OrthodoxChristianity.net
November 29, 2014, 05:09:10 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Timket  (Read 1765 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Aklie Semaet
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 209


Thank God for my fiancée!


« on: January 22, 2005, 06:43:35 PM »

Be'seme Sellasie, Amen!

I would just like to wish everyone a blessed Timket. Timket is the feast of the Epiphany (Baptism) of Jesus by John the Baptist. This is usually a very colorful feast in our Church. In many places in Ethiopia mock baptisms take place in masse (not re-baptisms because you can only get baptized once) with many rare Mezmur sung and special liturgies.

On this Timket we should especially pray for a few things we are reminded of:

1) It is best to see this Feast in Lalibela. I have been there twice during Timket and it is just a Liturgy worth experiencing. In view of the unfortunate reality t.v. incidents of last week as well as the incident a few years ago when the famous Lalibela cross was stolen and then sold back to the government of Ethiopia by a man in France; we should just pray for God to protect the Holy Church from the pressure of commercialism and the quick buck.

Historically speaking the Copts used to have a very colorful Timket celebration as well centuries ago. Historical Arabic (translated for me of course) descriptions describe it taking place on the Banks of the Nile and in Alexandria. You can just imagine the site. Unfortunately as Islam came to dominate Egypt more and more and Muslims persecuted Orthodox the traditional feast could not be maintained and ceased. Nowadays most Copts don't even know about it and it seems like some esoteric Ethiopian custom. Pray for the protection of the Copts from Islamic injustice and for the Coptic medical students still languishing in jail after last months demonstrations protesting against the kidnapping and forced conversions of Coptic women.
Logged

Ethiopia ijochwan wede Egzabiher tezregalech
Antonious Nikolas
Orthodox Christian, Miaphysite, Anagnostis
Warned
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Coptic Orthodox
Posts: 2,449


Saint Nicholas the Wonderworker, Bishop of Myra


WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2005, 12:47:03 PM »

This was an interesting and informative post Aklie.  I hope you had a blessed Timket as well.  Of course, I join you in praying for the Church in Egypt and Ethiopia.

In XC,

Nick
Logged

My sins run out behind me and I do not see them, but today I am coming to judge the errors of another.
SaintShenouti
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 224


« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2005, 12:36:49 PM »

Beloved brothers, I hope you both had a blessed Epiphany.

I should like to know more about this Timket. Alas, we all lament our Egyptian land being overrun by the Arabs, but we join the Lord Christ as we say, "My kingdom is not of this earth." Nationalistic as I am, I always thought how cool it would be to resurrect the old kingdoms and renew Pharaonic rule over Egypt. A revolt against Arab oppression, as it were, and as long as we're talking history, the Copts revolted twice against the Arabs in the mid to late-ninth century. Obvioulsy both attempts failed, but the nationalism we have has never perished.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2005, 12:38:46 PM by SaintShenouti » Logged
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 18,398


"Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee..."


WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2005, 12:43:30 PM »

I should like to know more about this Timket. 

Yeah, any chance of a more detailed description of what the celebration is like?  Smiley
Logged

The Mor has spoken. Let his word endure unto the ages of ages.
paul2004
Paul
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 314

OC.net


« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2005, 05:25:12 PM »


Historically speaking the Copts used to have a very colorful Timket celebration as well centuries ago. Historical Arabic (translated for me of course) descriptions describe it taking place on the Banks of the Nile and in Alexandria. You can just imagine the site. Unfortunately as Islam came to dominate Egypt more and more and Muslims persecuted Orthodox the traditional feast could not be maintained and ceased. Nowadays most Copts don't even know about it and it seems like some esoteric Ethiopian custom. Pray for the protection of the Copts from Islamic injustice and for the Coptic medical students still languishing in jail after last months demonstrations protesting against the kidnapping and forced conversions of Coptic women.


I read in an Indian Orthodox forum that we had this tradition in India. There was ritual bath associated with the feast of Epiphany. I do not know why this tradition did not survive. It may not be due to Hindu influence, because Hindus do have the concept of ritual bath, which they do in rivers of India.

A Greek colleague of mine told me that, in Greece Ephiphany observance includes the priest throwing a Cross in to water and young people diving to get it. I don't know if they have it in Russia and Eastern Europe. It must be almost impossible to dive in to ice cold water.

Selam

-Paul

Logged
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 18,398


"Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee..."


WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2005, 07:41:19 PM »


A Greek colleague of mine told me that,  in Greece Ephiphany observance includes the priest throwing a Cross in to water and young people diving to get it. I don't know if they have it in Russia and Eastern Europe. It must be almost impossible to dive in to ice cold water.

Dear Paul,

I attended old calendar Epiphany services in Queens, and the Greeks threw the Cross in the ice cold river, and thirteen young men jumped in after it.  "For nothing is impossible with God."  Smiley

You mention that we had similar traditions in India, but they did not survive.  Do services for such outdoor blessings of bodies of water exist in our service books, although never used?  Or else was this simply a pious custom of the local people, without any liturgical commemoration other than the blessing of water inside the church?  What is preventing us from "resurrecting" such pious customs which are a part of our heritage? 
Logged

The Mor has spoken. Let his word endure unto the ages of ages.
Aklie Semaet
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 209


Thank God for my fiancée!


« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2005, 10:16:08 PM »

Timket[/b] is a three day feast.

Traditionally it takes place on a lake shore or on the banks of a river. In metropolitan areas like Addis Ababa (the capital of Ethiopia) water is temporarily filled into a huge hole.

A large tent is erected (a Old Testament theme) and all of the Tabot (Arks) from all of the surrounding Churches are taken to this tent, Liturgy is held in this area and the final night the Canticles go on until the next day.

At the end people jump into the water (which the priest blessed previously).

Obviously in American cities it is never three days, there is no tent, only one or two tabots since there are never more than two Churches, and there is no body of water (usually the priest will just splash the holy water on everyone at the end.

You can only imagine what such a feast would have looked like in medieval Egypt on the banks of the Nile before it was suppressed.

I agree with Mor, our Indian brothers should re-start their custom. It is not impossible that the custom could have died out in the turbulent centuries of Portuguese and RC domination or maybe something else? Whatever the reason there is none not to do it now.

the Copts revolted twice against the Arabs in the mid to late-ninth century. Obviously both attempts failed

Well it depends on what you define as a failure. Perhaps it failed to re-establish Pharaonic rule in Egypt Smiley but didn’t it get Muhammad Ali to pull the dhimmi status and the jizya tax that was until applied to Copts?
Logged

Ethiopia ijochwan wede Egzabiher tezregalech
Thomas Daniel (Reji)
Chevalier
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Malankara Archdiocese of Syriac Orthodox Church
Posts: 308


Proud to say belongs to Syriac Orthodox Church


WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2005, 02:28:57 AM »

We (Syriac Orthoodx Tradation) pray in the Epiphany prayer (Ethro - the prayer with incense):
“Come, you Holy Church, and worship the only begotten God who came and redeemed thee by His Baptism and sanctified the baptismal font for you”. Rakkuli Perunnal and Pindi Perunnal are the year old names prevelant among Keralite Christian believers. It is believed that our elders used to take bath in the night in ponds and rivers on the night of the feast of Denaha and hence came the name 'Rakkuli Perunnal. Our people used to send candles and small lamps on top of 'Pindi" (stem of Banana) which floats on water. Our Lord's self introduction that He is the light of the world was remembered when sending floating lights in the ponds and rivers. In a certain areas of Kerala, this tradition is still continued. As the light removes darkness, our deeds and words must be capable to eradicate darkness from this world.
Source: http://www.socdigest.org/articles/medjan05.html

Logged

Oh.. Morth Mariam Yoldath Aloho (Mother Of God)Pray For Us
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 18,398


"Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee..."


WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2005, 12:30:08 PM »

I've heard about these traditions, I just wish we could resurrect them beyond "certain areas of Kerala", as far as possible. 
Logged

The Mor has spoken. Let his word endure unto the ages of ages.
Tags: Epiphany Timkat Ethiopian Orthodox Church Theophany 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.054 seconds with 35 queries.