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Author Topic: Grace before Meals  (Read 1004 times)
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JMJCatholic
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« on: June 05, 2013, 11:36:46 PM »

O Christ God, bless the food and drink of Thy servants, for holy art Thou, always, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.

Can anyone provide the Greek transliteration for the above prayer?

Joanna
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Romaios
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« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2013, 12:05:43 AM »

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Χριστὲ ὁ Θεός, εὐλόγησον τὴν βρῶσιν καὶ τὴν πόσιν τῶν δούλων σου, ὅτι Ἅγιος εἶ, πάντοτε· νῦν καὶ ἀεὶ καὶ εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων. Ἀμήν.

Christe ho Theos, eulogeson ten brosin kai ten posin ton doulon sou, hoti hagios ei, pantote, nyn kai aei kai eis tous aionas ton aionon. Amen.

(Hristé o Theós, evlógison tin vrósin ke tin pósin ton dhúlon su, óti ágios i, pándote, nin ke a-í ke is tus eónas ton eónon. Amín.)

Traditionally, this is reserved for the priest who blesses the food. Lay people just say the Lord's Prayer and/or a Psalm verse (The poor shall eat and be satisfied) for supper.


« Last Edit: June 06, 2013, 12:22:19 AM by Romaios » Logged
JMJCatholic
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« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2013, 12:42:32 PM »

Thank you so much!  Would it be OK to say the traditional "Catholic" grace before meals in Greek?

Bless us O Lord and these thy gifts which we are about to receive from Thy bounty through Christ, Our Lord, Amen?

Joanna
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Romaios
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2013, 01:24:57 PM »

Depends on who you eat & pray with - according to a book on etiquette for Catholic priests I read long ago, grace is to be said in a language everybody/most people present can understand.

The Latin blessing you refer to (Benedic, Domine, nos et haec tua dona, quae de tua largitate sumus sumpturi) is also traditionally reserved for the priest/abbot (at least, so I've seen it done by the Benedictines). I suppose if you eat alone/with no priest present, it's no scandal to use either formula, since you don't intend to usurp any priestly privileges. Moreover, Greek prayer books for laypeople include it, with no mention that it's reserved for priests.

Certain prayers are traditionally reserved for the "Eldest" (gerontika): Psalm 103/104 from Vespers or "Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this night", but if he/she's not present or one prays alone, the next in rank/you yourself can read them.       
« Last Edit: June 06, 2013, 01:35:53 PM by Romaios » Logged
JMJCatholic
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2013, 01:33:00 PM »

Thank you, once again.  I should have made the context clear.  When I am having dinner with a few close Traditional Catholic friends, we say it in Latin.  Since that these mutual friends have an interest in Orthodoxy, it would be nice to learn a prayer before meals in Greek.  I am surprised that the Latin Grace Before Meals was traditionally reserved for the priest or clergy, since it is said in English traditionaly by laity. 

Joanna
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Romaios
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2013, 02:06:59 PM »

Blessings and doxologies are delegated to the clergy (priests or bishops): scrupulous Orthodox people would not even say the "For Thine is the kingdom" after Our Father, but replace it with "By the prayers of our holy fathers, Lord Jesus Christ our God, have mercy on us." That's why even personal prayers begin with "Blessed is our God, now and forever and unto the ages of ages" for priests, whereas laypeople would start and end with "By the prayers".

Grace before meals, like most of our services, originated in a monastic setting. One would always ask the Eldest's blessing to begin any prayer: "Lord bless" or "Master, give the blessing" (Benedicite / Iube, domne, benedicere / Barekh mar/ Rabbotai, nevarekh / Eulogeson, despota). Same with the ending doxologies (ekphoneseis): laypeople replace them with "By the prayers of our holy fathers".

 
« Last Edit: June 06, 2013, 02:31:29 PM by Romaios » Logged
Mor Ephrem
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« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2013, 10:46:28 PM »

Grace before meals, like most of our services, originated in a monastic setting. One would always ask the Eldest's blessing to begin any prayer: "Lord bless" or "Master, give the blessing" (Benedicite / Iube, domne, benedicere / Barekh mar/ Rabbotai, nevarekh / Eulogeson, despota). Same with the ending doxologies (ekphoneseis): laypeople replace them with "By the prayers of our holy fathers".

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