OrthodoxChristianity.net
July 29, 2014, 07:27:44 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Resurrection in the Torah  (Read 394 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Theophilos78
Warned
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: pro-Israeli Zionist Apostolic Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Adonai Yeshua
Posts: 2,043



« on: February 12, 2013, 07:26:15 PM »

Why is there no reference to the concept of bodily resurrection in the Torah? (I mean the 5 books attributed to Moses.) Any ideas?
Logged

Longing for Heavenly Jerusalem
rakovsky
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Church in America
Posts: 4,176



WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2013, 07:49:08 PM »

Why is there no reference to the concept of bodily resurrection in the Torah? (I mean the 5 books attributed to Moses.) Any ideas?
The idea of life after death at least exists there, as it says when Abraham "expired"(implying breathed out the soul), he went to his ancestors.
Logged
Romaios
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Romanian
Posts: 2,933



« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2013, 08:30:33 PM »

Why is there no reference to the concept of bodily resurrection in the Torah? (I mean the 5 books attributed to Moses.) Any ideas?

Because it hadn't been clearly revealed yet. It is only mysteriously alluded to in some Prophets (Ezekiel's vision of the dried bones, for instance) and becomes a tenet of (some strands of) Judaism only late in the Second Temple period (in apocalyptic writings such as the book of Daniel 12:13 - "But you, go your way, and rest; you shall rise for your reward at the end of the days"). This is why the Sadducees (who adhered to the Torah alone) were at odds with the Pharisees (who received the Prophets and the other books of the OT as canonical).

Our Lord refuted the Sadducees by quoting Torah, though: "You are wrong, because you know neither the Scriptures nor the power of God (to resurrect the dead). For in the resurrection they neither marry nor are given in marriage, but are like angels in heaven. And as for the resurrection of the dead, have you not read what was said to you by God, I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob? He is God not of the dead, but of the living." (Matthew 22:29-32)
Logged
Theophilos78
Warned
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: pro-Israeli Zionist Apostolic Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Adonai Yeshua
Posts: 2,043



« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2013, 02:12:02 PM »

Thanks for the answers!  Wink

What sounds baffling to me is that Egyptians believed in life after death whereas Moses said or wrote nothing explicit about that. Isn't this weird? Moses is sometimes accused of plagiarizing from Egyptians, but one of the fundamental doctrines of the Egyptian mythology (immortality of the soul) did not make its way into the Torah.

However, the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews associated Abraham's holocaust with the concept of being brought back to life:

By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac. He had received the promises, yet he was ready to offer up his only son. God had told him, “Through Isaac descendants will carry on your name,” and he reasoned that God could even raise him from the dead, and in a sense he received him back from there. (Hebrews 11:17-19)

Thus, we have at least implicit references to bodily resurrection in the narratives of the Torah. Why implicit? Maybe because the Law was about sin and death rather than with salvation and life.

Logged

Longing for Heavenly Jerusalem
Knee V
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 227



« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2013, 02:25:12 PM »

The Old Testament, in many respects, is like living in the night. It's dark and difficult to see, but there is some light reflecting off the moon, so we're not completely blind. And when we live by the moonlight, although we can roughly see where we are going, there are many weird and dark shadows which can make even that little bit of light to be confusing, as we look at one thing and think that we are seeing something else altogether. But as time goes on we get closer to dawn. And as dawn advances and we get close to sunrise, we begin to see more and more of the light of the sun itself, and not just its reflection off the moon. And finally the sun appears and we are able to see the source of light and we are able to see everything for what it truly is.

In that period we did not have the light of Christ as we do today. But his light shone through the prophets and we had just enough of His light to get by. But even with that light and that revelation through the prophets, many things were still unclear, and there were some things that we couldn't see at all. But as we got closer to Christ's incarnation, His light began to be more and more clear. And as you read the Scriptures that were written much later, especially those in the couple centuries just before Christ, there is much more clarity in those writings, and certain truths that were only barely discernible at the beginning are seen in much better light.

The resurrection is one of those things. In the days of Moses we can only see glimpses of it, and Christ Himself shed light on the resurrection in the Torah when He spoke to the Sadducees. But in the very last books to be written in the OT period, we can see the resurrection much more clearly. Take a look at 2Macc 7, where discussion of the resurrection is almost as explicate as what we find in the New Testament.
Logged
minasoliman
Mr., Sir, Dude, Guy, Male, tr. Minas in Greek, Menes in white people Egyptologists :-P
Section Moderator
Merarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic Orthodox Archdiocese of North America
Posts: 10,361


Strengthen O Lord the work of Your hands(Is 19:25)


WWW
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2013, 03:18:51 PM »

You're right Theophilus.  It's very hard to find anything about resurrection in the Torah.  I think the Torah was more concerned of human origins, Israel's origins, and the origin of the Mosaic Law.  It is why the Saducees, who reject all the other books of the Old Testament, but keep the Torah (I guess you can say like Protestants who reject Tradition but keep the Bible), this lead them also to not believe in Resurrection of the dead.

So the Torah's major purpose is not so much eschatological, but the origin of all things that are important for daily life and belief in Israel.

Notice however, how Christ quotes the Torah, as Knee V mentioned, to theologically refute their beliefs in a very logical manner:

"I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob" (Exodus 3:6).  God is not the God of the dead, but of the living. (Matthew 22:32)

It seems this really caused a lot of trouble for the Sadducees, because now, polemically speaking, Christ our God accused the Sadducees of worshipping the God of the dead, and insult to God's greatness.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 03:33:03 PM by minasoliman » Logged

Vain existence can never exist, for \\\"unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain.\\\" (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.
Tags: torah Resurrection  judaism  Bible 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.047 seconds with 33 queries.