to achieve something with no continuity or relation to the actual people coming into Orthodoxy as WR parishes. The established tradition of the West already includes the disciplines surrounding the liturgy, celebrations for the other sacraments, devotional practices intimately tied to liturgical life, etc., that happened organically over centuries and centuries. In other words, they don't need to be made up, or pulled from an arbitrarily selected time and place. I don't think this is irrelevant to the stability of Antioch's Western Rite.
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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2013, 06:02:31 PM »

Yes, sleeper, I'm inclined to agree with you, but Antioch does not allow the historic authentic western rite practice of multiple ordinations per day either. Antioch has not fully done what the article suggests should be done, even if we think it should. People who think the ROCOR WR and Antiochian WR are completely unrelated to each other are mistaken. One does effect the other in the longterm.
Whatever advantages Antiochian WR has over ROCOR WR ought to be shared as much as possible with it in the future.

While I agree things shouldnt be arbitarily pulled from selected times and dates,  I do not think the dates of 1534, 1054 or 1962 are arbitary dates. All three dates initiated major changes, schisms or reformations. All three dates are very meaningful to the patrimony of the latin west. One can point to important influences that all three dates have had in both Antiochian and ROCOR WR's, even if they have sometimes varied with each other how they influenced them. Unity within the Orthodox WRV's is something many of us recognize as very important. Unity of jurisdiction for the entire Orthodox Church "diaspora" of North and South America is equally important.

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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2013, 09:34:07 PM »

I believe we are largely in agreement, Christopher.
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« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2013, 10:50:40 PM »

Quote
A rite is more than a eucharistic liturgy: it includes the disciplines surrounding that liturgy, the forms of celebration of the other sacraments, devotional practices, monastic activity, and the theological reflection that grows from the worshiping community, to name a few points. In summation, a rite is the totality of the local church being the Church.

Indeed, this is why Antioch chose to resume and reintegrate the living Western catholic tradition as the basis for an Orthodox Western Rite, rather than try to piecemeal together all of these interrelated aspects from "pre-Schism" sources to achieve something with no continuity or relation to the actual people coming into Orthodoxy as WR parishes. The established tradition of the West already includes the disciplines surrounding the liturgy, celebrations for the other sacraments, devotional practices intimately tied to liturgical life, etc., that happened organically over centuries and centuries. In other words, they don't need to be made up, or pulled from an arbitrarily selected time and place. I don't think this is irrelevant to the stability of Antioch's Western Rite.
I am coming to have more respect with this viewpoint, Sleeper. Thank you. I just recently purchased a pre-Vatican II Spanish prayerbook, but I guess it's for those in the choir (the title on the front says Liber chori). It's very extensive and quite beautiful. In any event, it looks like it could be easily adapted for Orthodox use with a few corrections here and there. I was pleasantly surprised to see an insert in there describing the eight tone system of Gregorian chant. Are many Western Orthodox churches using Gregorian chant in English?

In Christ,
Andrew
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« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2013, 11:14:51 PM »

Quote
Canon 82 aroused particular fury in the Syrian-born pope as he added the chant Agnus Dei to the liturgy and ordered that the mosaic Worship of the Lamb be restored in Saint Peter's Basilica.

Heh. Let no RC or WR on this forum now berate me for sticking to my guns on insisting on proper canonicity of icons.  Wink police



You and Pope St. Sergius I can discuss that later.
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« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2013, 11:16:45 PM »

Quote
A rite is more than a eucharistic liturgy: it includes the disciplines surrounding that liturgy, the forms of celebration of the other sacraments, devotional practices, monastic activity, and the theological reflection that grows from the worshiping community, to name a few points. In summation, a rite is the totality of the local church being the Church.

Indeed, this is why Antioch chose to resume and reintegrate the living Western catholic tradition as the basis for an Orthodox Western Rite, rather than try to piecemeal together all of these interrelated aspects from "pre-Schism" sources to achieve something with no continuity or relation to the actual people coming into Orthodoxy as WR parishes. The established tradition of the West already includes the disciplines surrounding the liturgy, celebrations for the other sacraments, devotional practices intimately tied to liturgical life, etc., that happened organically over centuries and centuries. In other words, they don't need to be made up, or pulled from an arbitrarily selected time and place. I don't think this is irrelevant to the stability of Antioch's Western Rite.
I am coming to have more respect with this viewpoint, Sleeper. Thank you. I just recently purchased a pre-Vatican II Spanish prayerbook, but I guess it's for those in the choir (the title on the front says Liber chori). It's very extensive and quite beautiful. In any event, it looks like it could be easily adapted for Orthodox use with a few corrections here and there. I was pleasantly surprised to see an insert in there describing the eight tone system of Gregorian chant. Are many Western Orthodox churches using Gregorian chant in English?

In Christ,
Andrew

Sounds awesome! And yes, absolutely. All Antiochian Western Orthodox churches sing Gregorian chant in English, and even in Latin when the occasion permits. One of the most beautiful, instructional, practical volumes designed especially for this is the St. Dunstan's Plainsong Psalter, which restored some of the ancient Gregorian tones unique to the British Isles.


It has everything needed for reciting the Divine Office according to our Tikhonian Use. And if you wanted the full-blown ancient Western monastic office, there is another beautiful volume, called the Monastic Diurnal Noted. This is a complete Gregorian Antiphonal in English, containing all the Antiphons, Hymn Tunes, and Responsories of the "Day Hours" of the Benedictine Divine Office. It's intense though, comes in two volumes.


I'd love to hear your thoughts on your new volume after you spend some time with it.
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« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2013, 12:49:44 AM »

This Hymnal and Graduale contain the propers for both the Liturgy of St. Tikhon of Antiochian WR and Sarum use Mass & Office of ROCOR WR. (Did you know Sleeper that they share the same propers??  Grin) I do not think many people are aware of them as they are very new.

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/Annex/Sarum%20Hymnal%20Part%201.pdf
http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/Annex/Sarum%20Hymnal%20Part%202.pdf
http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/Sarum%20Performing%20Graduale%20beta.pdf

There is a forthcoming Sequentiary for the Graduale which might be ready in 2014. The examples I've been given of completed sequences for it are excellent.

I think a few of the hymns could use tinkering with to improve accuracy (which he did on several hymns)..but they're good enough for now.

Monastic Diurnal Noted is probably the best single adaptation of english plainchant thats ever been made. The melodies resemble the latin ones, yet are modified to conform to english very naturally. It couldnt have been done better a thousand years ago nor has it yet been done so well as that single book, or should I say two books originally. (Lancelote andrewes press put two books together in one volume). It may have been Canon Charles Winfred Douglas lifetime achievement. Most of the descendants of the nuns he created for are now in the RC ordinariate. (Catonsville, MD in the USA , Wantage in England)
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« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2013, 08:06:06 AM »

Yes, sleeper, I'm inclined to agree with you, but Antioch does not allow the historic authentic western rite practice of multiple ordinations per day either.

Please correct me if I'm wrong but I do believe there is a recent instance where three Antiochian Bishops were made in a single liturgy?
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« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2013, 08:09:33 AM »

I've never understood the obsession about pre-schism British liturgics. What's so special about England?
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« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2013, 08:19:33 AM »

I've never understood the obsession about pre-schism British liturgics. What's so special about England?

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« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2013, 08:22:07 AM »

I've never understood the obsession about pre-schism British liturgics. What's so special about England?

It depends on who you ask and why it's important to them. In my opinion, nothing is special about it beyond my own English heritage. Since many parishes of the Antiochian Western Rite were Anglican beforehand, specifically English heritage can be a source of pride and devotion (It was called "The Isle of Saints" afterall Smiley). That and the close ties of North America with England, I would say.

But there are others who romanticize and mythologize about a "pre-Schism" Britain (that never existed) because it gives them a purpose in life. I don't mean that to sound harsh or insulting, but that sort of narrative provides a framework for their "life's work" which is all about "uncovering" liturgy and "picking up where the pre-Schism saints left off" and so forth. Because so much of early English Christian history is shrouded in the mist of time, it allows such people to re-create it according to their own notions. That's my guess anyway...
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« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2013, 08:31:42 AM »

I've never understood the obsession about pre-schism British liturgics. What's so special about England?
Nothing, except for those who speak English.

There is something comparable in French with the Gallican rite.  Which is actually served in Iowa, which, after all, used to be French (I do believe they celebrate it in English, though.  I forgot to ask the priests when I met them). The Milan Synod IIRC used the Ambrosian rite in Italian. It would be nice to see something similar with the Mozarabic rite in Spanish, the Braga rite in Portuguese and the Nidaros rite in Norwegian.
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« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2013, 03:47:51 AM »

Quote
A rite is more than a eucharistic liturgy: it includes the disciplines surrounding that liturgy, the forms of celebration of the other sacraments, devotional practices, monastic activity, and the theological reflection that grows from the worshiping community, to name a few points. In summation, a rite is the totality of the local church being the Church.

Indeed, this is why Antioch chose to resume and reintegrate the living Western catholic tradition as the basis for an Orthodox Western Rite, rather than try to piecemeal together all of these interrelated aspects from "pre-Schism" sources to achieve something with no continuity or relation to the actual people coming into Orthodoxy as WR parishes. The established tradition of the West already includes the disciplines surrounding the liturgy, celebrations for the other sacraments, devotional practices intimately tied to liturgical life, etc., that happened organically over centuries and centuries. In other words, they don't need to be made up, or pulled from an arbitrarily selected time and place. I don't think this is irrelevant to the stability of Antioch's Western Rite.
I am coming to have more respect with this viewpoint, Sleeper. Thank you. I just recently purchased a pre-Vatican II Spanish prayerbook, but I guess it's for those in the choir (the title on the front says Liber chori). It's very extensive and quite beautiful. In any event, it looks like it could be easily adapted for Orthodox use with a few corrections here and there. I was pleasantly surprised to see an insert in there describing the eight tone system of Gregorian chant. Are many Western Orthodox churches using Gregorian chant in English?

In Christ,
Andrew

Sounds awesome! And yes, absolutely. All Antiochian Western Orthodox churches sing Gregorian chant in English, and even in Latin when the occasion permits. One of the most beautiful, instructional, practical volumes designed especially for this is the St. Dunstan's Plainsong Psalter, which restored some of the ancient Gregorian tones unique to the British Isles.

I have this book, and keep hoping to learn to chant from it, but I just can't work it out. I might have not sat down and given it the time it deserves, and really I think that that I should probably just learn more about music first. My wife is pretty musical and might be able to teach me. I love the sound of Western Chant, and would love to be able to do it. I hold onto it for that ever hoped for "someday..."
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« Reply #17 on: July 24, 2013, 08:22:24 AM »

Quote
A rite is more than a eucharistic liturgy: it includes the disciplines surrounding that liturgy, the forms of celebration of the other sacraments, devotional practices, monastic activity, and the theological reflection that grows from the worshiping community, to name a few points. In summation, a rite is the totality of the local church being the Church.

Indeed, this is why Antioch chose to resume and reintegrate the living Western catholic tradition as the basis for an Orthodox Western Rite, rather than try to piecemeal together all of these interrelated aspects from "pre-Schism" sources to achieve something with no continuity or relation to the actual people coming into Orthodoxy as WR parishes. The established tradition of the West already includes the disciplines surrounding the liturgy, celebrations for the other sacraments, devotional practices intimately tied to liturgical life, etc., that happened organically over centuries and centuries. In other words, they don't need to be made up, or pulled from an arbitrarily selected time and place. I don't think this is irrelevant to the stability of Antioch's Western Rite.
I am coming to have more respect with this viewpoint, Sleeper. Thank you. I just recently purchased a pre-Vatican II Spanish prayerbook, but I guess it's for those in the choir (the title on the front says Liber chori). It's very extensive and quite beautiful. In any event, it looks like it could be easily adapted for Orthodox use with a few corrections here and there. I was pleasantly surprised to see an insert in there describing the eight tone system of Gregorian chant. Are many Western Orthodox churches using Gregorian chant in English?

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Andrew

Sounds awesome! And yes, absolutely. All Antiochian Western Orthodox churches sing Gregorian chant in English, and even in Latin when the occasion permits. One of the most beautiful, instructional, practical volumes designed especially for this is the St. Dunstan's Plainsong Psalter, which restored some of the ancient Gregorian tones unique to the British Isles.

I have this book, and keep hoping to learn to chant from it, but I just can't work it out. I might have not sat down and given it the time it deserves, and really I think that that I should probably just learn more about music first. My wife is pretty musical and might be able to teach me. I love the sound of Western Chant, and would love to be able to do it. I hold onto it for that ever hoped for "someday..."

Without knowing what your music education is, one thing that's different about plainchant (which took me a while to get used to) is that the notes aren't fixed to a pitch like they are with classical music. Hearing the tones would no doubt help. This video uses "The English Office" approved for the AWRV, which is virtually identical to that of the SDPP.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2smZifrRZs
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« Reply #18 on: July 25, 2013, 02:43:43 PM »

I've never understood the obsession about pre-schism British liturgics. What's so special about England?

The "Tikhonian" use is decidedly not pre-schism British usage.
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« Reply #19 on: July 25, 2013, 02:45:49 PM »

I've never understood the obsession about pre-schism British liturgics. What's so special about England?
Nothing, except for those who speak English.

There is something comparable in French with the Gallican rite.  Which is actually served in Iowa, which, after all, used to be French (I do believe they celebrate it in English, though.  I forgot to ask the priests when I met them). The Milan Synod IIRC used the Ambrosian rite in Italian. It would be nice to see something similar with the Mozarabic rite in Spanish, the Braga rite in Portuguese and the Nidaros rite in Norwegian.

They did for a short while. It was part of why one of the Bishops retired. In the American Metropolia, the Sarum& Mozarabic liturgies are both permitted, as well as the Ambrosian (provided it is a proper translation into the vernacular, which is not currently used.) Both Braga and Nidaros are sufficiently close to the Sarum that they would be permitted, but since they've never been requested it's a moot point.
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« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2013, 03:00:01 PM »

quotes from the article:

"One of the more serious though less frequently mentioned problems presented by Western-rite Orthodoxy is that the
Western rite itself is ultimately a canonical problem. It is not a problem of canonical jurisdiction. Rather, the problem is the
lack of standing of the Western rite in Orthodox canon law.
In the establishment of a Western rite, the applicability of various
points of canonical legislation was never actually answered to any significant degree and indeed there is ample reason to
think that these questions were never really asked in the first place. At best it seems these canonical questions were considered
only superficially. Where they have been considered at all, most attention has been directed towards the text of the rites and not towards addressing the canonical issues per se. This canonical problem arises because the entire enterprise has been entered into without a thorough understanding of the concept of rite as more than just a liturgy.
  (I've said this for years)

Forgive me, but as someone who's been using actual pre-schism Western Rites for almost a decade having entered Orthodoxy through the East this looks to me like creating a problem where none exists.

Orthodoxy is more fluid than a set a norms, and the simple idea that a "rite" is more than a rite and thus we need to resolve everything that these rites came with at the time of the schism is darn near ecumenistic. A rite is a rite is a rite. It is precisely liturgical. Furthermore, it is adaptable to the needs of the people. These concepts of "western rite" and "eastern rite" are all Roman Catholic in origin; in the earliest centuries of the Church, people knew of different usages, but were sufficiently spiritually familiar with their own "rite" to see the similarity in that of others. It was that similarity which was emphasized, not the difference.

An Orthodox Christian understands the councils as being guided by the Holy Spirit, and this includes Trullo. Over the many centuries there were things every ethnic group did incorrectly, to be corrected by the whole Church. If there are things which do not match the fullness of Orthodoxy according to the dictate of our Father among the Saints Vincent of Lerins, then we should not follow it.

Some may say "well, then, you should just become Eastern." But I am not Eastern. I am Western. And I am Orthodox. And I am quite fine with telling a fellow Westerner he's not Orthodox. If the "Western-ess" of my liturgy bothers you because it seems inorganic unless I am having no further commerce with my wife or using azymes, I respond that the fulness of the Church and the judgment of history have decided against such practices. (In some cases, like both mentioned, both these "sacred local customs" in fact arose and cemented at the time of the schism, less than a century before.)

A True Western Orthodox sees his Patrimony and spiritual nourishment from both the Fathers of the East and the West, just as any good Eastern Orthodox does. It is why all these "Western Rite Experiments" are bound to fail. The Fathers of the West were extremely adaptive when it came to local usages, as the Fathers of the East in different ways. Our failure to recognize that dynamic, preferring instead to see rites not as spiritual things, but collated practices, can separate us from the depth of spiritual nourishment that an Orthodox Christian needs to survive regardless of his "rite".
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« Reply #21 on: July 25, 2013, 03:02:34 PM »

I have this book, and keep hoping to learn to chant from it, but I just can't work it out. I might have not sat down and given it the time it deserves, and really I think that that I should probably just learn more about music first. My wife is pretty musical and might be able to teach me. I love the sound of Western Chant, and would love to be able to do it. I hold onto it for that ever hoped for "someday..."

Without knowing what your music education is, one thing that's different about plainchant (which took me a while to get used to) is that the notes aren't fixed to a pitch like they are with classical music. Hearing the tones would no doubt help. This video uses "The English Office" approved for the AWRV, which is virtually identical to that of the SDPP.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2smZifrRZs

Last night, after she'd gone to bed, my wife heard the chanting from the video as I was trying to match them up and came out to see what I was doing lol. She came into The Church through the Western Rite, and so is familiar with the tones, and as I said knows musical...stuff, so I got a crash course in all the music terms in the "Practical" section of the Psalter. We're well on our way now!
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« Reply #22 on: July 25, 2013, 03:09:18 PM »

I have this book, and keep hoping to learn to chant from it, but I just can't work it out. I might have not sat down and given it the time it deserves, and really I think that that I should probably just learn more about music first. My wife is pretty musical and might be able to teach me. I love the sound of Western Chant, and would love to be able to do it. I hold onto it for that ever hoped for "someday..."

Without knowing what your music education is, one thing that's different about plainchant (which took me a while to get used to) is that the notes aren't fixed to a pitch like they are with classical music. Hearing the tones would no doubt help. This video uses "The English Office" approved for the AWRV, which is virtually identical to that of the SDPP.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2smZifrRZs

Last night, after she'd gone to bed, my wife heard the chanting from the video as I was trying to match them up and came out to see what I was doing lol. She came into The Church through the Western Rite, and so is familiar with the tones, and as I said knows musical...stuff, so I got a crash course in all the music terms in the "Practical" section of the Psalter. We're well on our way now!

Wonderful!
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« Reply #23 on: July 25, 2013, 03:18:36 PM »

Yes, sleeper, I'm inclined to agree with you, but Antioch does not allow the historic authentic western rite practice of multiple ordinations per day either.

What makes it authentic, or a matter of faith? A matter of discipline can be changed.
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« Reply #24 on: July 27, 2013, 09:07:24 PM »

Joseph,

A little bird told me that the four person ROCOR commission appreciates your metropolias liturgy, even if they must lament other aspects of your resistance toward canonical orthodoxy :-) You have a superb historic Roman rite liturgy.  This much I know, if your metropolia, ever makes a single antiphonary published in say a thousand page book (instead of 10,000 pages we have to print out in 30 binders) it would be very welcome and popular in ROCOR. Though the commission also appreciates the Antiochian WR liturgics.
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« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2013, 09:15:38 PM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites? The far eastern rites employed by Christians as far as China? At what point does that make us "Catholic" and why?

I have a thing against defining our Church so as to fulfill our personal interests and wants.
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« Reply #26 on: July 27, 2013, 09:26:34 PM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.
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« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2013, 09:49:12 PM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.
Oh yes, I agree, but I meant it in this case rhetorically within the context of the rest of my post.  Smiley
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« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2013, 10:05:07 PM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Well, I don't know if I'd say that's accurate.  Most EO I know have a positive regard for the rites of the Oriental Churches, but I have heard some, mostly but not exclusively on the internet, suggest that, as EOxy is "the one true Church", that the Holy Spirit willed that there should only be one rite within it, and so the other rites were pruned off the tree by heresy, and so if "they" want to join "us", they have to adopt the "Orthodox rite".  BS, but that's never stopped people before. 

More to Antonis' point, I don't think the Church is any less catholic for want of a Western rite in any dogmatically important sense, but I do believe there is something to be said for it on a more popular level. 
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« Reply #29 on: July 27, 2013, 10:33:40 PM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Well, I don't know if I'd say that's accurate.  Most EO I know have a positive regard for the rites of the Oriental Churches, but I have heard some, mostly but not exclusively on the internet, suggest that, as EOxy is "the one true Church", that the Holy Spirit willed that there should only be one rite within it, and so the other rites were pruned off the tree by heresy, and so if "they" want to join "us", they have to adopt the "Orthodox rite".  BS, but that's never stopped people before. 

More to Antonis' point, I don't think the Church is any less catholic for want of a Western rite in any dogmatically important sense, but I do believe there is something to be said for it on a more popular level. 
Now that I can understand, I just think sometimes we go a little overboard in our pontificating of our personal desires.

I see no real reason to advocate the creation of a Western Rite other than to receive convert parishes. There's no purpose, the Byzantine Liturgy serves just fine as the norm for our Church, and has nourished many generations of saints. It is a living tradition that has developed organically. I think this living tradition is what will breed true saints, not hodge-podge divisive reconstructionism that is, in reality, just as foreign to the West at this point as our Byzantine Liturgy.
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« Reply #30 on: July 27, 2013, 11:23:40 PM »

Yes, sleeper, I'm inclined to agree with you, but Antioch does not allow the historic authentic western rite practice of multiple ordinations per day either.

Please correct me if I'm wrong but I do believe there is a recent instance where three Antiochian Bishops were made in a single liturgy?

Yes. I think that might be the way things are done in the patriarchate. (We have a long tradition of going our own way.)
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« Reply #31 on: July 27, 2013, 11:24:11 PM »

I've never understood the obsession about pre-schism British liturgics. What's so special about England?

It's the Dowry of the Mother of God.
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« Reply #32 on: July 27, 2013, 11:28:13 PM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Sure there is. Those are the ancient rites of the patriarchates of Alexandria and Antioch.

It's not about being more "catholic," it's about getting our stuff back after the divorce.
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« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2013, 12:42:17 AM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Well, I don't know if I'd say that's accurate.  Most EO I know have a positive regard for the rites of the Oriental Churches, but I have heard some, mostly but not exclusively on the internet, suggest that, as EOxy is "the one true Church", that the Holy Spirit willed that there should only be one rite within it, and so the other rites were pruned off the tree by heresy, and so if "they" want to join "us", they have to adopt the "Orthodox rite".  BS, but that's never stopped people before. 

More to Antonis' point, I don't think the Church is any less catholic for want of a Western rite in any dogmatically important sense, but I do believe there is something to be said for it on a more popular level. 
Now that I can understand, I just think sometimes we go a little overboard in our pontificating of our personal desires.

I see no real reason to advocate the creation of a Western Rite other than to receive convert parishes. There's no purpose, the Byzantine Liturgy serves just fine as the norm for our Church, and has nourished many generations of saints. It is a living tradition that has developed organically. I think this living tradition is what will breed true saints, not hodge-podge divisive reconstructionism that is, in reality, just as foreign to the West at this point as our Byzantine Liturgy.
blah, blah, blah.

The same can be said of the rite of Alexandria, the Divine Liturgies of Popes SS. Peter, Athanasius and Cyril.  And yet Constantinople suppressed them.

Not to upset your narrative, but, as I've pointed out here and elsewhere, not all WRO are converts to Orthodoxy.
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« Reply #34 on: July 28, 2013, 01:15:32 AM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Well, I don't know if I'd say that's accurate.  Most EO I know have a positive regard for the rites of the Oriental Churches, but I have heard some, mostly but not exclusively on the internet, suggest that, as EOxy is "the one true Church", that the Holy Spirit willed that there should only be one rite within it, and so the other rites were pruned off the tree by heresy, and so if "they" want to join "us", they have to adopt the "Orthodox rite".  BS, but that's never stopped people before.  

More to Antonis' point, I don't think the Church is any less catholic for want of a Western rite in any dogmatically important sense, but I do believe there is something to be said for it on a more popular level.  
Now that I can understand, I just think sometimes we go a little overboard in our pontificating of our personal desires.

I see no real reason to advocate the creation of a Western Rite other than to receive convert parishes. There's no purpose, the Byzantine Liturgy serves just fine as the norm for our Church, and has nourished many generations of saints. It is a living tradition that has developed organically. I think this living tradition is what will breed true saints, not hodge-podge divisive reconstructionism that is, in reality, just as foreign to the West at this point as our Byzantine Liturgy.
blah, blah, blah.

The same can be said of the rite of Alexandria, the Divine Liturgies of Popes SS. Peter, Athanasius and Cyril.  And yet Constantinople suppressed them.

Not to upset your narrative, but, as I've pointed out here and elsewhere, not all WRO are converts to Orthodoxy.
I'm not really seeing the counter-argument here, only the same rude dismissal that has been repeated again and again. I agree, the same can be said for those liturgies, I feel the same way about them as well, and I never claimed that all WRO are converts.
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« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2013, 08:54:14 AM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Well, I don't know if I'd say that's accurate.  Most EO I know have a positive regard for the rites of the Oriental Churches, but I have heard some, mostly but not exclusively on the internet, suggest that, as EOxy is "the one true Church", that the Holy Spirit willed that there should only be one rite within it, and so the other rites were pruned off the tree by heresy, and so if "they" want to join "us", they have to adopt the "Orthodox rite".  BS, but that's never stopped people before. 

Yeah, there are people out there who say ... well, pretty much anything that can be said.  Cheesy Like those who think that Catholics like me, who don't seek Orthodox-to-Catholic conversions, are thereby anti-Eastern.
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« Reply #36 on: July 28, 2013, 08:55:31 AM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Sure there is. Those are the ancient rites of the patriarchates of Alexandria and Antioch.

It's not about being more "catholic," it's about getting our stuff back after the divorce.

I'll have to remember that one.  Cool
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« Reply #37 on: July 28, 2013, 08:58:27 AM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Well, I don't know if I'd say that's accurate.  Most EO I know have a positive regard for the rites of the Oriental Churches, but I have heard some, mostly but not exclusively on the internet, suggest that, as EOxy is "the one true Church", that the Holy Spirit willed that there should only be one rite within it, and so the other rites were pruned off the tree by heresy, and so if "they" want to join "us", they have to adopt the "Orthodox rite".  BS, but that's never stopped people before.  

More to Antonis' point, I don't think the Church is any less catholic for want of a Western rite in any dogmatically important sense, but I do believe there is something to be said for it on a more popular level.  
Now that I can understand, I just think sometimes we go a little overboard in our pontificating of our personal desires.

I see no real reason to advocate the creation of a Western Rite other than to receive convert parishes. There's no purpose, the Byzantine Liturgy serves just fine as the norm for our Church, and has nourished many generations of saints. It is a living tradition that has developed organically. I think this living tradition is what will breed true saints, not hodge-podge divisive reconstructionism that is, in reality, just as foreign to the West at this point as our Byzantine Liturgy.
blah, blah, blah.

The same can be said of the rite of Alexandria, the Divine Liturgies of Popes SS. Peter, Athanasius and Cyril.  And yet Constantinople suppressed them.

Not to upset your narrative, but, as I've pointed out here and elsewhere, not all WRO are converts to Orthodoxy.
I'm not really seeing the counter-argument here, only the same rude dismissal that has been repeated again and again. I agree, the same can be said for those liturgies, I feel the same way about them as well, and I never claimed that all WRO are converts.

Indeed, one might think, by reading forums such as this, that being rude, dismissive,prideful, boasting  and argumentative (add grumpy while we're at it) were taught as a part of our Catechism!  Smiley
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« Reply #38 on: July 28, 2013, 12:40:03 PM »

All in all, its just a fictional made up "problem" .... not really a problem at all.
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« Reply #39 on: July 28, 2013, 02:02:15 PM »

I see no real reason to advocate the creation of a Western Rite other than to receive convert parishes. There's no purpose, the Byzantine Liturgy serves just fine as the norm for our Church, and has nourished many generations of saints. It is a living tradition that has developed organically. I think this living tradition is what will breed true saints, not hodge-podge divisive reconstructionism that is, in reality, just as foreign to the West at this point as our Byzantine Liturgy.

So the only reason to advocate for the Western Rite is to help converts transition into "manning up" and "being Orthodox", as another poster put it rather elegantly in another thread? 

I find myself more agreeing than disagreeing with those who are against liturgical archaeology and in favour of encouraging living traditions.  I don't see, for example, why Americans in Florida ought to suddenly adopt the Mozarabic rite because Florida was once Spanish, and that was once the principle rite of Spain (and the Mozarabic Rite still lives).  In my opinion, the Roman rite ought to be just fine for everyone, but maybe also some "Anglican" rite for those coming from that tradition.  Even if that seems like a "reconstruction", the communities which use those rites still exist, albeit outside the Church; they can be learned from people, observed in their "natural habitat", so to speak, and not just from a critical edition of a manuscript from some monastery library or something like that. 

But to say that the Byzantine rite serves just fine as a norm for the Church is the statement of those who know and/or prefer nothing else.  No one doubts that it is a living tradition or that it has nourished countless saints.  But it's not the only way that God has willed to sanctify men.  If other ways have "fallen off the vine", it has usually been due to liturgical imperialism, and not simply a loss due to schism.     
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« Reply #40 on: July 28, 2013, 03:35:45 PM »

I see no real reason to advocate the creation of a Western Rite other than to receive convert parishes. There's no purpose, the Byzantine Liturgy serves just fine as the norm for our Church, and has nourished many generations of saints. It is a living tradition that has developed organically. I think this living tradition is what will breed true saints, not hodge-podge divisive reconstructionism that is, in reality, just as foreign to the West at this point as our Byzantine Liturgy.

So the only reason to advocate for the Western Rite is to help converts transition into "manning up" and "being Orthodox", as another poster put it rather elegantly in another thread? 

I find myself more agreeing than disagreeing with those who are against liturgical archaeology and in favour of encouraging living traditions.  I don't see, for example, why Americans in Florida ought to suddenly adopt the Mozarabic rite because Florida was once Spanish, and that was once the principle rite of Spain (and the Mozarabic Rite still lives).  In my opinion, the Roman rite ought to be just fine for everyone, but maybe also some "Anglican" rite for those coming from that tradition.  Even if that seems like a "reconstruction", the communities which use those rites still exist, albeit outside the Church; they can be learned from people, observed in their "natural habitat", so to speak, and not just from a critical edition of a manuscript from some monastery library or something like that. 

But to say that the Byzantine rite serves just fine as a norm for the Church is the statement of those who know and/or prefer nothing else.  No one doubts that it is a living tradition or that it has nourished countless saints.  But it's not the only way that God has willed to sanctify men.  If other ways have "fallen off the vine", it has usually been due to liturgical imperialism, and not simply a loss due to schism.     

Those who think the Byzantine rite is superior to the Oriental rites have probably no experience with Oriental rites.
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« Reply #41 on: July 28, 2013, 03:43:01 PM »

I find the belief that we must revive Western traditions to be fully "Catholic" to be dubious. Is our Church not fully Catholic now because we primarily use Eastern Rites? If so, when do we become "Catholic?" At what number of Western Rite attendees are we "Catholic?" Why limit it to the Western Rite? Why not the ancient Oriental Rites?

The answer I've heard (and I hope someone will enlighten me if this isn't really the reason) is that it's because of the positive regard that EOs have for OOs -- i.e. there's no reason for you guys to adopt "their" rites.

Well, I don't know if I'd say that's accurate.  Most EO I know have a positive regard for the rites of the Oriental Churches, but I have heard some, mostly but not exclusively on the internet, suggest that, as EOxy is "the one true Church", that the Holy Spirit willed that there should only be one rite within it, and so the other rites were pruned off the tree by heresy, and so if "they" want to join "us", they have to adopt the "Orthodox rite".  BS, but that's never stopped people before.  

More to Antonis' point, I don't think the Church is any less catholic for want of a Western rite in any dogmatically important sense, but I do believe there is something to be said for it on a more popular level.  
Now that I can understand, I just think sometimes we go a little overboard in our pontificating of our personal desires.

I see no real reason to advocate the creation of a Western Rite other than to receive convert parishes. There's no purpose, the Byzantine Liturgy serves just fine as the norm for our Church, and has nourished many generations of saints. It is a living tradition that has developed organically. I think this living tradition is what will breed true saints, not hodge-podge divisive reconstructionism that is, in reality, just as foreign to the West at this point as our Byzantine Liturgy.
blah, blah, blah.

The same can be said of the rite of Alexandria, the Divine Liturgies of Popes SS. Peter, Athanasius and Cyril.  And yet Constantinople suppressed them.

Not to upset your narrative, but, as I've pointed out here and elsewhere, not all WRO are converts to Orthodoxy.
I'm not really seeing the counter-argument here, only the same rude dismissal that has been repeated again and again. I agree, the same can be said for those liturgies, I feel the same way about them as well, and I never claimed that all WRO are converts.
I was just pointing out the fact that you demonstrated, with your rude dismissal-repeated again and again-of Divine Liturgies that pre-date the liturgies of the upstart on the Bosphorus, the principle that when someone holds a wrongheaded principle and thereby comes to false conclusions, holding that principle also leads to wrongheaded conclusions elsewhere.

You said that WRO converts should man up and be Orthodox.  Many came to the WRO already Orthodox, manning up.
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« Reply #42 on: July 28, 2013, 03:46:34 PM »

I see no real reason to advocate the creation of a Western Rite other than to receive convert parishes. There's no purpose, the Byzantine Liturgy serves just fine as the norm for our Church, and has nourished many generations of saints. It is a living tradition that has developed organically. I think this living tradition is what will breed true saints, not hodge-podge divisive reconstructionism that is, in reality, just as foreign to the West at this point as our Byzantine Liturgy.

So the only reason to advocate for the Western Rite is to help converts transition into "manning up" and "being Orthodox", as another poster put it rather elegantly in another thread? 

I find myself more agreeing than disagreeing with those who are against liturgical archaeology and in favour of encouraging living traditions.  I don't see, for example, why Americans in Florida ought to suddenly adopt the Mozarabic rite because Florida was once Spanish, and that was once the principle rite of Spain (and the Mozarabic Rite still lives).  In my opinion, the Roman rite ought to be just fine for everyone, but maybe also some "Anglican" rite for those coming from that tradition.  Even if that seems like a "reconstruction", the communities which use those rites still exist, albeit outside the Church; they can be learned from people, observed in their "natural habitat", so to speak, and not just from a critical edition of a manuscript from some monastery library or something like that. 

But to say that the Byzantine rite serves just fine as a norm for the Church is the statement of those who know and/or prefer nothing else.  No one doubts that it is a living tradition or that it has nourished countless saints.  But it's not the only way that God has willed to sanctify men.  If other ways have "fallen off the vine", it has usually been due to liturgical imperialism, and not simply a loss due to schism.     
Indeed, for almost a millenium after Chalcedon, the Chalcedonians and Non-Chalcedonians in Alexandria and Antioch shared the same rite.  Until the never-left-Constantinople "Patriarch of Antioch" Balsamon decided to push his prejudices as piety.
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                           and both come out of your mouth
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« Reply #43 on: July 28, 2013, 04:25:02 PM »

Perhaps it's also worth pointing out that merely adopting the Byzantine Liturgy is not a guarantee of anything, considering the number of Eastern Rite Catholics employing the Eastern heritage yet in full communion with Rome.
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« Reply #44 on: July 28, 2013, 04:26:47 PM »

But the problem is you people make sense. Stop it. You need to man up and become Orthodox.
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