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Author Topic: Fear and Loathing in Chicago (but mostly fear)  (Read 1100 times) Average Rating: 0
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KostaC
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Chicago River Dyeing, March 15th, 20


« on: May 24, 2013, 12:49:10 AM »

Hello, everyone. My name is Constantine. I've had an account here for awhile now, but I never really did anything with it. However, now I think I actually have a need to reach out to my coreligionists online.

I have a complicated religious history. My Mother is Orthodox and my Father is Catholic. Because my Mother had temporarily converted to consumerism at the time and shopped every Sunday morning instead of attending Divine Liturgy, I was baptised Catholic because my Father at the time would actually go to his religion's Divine Liturgy. However, my Grandmother and my babysitter were the ones that practically raised me because both my parents were workaholics (which is why I couldn't speak until I was two-and-a-half because there would be Greek spoken for ten hours a day and then English at night and I just sort of mangled the two together, but that's neither here nor there) and at night my Mother taught me how to make the sign of the cross our own way (which got me some serious looks in the first grade on up at my Catholic grammar school, but again, I'm rambling, my apologies). Well, I'd rather not go into it unless explicitly asked, but my relationship with Latin Rite Catholicism was rough, really rough, it still is in-fact. By 14, the few times I attended Liturgy at my Father's church when pressed I felt a sense of emptiness in the Liturgy (that does not mean that I haven't been frustrated with the culture of Orthodox Christians, I'm not singling out Catholicism out specifically) and in my own life.  By 16 I was finally, officially chrismated into the Orthodox faith and I haven't looked back since then. I thank God that He put me in a situation where I had to fight for my right to become an Orthodox Christian, and I wasn't put in a situation where I could let be a mark made in one of the boxes of the SAT questionnaire, or worse, where I would unequivocally equate my nationality (which I am proud of as well) with my faith. I shudder at the very thought of me being one of those people that thinks only Greeks are the true Orthodox Christians.

But it terms of fighting for my right to be Orthodoxy, it wasn't easy, and three years later it's still not easy. Obviously it's never easy to hear that your child wants to leave the religion you share together, but my Father was supportive (even though he did constantly make "you're leaving Holy Mother-Church" jokes in the car which made my Mother cry on two or three separate occasions). However, his only condition to giving me his blessing in my new life was that I absolutely under no circumstances allow a single soul on his side of the family know that I converted until his own mother passed away at the very least. His side of the family are the eccentric and incredibly zealous Irish Catholics that barely tolerated an Orthodox wife for one of their members or a Lutheran husband for another. I love my Grandmother, I really do, but she represents an ugly side of Catholicism that probably was my first subconscious thrust into searching for the True Faith. My Father maintains that she would never forgive myself nor both of my parents for what she would see as a grave insult and inexcusable error. As such, this has driven my parents to borderline (and I'm only saying "borderline" because I love them) neurosis on hiding my Orthodoxy. They live in fear every single time when religion is mentioned by his side of the family and they do everything in their power to make sure that I stay crypto-Orthodox. Now of course I don't like my Father's crusade to obscure my religious beliefs, nor does my Mother, or my spiritual father, but I abide by it except when explicitly asked. My loving great-aunt who wouldn't care what I was asked me one day during a visit if I was Orthodox. I was told not to lie, and I could not lie in good conscious, so I answered with a proud "yes." My God did I get it in the car from my Father on the way home. He turned a bright red as a tomato and told me in a semi-upset voice, "do you know what you just did? What if she goes up to your Grandmother and says, 'oh I didn't know that your grandson was Greek Orthodox?' in innocence?" My answer time and time again is "What, would she rather have a grandchild that is a practising Christian of a different denomination, or would she rather have another grandchild baptised Catholic who only goes back to church for a funeral or to baptise their old children?" His answer every single time is, "Yes, she would much rather have that last one."

This past Saturday, my great-uncle, the uncle of my Father, passed away. His wake was today, and his funeral is tomorrow. And so my family and I are brought to another hurdle, another hoop to jump through. Communion is offered at Catholic funerals. I don't think I need to explain the problem that when everyone else is in the line for communion and my Mother and I are still sitting holding hands and trying to hide our komboskini's, people are going to notice. Fortunately, since my three years of being an Orthodox Christians I've attended very few Catholic funerals (or funerals of any religious background), and the one I went to last year nobody seemed to notice, not even my Grandmother. But when I'm in a more noticeable spot in the front few pews and my Grandmother is right next to me, this might be the time she asks me, "why aren't you going up for Holy Eucharist with me?" and I tell her the truth.

I understand that there is no magic answer, no one on this forum can wave a magic wand and make my family respectful of everyone's beliefs, but writing this has been rather therapeutic. I'm scared, and I feel lonely because I have no one to talk to about it because my parents just say "We'll cross that bridge when get to it!" and my spiritual father and all the other priests of the area have already settled down for bed hours ago. I just wish that maybe a few of you have some kind words. Not that my family is persecuting me or that they're some sort of evil heretics, but now I'm reminded of John 15:20. I'm also reminded of Matthew 6:34. Why go to bed fretting about what might happen tomorrow when it hasn't happened yet, I suppose. A congregant from an ex-parish of mine once told me, "If the crick don't rise and the dam don't break." Well, the dam hasn't broken yet, brothers and sisters in Christ, I just better say my prayers tonight that it don't break.

I'd also like to apologise for the stream-of-conscious manner in which this post has been written. I wish that I had written out my pleas for strength in a better, more readable manner. 
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«Μὴ μεριμνᾶτε λοιπὸν διὰ τὴν αὔριον, διὀτι ἡ αὐριανὴ ἡμέρα θὰ φροντίσῃ διὰ τὰ δικά της πράγματα. Φθάνει ἡ στεναχώρια τῆς ἡμέρας». Κατά Ματθαίον 6:34

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« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2013, 01:17:34 AM »

Pray to the Theotokos for help in dealing with the situation tomorrow. Maybe you can take leave before communion and say you don't feel well. You can step out until communion is over then return to your seat.

My mother's family are Italian Roman Catholics and my sister and I had to figure out what to do at my aunt's funeral when the Eucharist was offered. My Italian side of the family don't see us as heretics but they don't understand why we wouldn't take communion because they don't see a difference. We didn't want to appear as if we were better than them because we were Orthodox. But we definitely didn't want to have the Roman Catholic gifts shoved in our hands by an overly enthusiastic priest.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2013, 01:25:16 AM by Tamara » Logged
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« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2013, 01:19:45 AM »

Lord have mercy.
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« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2013, 01:48:40 AM »

Lord have mercy !
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« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2013, 05:22:12 AM »

There is a an unfortunate history of the reaction by Irish Catholic clergy towards Eastern Christians in North America. So little surprise that their flock danced to the same auld tune. And this brave poster shows that such ignorance of their own Church structure leads to real casualties.

Lord have mercy.
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« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2013, 06:51:05 AM »

Lord, have mercy!
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« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2013, 07:42:50 AM »

Welcome Kosta!
I'm sorry you have been affected by differences among your family members.  It's clear that you love them all, otherwise you wouldn't worry about their reactions.  Love will cover and heal a lot of differences and wounds.  Maybe not instantly, but certainly over time. 
A funeral is a delicate time, when emotions are high.  I agree you need to be careful to avoid confrontation if possilble.  And if not, I've found saying 'I'm sorry, but I can't right now'  works well for me in sticky situations. 
Keep asking our Lord Jesus and His Mother and your Patron Saint for help - all the time!   
Love, elephant


 
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« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2013, 08:10:57 AM »

Lord have mercy!

You are in my prayers.  I know it is very difficult to have friction in the family over religion.  I struggle with the same issue although perhaps not to the same extent as you.
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« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2013, 08:13:53 AM »

Welcome KostaC!
As you well said, no one can give you the magic answer, because no one knows the situation in your family, neither the characteristics and the behavior of every member of the family when it comes to such issues, except you.
As elephant says, avoid conflicts during the funeral, because at such things, usually people lose control of themselves and things may go out of control. So, avoid conflicts during such events.
When all that is over, you can start, as in our country people say, "touching the pulse" about such issues and with God's guidance, find a definite solution to your situation.
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« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2013, 10:36:17 AM »

Hello Constantine.  

I'd just like to offer my own 2 (inadequate) cents....

As Elephant says, don't forget to pray to the Lord at all times throughout this difficult period:  call on His name whenever you have need.   (I think what Tamara says about the Theotokos is also a great idea.)  It may not seem like it now, but this time will pass and you will grow from it if you continue to struggle to be open to the will of God as you are bravely doing now.

Always remember: you are not alone. The Lord Himself, His Holy mother, and thousands of saints are with you.  And we are here praying for you, too.
Many of us have had to go through difficult trials with family and with "ecumenical agony" at various times.  

I remember part of a sign I saw on an office door that helped me get through a lot of adversity.  I can't remember all of it, but it was something like this:

"Difficult moments: pray to God.  Happy moments: praise God.  (Something else I forget, and then)

If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it."

Be assured that you are in my unworthy prayers.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2013, 10:56:55 AM by Pravoslavbob » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2013, 11:25:34 AM »

You've gotten two great suggestions - say you're not feeling well (not a lie - this is a situation that could give anyone ulcers!) and step out before Communion and return after, feeling better (also not a lie!)
Or just say, "I'm sorry, I can't right now." No explanation, no apology. A funeral is no place to deliver news like this to your grandmother.

Afterward, perhaps you could have a heart-to-heart with your parents (who, forgive me, quite frankly have created this situation!), explain how their subterfuge is affecting you and your relationship with your family, and asking them to come up with a better solution.

That said, you may just have to bear up. I was at my (Catholic) father-in-law's funeral and overheard two elderly ladies behind me discussing the family: "that's David and that's his wife Pat - he's the youngest, the next one is George, he's the middle one, and that's Dennis and his wife - he left the Church."
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« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2013, 11:33:15 AM »

Christ is risen!

Besides the obvious answer to pray.

You only have a problem if your grandmother asks.  If she does, yes, you'll have to say that you are taking communion in the Orthodox Church.

Otherwise, you don't have to say a thing.  Christ didn't say you had to announce your conversion to the authorities to get executed. In fact, the Church forbade that precisely.  Much less in your situation, when really you are remaining mum not for your benefit, for the benefit of others.

Can anyone else sit next to your grandmother, like your father?  The further you are from her, the more likely the issue will not come up.

Lord have mercy!

Do tell us what happened.
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« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2013, 11:36:12 AM »

You've gotten two great suggestions - say you're not feeling well (not a lie - this is a situation that could give anyone ulcers!) and step out before Communion and return after, feeling better (also not a lie!)
Or just say, "I'm sorry, I can't right now." No explanation, no apology. A funeral is no place to deliver news like this to your grandmother.

Afterward, perhaps you could have a heart-to-heart with your parents (who, forgive me, quite frankly have created this situation!), explain how their subterfuge is affecting you and your relationship with your family, and asking them to come up with a better solution.

That said, you may just have to bear up. I was at my (Catholic) father-in-law's funeral and overheard two elderly ladies behind me discussing the family: "that's David and that's his wife Pat - he's the youngest, the next one is George, he's the middle one, and that's Dennis and his wife - he left the Church."
Even better.  If you can manage it, eat something in front of your grandmother right before the funeral (I remember asking a fellow student about that when I went to one of their schools.  Though I think it is only an hour or half hour of fasting).
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« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2013, 07:09:10 PM »

Welcome Kosta, I use the Jesus prayer all the time and it always seems to take away my anxiety over daily issues and especially ones that involve relatives.

Jesus Christ son of God, Lord have mercy.
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Chicago River Dyeing, March 15th, 20


« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2013, 01:34:17 AM »

First, I'd like to thank everyone individually for their help through this time. Everyone in my great-uncle's immediate family was able to be strong during their time of mourning, especially my own Dad who was very close to his uncle, especially after his own father passed away. I did not expect such an outpour of comfort and wisdom. Since I'm so new here, I didn't expect much, so what I've received from you all is such a pleasant surprise that during our drive time between locations today, I couldn't stop reading this thread. You are all extremely kind and remind me why in so many of our prayers, we say "we", because we are one community in Christ.

Truth be told, I had some major oversight. I was too busy worrying about what might have happened, what I would have said, how I would've walked out in a fury if confrontation had started and all these horrible oversights, that I didn't think to do any serious praying. Sure I remembered some Biblical quotes, but I wasn't feeling them or living them. Pretty silly, I know.

A few of you might be wondering how the actual events of the funeral transpired. It started off pretty awkwardly. In the morning as we were getting out of the car, my Mom called me "Kosta." I should explain. I have two names, "Brian" which I was baptised as and which the American State recognises me as, and "Konstantinos"/"Constantine" that I was chrismated as and which incidentally the Greek State recognises me as. They don't know that I have the latter name, so when they hear my Mother refer to me as something else and then begin to speak in Greek, well, then it gets awkward. Fortunately, though, only one of my cousins was nearby, and they personally don't care what I'm named or what religion I am. In fact, my name being "Kosta" on Facebook and my page information listing me as an Orthodox Christian was a huge point of controversy between my parents and I for fear that one of my three paternal cousins would rat me out. I'm blessed that they're a bit more modern than their elders, so they haven't breathed a word of it nor will they.

My apologies, let me continue. The next problem was really my own fault. When I went on a Real Break trip to Constantinople/Istanbul, I was given a given a lapel pin by the personal driver of His All Holiness who was with us the entire week because His All Holiness had booked a surprise vacation to Norway and he had nothing else to worry about. It's a beautiful pin that has the title and name of His All Holiness on it in green, red, and gold. Well, I promised the driver, Mr. Avramahis, that I would wear it every single chance I got, and I'm stubborn enough that I wasn't about to break the promise so soon. I got very few questions about it, and most of the time, "I got it in Turkey" sufficed. One relative did however ask what it meant, but I was able to get around what exactly it said by showing her a picture of all of us (another aside: I told them that my university was offering the trip and it was made up of Orthodox Christians, Uniates, and Latins, and we were for both the Constantinopolitan and Armenian Patriarchs. They didn't question why my friend from highschool who goes to Notre Dame went, and thank God for that!), the Patriarchal Driver included.

Communion itself went better than I could have imagined. My grandmother sat with the utmost immediate family so we were two rows behind her. Not to be crass, but I had a lot of seltzer water in the car-ride over, so as soon as the communion hymns started, I ran to find the restroom. I also had recently misplaced my small, everyday komboskini that isn't noticeable in the palm of my hand, so what I brought with me is my jet-black, woolen, 100-knot komboskini which is not so easily concealable. But, I wasn't about to go out of my way to hide one of the most precious things that I own, and nobody asked me where my rosary went, so I didn't even have a reason to do so. Oh, the only awkward incident during preparation for communion was when the priest asked us all to kneel, I just sort of wanted to sit because we're still in the Feast of the Ascension (and I was not about to stand), but my Mother decided at that moment to lose control of the sound of her voice and when she said, "Kneel, Kosta!" it came a lot louder than she had intended. Either no one noticed or no one cared, because I was in the clear. Oh, also, it's a tradition for the funerals of police officers to have a policeman come in uniform and help with the process. Now this police officer was my Dad's friend and partner, and he knows that I'm Orthodox, and off to the side of the casket near the flowers, he starts asking me about my cross and what my pin meant and my Dad explained to him our situation. His response was "That's okay, I became Protestant. Your mother is going to want to go after me before she goes after him!" It made me laugh and reminded me that my predicament is just so bizarre.

So, that's my story. The service was awkward at times, but with Divine Providence I got through it. I live to fight another day as a quasi-crypto-Orthodox. Everyone's words and prayers made me feel better a hundredfold. I think that I should start posting here more often and maybe get to know you all better. Today I read a story here about a gentleman from Kerry who had even more problems with his conversion than I did, and it was extremely uplifting.

I still maintain, however, that I'm happy that I was baptised Catholic. Having to fight for my religion, it gives me a feeling that I don't really think I can describe. Again, thank you all.

Yours in Christ,
Constantine
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«Μὴ μεριμνᾶτε λοιπὸν διὰ τὴν αὔριον, διὀτι ἡ αὐριανὴ ἡμέρα θὰ φροντίσῃ διὰ τὰ δικά της πράγματα. Φθάνει ἡ στεναχώρια τῆς ἡμέρας». Κατά Ματθαίον 6:34

"Bendito seja o que vem em nome do Senhor, o Senhor é Deus e se manifestou a nós."
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« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2013, 04:11:36 PM »

I have three questions for the OP:

1.  Does your mother believe that Roman Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity are one in the same?
2.  If yes to Question 1, did she develop this view before or after she became involved with your father?
3.  If no to Question 1, why does she act like a Roman Catholic in a Roman Catholic church?
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Chicago River Dyeing, March 15th, 20


« Reply #16 on: May 25, 2013, 05:58:03 PM »

I have three questions for the OP:

1.  Does your mother believe that Roman Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity are one in the same?
2.  If yes to Question 1, did she develop this view before or after she became involved with your father?
3.  If no to Question 1, why does she act like a Roman Catholic in a Roman Catholic church?

1. No, she doesn't.
3. First of all she can't kneel in any church, ours or theirs, but she kneels in ours anyway and then she starts to cry and I have to help her back into the pew. In fact, her knees have gotten do bad that she's getting them replaced in September. She made me kneel because she A.) doesn't want to make a scene, B.) She wants me to very least respect them. I mean, it's not like she made me get a blessing from the priest.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2013, 06:01:15 PM by KostaC » Logged

«Μὴ μεριμνᾶτε λοιπὸν διὰ τὴν αὔριον, διὀτι ἡ αὐριανὴ ἡμέρα θὰ φροντίσῃ διὰ τὰ δικά της πράγματα. Φθάνει ἡ στεναχώρια τῆς ἡμέρας». Κατά Ματθαίον 6:34

"Bendito seja o que vem em nome do Senhor, o Senhor é Deus e se manifestou a nós."
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« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2013, 06:09:37 PM »

I have three questions for the OP:

1.  Does your mother believe that Roman Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity are one in the same?
2.  If yes to Question 1, did she develop this view before or after she became involved with your father?
3.  If no to Question 1, why does she act like a Roman Catholic in a Roman Catholic church?

1. No, she doesn't.
3. First of all she can't kneel in any church, ours or theirs, but she kneels in ours anyway and then she starts to cry and I have to help her back into the pew. In fact, her knees have gotten do bad that she's getting them rein September

Do you feel comfortable kneeling in a Roman Catholic Church especially when ordered by your mother?  There are a handful of occasions when I kneel at my church and most of them occur during Lent, Holy Week, Pentecost and September 14, Elevation of the Holy Cross.  Otherwise, I'm content sitting down (and/or bowing my head in prayer) when others sit or kneel.

I'm not sure how devout the Irish Catholics are on your father's side of the family except I wouldn't allow them to affect your faith.  You are Orthodox, so be it.  You're also the son of an Irish Catholic police officer (is your mom a police officer as well), be proud of that and the two can exist in harmony without unnecessary stress and anguish.
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« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2013, 06:27:30 PM »

I have three questions for the OP:

1.  Does your mother believe that Roman Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity are one in the same?
2.  If yes to Question 1, did she develop this view before or after she became involved with your father?
3.  If no to Question 1, why does she act like a Roman Catholic in a Roman Catholic church?

1. No, she doesn't.
3. First of all she can't kneel in any church, ours or theirs, but she kneels in ours anyway and then she starts to cry and I have to help her back into the pew. In fact, her knees have gotten do bad that she's getting them rein September

Do you feel comfortable kneeling in a Roman Catholic Church especially when ordered by your mother?  There are a handful of occasions when I kneel at my church and most of them occur during Lent, Holy Week, Pentecost and September 14, Elevation of the Holy Cross.  Otherwise, I'm content sitting down (and/or bowing my head in prayer) when others sit or kneel.

I'm not sure how devout the Irish Catholics are on your father's side of the family except I wouldn't allow them to affect your faith.  You are Orthodox, so be it.  You're also the son of an Irish Catholic police officer (is your mom a police officer as well), be proud of that and the two can exist in harmony without unnecessary stress and anguish.

No I didn't, but I did anyway. She told me to do something and I obeyed. What are you expecting me to do, go charging in and break up a family? They're zealous and nationalistic, not devout, that's the problem.

I'm sorry, I don't think you read my story too well. They can't exist together, that's what I've been getting at this entire time.
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«Μὴ μεριμνᾶτε λοιπὸν διὰ τὴν αὔριον, διὀτι ἡ αὐριανὴ ἡμέρα θὰ φροντίσῃ διὰ τὰ δικά της πράγματα. Φθάνει ἡ στεναχώρια τῆς ἡμέρας». Κατά Ματθαίον 6:34

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« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2013, 06:48:28 PM »

I have three questions for the OP:

1.  Does your mother believe that Roman Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity are one in the same?
2.  If yes to Question 1, did she develop this view before or after she became involved with your father?
3.  If no to Question 1, why does she act like a Roman Catholic in a Roman Catholic church?

1. No, she doesn't.
3. First of all she can't kneel in any church, ours or theirs, but she kneels in ours anyway and then she starts to cry and I have to help her back into the pew. In fact, her knees have gotten do bad that she's getting them rein September

Do you feel comfortable kneeling in a Roman Catholic Church especially when ordered by your mother?  There are a handful of occasions when I kneel at my church and most of them occur during Lent, Holy Week, Pentecost and September 14, Elevation of the Holy Cross.  Otherwise, I'm content sitting down (and/or bowing my head in prayer) when others sit or kneel.

I'm not sure how devout the Irish Catholics are on your father's side of the family except I wouldn't allow them to affect your faith.  You are Orthodox, so be it.  You're also the son of an Irish Catholic police officer (is your mom a police officer as well), be proud of that and the two can exist in harmony without unnecessary stress and anguish.

No I didn't, but I did anyway. She told me to do something and I obeyed. What are you expecting me to do, go charging in and break up a family?

If you don't kneel, who is affected more?

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Jovan
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« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2013, 06:57:38 PM »

Please brothers and sisters, give Kosta, our dear brother Constantine a little break from all the questioning and cherry picking.

The grace of God is multidimensional, don´t look at one side of the coin and say. Praise God Kosta became orthodox, and that´s it.

But rather say, Praise be to God and his gracious name that Constantine endures all this because of his love for his family. Gods truth is working in Constantines life and yet he suffers not because of his own name, but because of his love for the family.

I can already say, dear brother Constantine, you´ve fullfilled the 5th commandment more than i have ever done in all.

Please pray and forgive me for any embittering thought I have had against you, humble request from a great sinner.

You stand boldly with the faith and yet don´t wanna turn your family upside down. If your kneeling would be wrong.

How much more wrong are not they(including me) who with no problems and restrictions yet refuse to stand boldly in the faith.

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« Reply #21 on: May 26, 2013, 01:15:39 PM »

No I didn't, but I did anyway. She told me to do something and I obeyed. What are you expecting me to do, go charging in and break up a family? They're zealous and nationalistic, not devout, that's the problem.

I'm sorry, I don't think you read my story too well. They can't exist together, that's what I've been getting at this entire time.

This sort of family situation is not as uncommon as some might think, even in different cultures, and it's hard enough to navigate from within the culture, let alone for others to advise on from without. 

I haven't read this thread too carefully, but it seems like you got some basically good advice.  You may want to consider a "long term plan" for addressing this situation, but for the time being, you seem to have done everything you could possibly do in an uncomfortable situation in a reasonable manner.  God be with you. 

Re: the kneeling, just my opinion--I wouldn't sweat it too much.  On those occasions when I've had to attend Catholic services for some unavoidable circumstance, I've "gone through the motions" when it came to standing, sitting, kneeling, even though I didn't sign myself with the Cross, pray the prayers, etc., just to avoid drawing attention to myself.  No one can reasonably expect you to charge into a church not your own, especially at something as emotionally charged as a funeral, and beat everyone upside the head with the Orthodoxy stick.  That's not evangelism.     
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« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2013, 02:22:46 PM »

Totally agree brother, you scored again Tongue
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« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2013, 06:13:20 PM »

i am sending a personal message, as i understand your situation but don't want to tell people about mine!
i thank God for guiding you, and for the good advice so far here.
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