OrthodoxChristianity.net
October 24, 2014, 09:54:59 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Confession in the Greek Orthodox church  (Read 7640 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
queen
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 30


OC.net


« on: January 16, 2005, 10:02:36 PM »

How often does the G.O. church require us to go to confession? I'm embarrassed to admit that I don't know the answer to this although I have been brought up in the Greek church.

I know in the Catholic church it is suggested once a month. To me, it seems easier to go to confession in a catholic church because it has regular schedules for this. Our greek church does not. You have to make an appointment.

anyway.. does anyone know what is required?

thanks

queen
Logged
Arystarcus
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Posts: 836


« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2005, 11:18:54 PM »

Insofar as I know, the bare minimun for confession in all the Eastern Orthodox Churches is once a year, although it is obviously recommended to go more often - especially if you are comuning frequently. Sadly, I have heard about this situation with confession in the Greek Orthodox Church, just as you described. It would be good for you to have a regular confessor and if this is not offered to you in the G.O. Church, then perhaps you could make your confession at another Orthodox church in your area that provides regular scheduled confession times. I know that the situation in the OCA is confession is usually made available before or after Saturday night Vespers and on Sunday mornings before liturgy, some variances do occur though. You may want to check out some of these other ORthodox churches and see what they have available for you.

In Christ,
Aaron
Logged
Matthew777
Warned
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,497

Seek and ye shall find


WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2005, 11:26:38 PM »

How often does the G.O. church require us to go to confession? I'm embarrassed to admit that I don't know the answer to this although I have been brought up in the Greek church.
queen


Confession in the Malankara Church, at the least, is once during Lent and once during Advent.

I know in the Catholic church it is suggested once a month. queen

More like once a year.

You have to make an appointment.
queen


Last time I had confession, I asked the priest to give me confession after liturgy and he was more than willing. It felt great to have it all of my chest, and I have felt like a new man since then.

« Last Edit: January 16, 2005, 11:30:02 PM by Matthew777 » Logged

He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how. - Friedrich Nietzsche
www.aramaicpeshitta.com
http://www.mechon-mamre.org/e/et/et0.htm
David
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA (Diocese of the South)
Posts: 1,952


Retired GM


WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2005, 11:28:13 PM »

Interesting.  In my diocese(OCA Archdiocese of the South), Abp DMITIRI has decreed that the minimum number of times that one must go to confession is four; one for each major fast.  Monthly confession is encouraged, however. 
Logged

"When looking at faults, use a mirror, not a telescope."
-Yazid Ibrahim
Arystarcus
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Posts: 836


« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2005, 11:41:36 PM »

Quote
In my diocese(OCA Archdiocese of the South), Abp DMITIRI has decreed that the minimum number of times that one must go to confession is four; one for each major fast.  Monthly confession is encouraged, however.

Archbishop Dmitri has given sound advice, to be sure. My priest would also like to see people go once a month, at a minimum, but it will take some time for this to happen. He said that unfortunately, quite a few have that minimum of "once a year" requirement deeply rooted and won't budge from it.

In Christ,
Aaron
Logged
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,487


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2005, 12:48:28 AM »



Confession in the Malankara Church, at the least, is once during Lent and once during Advent.



More like once a year.



Last time I had confession, I asked the priest to give me confession after liturgy and he was more than willing. It felt great to have it all of my chest, and I have felt like a new man since then.



Wrong. It is suggested in the Catholic Church that you go once a month. It is REQUIRED once a year.

Anastasios
« Last Edit: January 17, 2005, 12:56:36 AM by Anastasios » Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodox teaching. Also, I served as an Orthodox priest from 2008-2013, before resigning.
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,441


« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2005, 01:17:47 AM »

Has anyone here read the Steps to Transformation book by Fr. Meletios Webber?  In the book he gives an anecdote about confession traditions from personal experience.  Fr. Mel (commonly referred to for short) is in the GOA and studied under Bishop Kallistos (he says they call him Super K at Ozford).  His story compared how some priest (before he himself was a priest) in Finland that only spoke Swedish and Finnish needed a translator for him and this was awkward, but was more than happy to hear his confession.  Now, visiting the Holy Mountain one time, he asked a Greek priest and the priest seemed angry to be bothered and further, once the confession was heard, admantly admonished him.  He compared the Slavic practice to be regular and a lot of minor general sins (besides major ones), while the Greek practice was less often and only for more serious sins.

Now, I have no idea how accurate, traditionally this is as it is just a personal anecdote from him, but something possibly to think about - whether or not that actually was Fr. Mel's belief himself or just a 'shocking' anecdote to him personally.
Logged
Tallitot
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jewish
Jurisdiction: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism
Posts: 2,637



WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2005, 01:22:47 AM »

When I was in catechumenate once every 4-6 weeks was suggested. After your priest gets to know you, he may suggest a good interval based on your own situation, where you are spiritually.
Logged

Proverbs 22:7
Matthew777
Warned
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,497

Seek and ye shall find


WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2005, 01:53:22 AM »



Wrong. It is suggested in the Catholic Church that you go once a month.
Anastasios

But how many Catholics actually do that?
« Last Edit: January 17, 2005, 01:54:25 AM by Matthew777 » Logged

He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how. - Friedrich Nietzsche
www.aramaicpeshitta.com
http://www.mechon-mamre.org/e/et/et0.htm
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,487


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2005, 01:58:37 AM »



But how many Catholics actually do that?

First of all, you asked what was suggested. Every modern spiritual director I have seen write down a suggestion said once a month at least.

Second, I would wager many. Every time I went to RC confession it was packed, and I often saw the "repeat offenders" (:Wink there too.

Anastasios
« Last Edit: January 17, 2005, 01:59:28 AM by Anastasios » Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodox teaching. Also, I served as an Orthodox priest from 2008-2013, before resigning.
Matthew777
Warned
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,497

Seek and ye shall find


WWW
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2005, 02:40:17 AM »

I try to go at least twice a year. However, my last confession was in November, over a year since the one before.
Logged

He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how. - Friedrich Nietzsche
www.aramaicpeshitta.com
http://www.mechon-mamre.org/e/et/et0.htm
Arystarcus
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Posts: 836


« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2005, 04:06:24 AM »

I go to confession quite frequently myself, because I've long desired to be able to receive spiritual direction as this was more a "private thing" in my protestant background, where one decides for themself what are truly sins and whether or not they need to confess them to God. To bare my sins openly before God and his priest is so meaningful to me that I can't imagine my life without it now.

In Christ,
Aaron
Logged
Arystarcus
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Posts: 836


« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2005, 04:11:29 AM »

Quote
Second, I would wager many. Every time I went to RC confession it was packed, and I often saw the "repeat offenders" (: there too.

In my experiences, the only times I saw this was at churches that offered the Tridentine Mass and only at one Novus Ordo Church, whose last Mass on Sunday was at 8:00pm and there would be confessions held after Mass, where the line would extend well beyond the doors leading into the church.

What I have often wondered about is why the confessions were taken after Mass, after one had already received the Eucharist. I thought the point was to confess your sins before receiving, so as to receive the Eucharist with a pure heart, freed from sin.

Wouldn't confessing after Mass make receiving the Eucharist before making that confession a sin? Can anyone shed some light on this for me?

In Christ,
Aaron
Logged
prodromos
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 1,463

Sydney, Australia


« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2005, 04:30:57 AM »


Now, visiting the Holy Mountain one time, he asked a Greek priest and the priest seemed angry to be bothered and further, once the confession was heard, admantly admonished him.


I can understand the priest's response. It is important to have a solid relationship with your confessor so that you are actually accountable to someone who can discern over time what your weak areas are. People who want to confess to a stranger ISTM are not willing to deal properly with their sin.

John.
Logged
Irish Melkite
Information Mongeror
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Melkite Greek-Catholic
Jurisdiction: Eparchy of Newton
Posts: 988


WWW
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2005, 10:21:48 AM »

What I have often wondered about is why the confessions were taken after Mass, after one had already received the Eucharist. I thought the point was to confess your sins before receiving, so as to receive the Eucharist with a pure heart, freed from sin.

Aaron,

Agreed.  And the long-standing practice in the Latin Church of confession being scheduled on Saturday afternoons effectively recognized this.  I haven't frequented a Latin Church in way too many years to know to what extent that practice continues.  In the Eastern and Oriental Catholic Churches, the typical practice is to offer the Mystery prior to Divine Liturgy.

Many years,

Neil
Logged

"Not only is it unnecessary to adopt the customs of the Latin Rite to manifest one's Catholicism, it is an offense against the unity of the Church."

- Melkite Archbishop Joseph (Tawil), of blessed memory
queen
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 30


OC.net


« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2005, 11:31:49 AM »

People who want to confess to a stranger ISTM are not willing to deal properly with their sin.
**********************************************************************************************
 What does ISTM mean? And this statement, imo, is quite harsh and offensive to me. I am very willing to deal with my sins properly. It may not be the way you would do it, but it's not wrong.

Logged
Irish Melkite
Information Mongeror
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Melkite Greek-Catholic
Jurisdiction: Eparchy of Newton
Posts: 988


WWW
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2005, 11:42:16 AM »

What does ISTM mean?

Queen,

ISTM=It Seems To Me

Many years,

Neil
Logged

"Not only is it unnecessary to adopt the customs of the Latin Rite to manifest one's Catholicism, it is an offense against the unity of the Church."

- Melkite Archbishop Joseph (Tawil), of blessed memory
Αριστοκλής
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese
Posts: 10,026


« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2005, 12:09:39 PM »

Hi queen,
Those impious Greeks!  Wink

I am not aware of any minimum standards for piety in any Orthodox Church - no rulebook per se. Somehow it would seem that not confessing would be a sin in itself; and that establishing a minimum requirement also skirts a legalized approach to practising the Faith that seems foreign to Orthodoxy.
In the four Greek parishes in three dioceses (now metropolis) that I have worshipped in over the last 40 years the priests have always enouraged at least a once a year confession. In that frequent communion was rare in the Greek Churches until recently it was usually during Holy Week that confession was encouraged and expected as was communing.
In my current GOA parish once per year is stated by my priest as a minimum. All of Holy Week he is available to hear confessions and at any other time anyone wishes. These confessions by appointment, which Fr. Stephanos makes usually within the same day they are requested, actually work better for me (privacy and my long drive). Fr. Stephanos makes it well-known however that he would like WEEKLY confession.
In my wife's ACROD parish, weekly confession is offered after vespers every Saturday; the priest suggests monthly as a mimumum. Strangely, and something I have never seen or heard of before, this congregation actually put in its bylaws a four times a year minimum and payment of parish membership (the latter the priest correctly ignores) as a requirement for Communion!
Haven't really answered you, have I?

Demetri
Logged

"Religion is a neurobiological illness and Orthodoxy is its cure." - Fr. John S. Romanides
francis
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24



« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2005, 12:19:19 PM »

Quote
Wouldn't confessing after Mass make receiving the Eucharist before making that confession a sin?

Not in the Catholic Church. We believe that one can receive the Eucharist as long as you are not in a state of "mortal sin", but one can go to confession even for just "venial sins". So if one is not in mortal sin, he can receive the Eucharist at Mass, then go to confession afterwards to confess his venial sins.

That being said, it does seem backwards to me as well - I would much prefer to receive confession BEFORE receiving the Eucharist, not afterwards. Unfortunately, I think the main reason that confessions are heard after Mass is due to convenience; the time can be more open-ended, to allow for more people to go. For example, if Mass is on Saturday at 9:00am, and you start confessions at 8:00am, then there is a hard cut-off of 1 hour. However, if you have confessions after Mass, then they can go on for as long as people are in line. And before anyone makes the comment, the long lines do exist in many Catholic Churches (but not all, unfortunately).

Also, the Catholic Church does recommend going once a month for confession. Just this weekend, my daughter received her first confession, and the priest mentioned the monthly recommendation in the prayer service that was held. However, only once a year is required. Since I don't know the habits of every Catholic in the world, I can't comment on how many Catholics receive monthly, and how many receive less often.

Personally, my wife and I have set up a monthly appointment with our associate pastor to hear our confession. This has been wonderful to my soul. (Also, I have to admit: it would drive me crazy waiting in line for over an hour to have my confession heard during the "regular" time - I would inevitably have to confess this!)



Logged
prodromos
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 1,463

Sydney, Australia


« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2005, 06:21:18 AM »


 What does ISTM mean? And this statement, imo, is quite harsh and offensive to me. I am very willing to deal with my sins properly. It may not be the way you would do it, but it's not wrong.


I apologise for the poor wording of my post. What I meant to say is that those who are unwilling to properly deal with their sins are likely to take this approach. I did not intend to suggest the converse that (all) people who take this approach are unwilling to properly deal with their sins.
Please forgive me.

John.
Logged
prodromos
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 1,463

Sydney, Australia


« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2005, 06:36:24 AM »


Not in the Catholic Church. We believe that one can receive the Eucharist as long as you are not in a state of "mortal sin", but one can go to confession even for just "venial sins". So if one is not in mortal sin, he can receive the Eucharist at Mass, then go to confession afterwards to confess his venial sins.


Interesting. It is our understanding that the Eucharist is also for the forgiveness of sins. We partake of fire and those things within us which are the produce of our fallen nature are consumed and destroyed. I would have thought that if the Eucharist was approached in repentance with a proper understanding of our unworthiness to receive, then there would be no reason to go to confession afterwards.

John
Logged
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.079 seconds with 48 queries.