Author Topic: Written Etiquette  (Read 3278 times)

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Offline EofK

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Written Etiquette
« on: May 12, 2010, 01:04:09 PM »
What is the proper protocol for addressing a priest by email?  I remember reading a thread here about signing of with "Kissing your right hand" and various other things, but I don't remember the salutation or anything else, really. 

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. -- Douglas Adams

Online Asteriktos

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2010, 01:05:38 PM »
Was the information perhaps taken from this article?

Quote
When we write to a clergyman (and, by custom, monastics), we should open our letter with the greeting, "Bless, Father." At the end of the letter, it is customary to close with the following line: "Kissing your right hand...."
« Last Edit: May 12, 2010, 01:06:39 PM by Asteriktos »
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Offline EofK

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2010, 01:12:22 PM »
I think it was.  Thank you!
Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. -- Douglas Adams

Offline scamandrius

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2010, 01:41:21 PM »
It is also appropriate to begin letters, prior to asking for a blessing, with the proper seasonal greeting such as "Christ is Risen" or "Christ is Born," etc..  If you desire, instead of saying "kissing your right hand" you may simply write "In Christ" or "ICXC."  It is NEVER appropriate to say to a priest, let alone a hierarch, "God bless you"!
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Offline Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2010, 02:02:04 PM »
It is NEVER appropriate to say to a priest, let alone a hierarch, "God bless you"!

I always found that to be odd. Is not "God bless you" short for "May God bless you"? If that is true, then the prayer is one of intercession as recommended in Epistle of James Chapter 5:  "16Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous man is powerful and effective."

Offline scamandrius

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2010, 02:21:24 PM »
^I'm really not following your train of thought.

Still, blessings are given by those who have been called to do so.  I have not and therefore I will never say "God bless you" or "May God bless you" to a priest or hierarch.  That is established etiquette, which, unfortunately, too many Orthodox, cradle and convert, are ignorant about.
Da quod iubes et iube quod vis.

Offline SolEX01

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2010, 02:22:27 PM »
I prefer to use "Receiving your blessing." when closing a letter written to Clergy or Hierarchy.

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2010, 02:24:54 PM »
Regarding email, I just address the beginning as "Fr. So-and-so", and at the end I just sign with my name. I'm a slacker, I know.
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Offline Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2010, 02:33:15 PM »
^I'm really not following your train of thought.

Still, blessings are given by those who have been called to do so.  I have not and therefore I will never say "God bless you" or "May God bless you" to a priest or hierarch.  That is established etiquette, which, unfortunately, too many Orthodox, cradle and convert, are ignorant about.

I think I am starting to understand. You interpret "God bless you" as a blessing, while I interpret it as a prayer. As a blessing, I would not use the phrase either. This brings us to the question of whether it is ever appropriate to pray for an ordained member of the laos, that is, a deacon, priest or bishop. It is clear from the Divine Liturgy that they look upon themselves as sinners and ask for forgiveness of their brothers and sisters--that is us. Why can't we ask for God's blessing to fall upon them?

Offline EofK

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2010, 04:16:33 PM »
While we're at it, is it appropriate to respond to a priest's or bishop's blessing with "Thank you" or is some other response better?
Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. -- Douglas Adams

Offline chrevbel

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2010, 04:27:05 PM »
I have not and therefore I will never say "God bless you" or "May God bless you" to a priest or hierarch.  That is established etiquette, which, unfortunately, too many Orthodox, cradle and convert, are ignorant about.
It is clear from the Divine Liturgy that they look upon themselves as sinners and ask for forgiveness of their brothers and sisters--that is us. Why can't we ask for God's blessing to fall upon them?
Indeed.  Do we not do this at several points during the litanies?  If not, then why do we say "Lord, have mercy?"

Offline Tzimis

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2010, 04:51:48 PM »
^I'm really not following your train of thought.

Still, blessings are given by those who have been called to do so.  I have not and therefore I will never say "God bless you" or "May God bless you" to a priest or hierarch.  That is established etiquette, which, unfortunately, too many Orthodox, cradle and convert, are ignorant about.

I think I am starting to understand. You interpret "God bless you" as a blessing, while I interpret it as a prayer. As a blessing, I would not use the phrase either. This brings us to the question of whether it is ever appropriate to pray for an ordained member of the laos, that is, a deacon, priest or bishop. It is clear from the Divine Liturgy that they look upon themselves as sinners and ask for forgiveness of their brothers and sisters--that is us. Why can't we ask for God's blessing to fall upon them?

The only person a lay person is allowed to bless is one's own self when doing the sign of the cross. If we start to use terms like "God bless you" to others we diminish the power of the priesthood and put ourselves on equal standing as ordained clergymen.

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2010, 05:42:00 PM »
EDIT..oOo
« Last Edit: May 12, 2010, 05:42:27 PM by Asteriktos »
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Offline PeterTheAleut

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2010, 10:44:45 PM »
^I'm really not following your train of thought.

Still, blessings are given by those who have been called to do so.  I have not and therefore I will never say "God bless you" or "May God bless you" to a priest or hierarch.  That is established etiquette, which, unfortunately, too many Orthodox, cradle and convert, are ignorant about.

I think I am starting to understand. You interpret "God bless you" as a blessing, while I interpret it as a prayer. As a blessing, I would not use the phrase either. This brings us to the question of whether it is ever appropriate to pray for an ordained member of the laos, that is, a deacon, priest or bishop. It is clear from the Divine Liturgy that they look upon themselves as sinners and ask for forgiveness of their brothers and sisters--that is us. Why can't we ask for God's blessing to fall upon them?
Absolutely!  Pray for them.  Just don't pronounce a blessing over them. ;)
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Offline Melodist

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2010, 11:11:06 PM »
It is NEVER appropriate to say to a priest, let alone a hierarch, "God bless you"!

I never say "God bless you" to hierarchs, but I have been told in the past by a priest that he did not consider it to be the same as when a priest blesses someone.
And FWIW, these are our Fathers too, you know.

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Offline genesisone

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Re: Written Etiquette
« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2010, 08:12:56 AM »
When my priest sneezes, I switch to French and say "Santé!"  What do the rest of you do?