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Author Topic: UOC-MP approves use of Ukrainian officially  (Read 1486 times) Average Rating: 0
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ialmisry
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« on: February 08, 2013, 06:18:54 PM »

Quote
The administrator of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Moscow Patriarchate, Metropolitan Antoniy of Boryspil, stated that the Ukrainian language can be used in the services in UOC-MP churches, reported ТSN.
http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/orthodox/uoc/51223/

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« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 06:19:40 PM by ialmisry » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2013, 06:27:10 PM »

This needed an official declaration? Huh
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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2013, 08:38:07 PM »

Quote
The administrator of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Moscow Patriarchate, Metropolitan Antoniy of Boryspil, stated that the Ukrainian language can be used in the services in UOC-MP churches, reported ТSN.
http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/orthodox/uoc/51223/

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ialmisry
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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2013, 10:00:08 PM »

This needed an official declaration? Huh
sadly, yes.
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2013, 10:05:48 PM »

Quote
The administrator of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Moscow Patriarchate, Metropolitan Antoniy of Boryspil, stated that the Ukrainian language can be used in the services in UOC-MP churches, reported ТSN.
http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/orthodox/uoc/51223/

Slava Bohu!

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Pan Google doesn't show his "h" instead of Gospodin's "g" that way.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 10:07:53 PM by ialmisry » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2013, 10:10:18 PM »

It has been used since a few years, what's the deal?

This is not a news.
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2013, 10:19:05 PM »

Quote
The administrator of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Moscow Patriarchate, Metropolitan Antoniy of Boryspil, stated that the Ukrainian language can be used in the services in UOC-MP churches, reported ТSN.
http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/orthodox/uoc/51223/

Slava Bohu!

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Pan Google doesn't show his "h" instead of Gospodin's "g" that way.

True, but I didn't think all here would approve of "latinika".    Wink Of course as a good 'rusnak' I would never read a 'г' as a 'g', but that's just me.

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« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2013, 10:25:08 PM »

It has been used since a few years, what's the deal?

This is not a news.

Hasn't it been a point of contention though between adherents of UOCMP and UOCKP and opposed by anti vernacular forces within the Russian Church per se? Perhaps the use of Russian is coming?
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« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2013, 10:37:30 PM »

It has been used since a few years, what's the deal?

This is not a news.

Hasn't it been a point of contention though between adherents of UOCMP and UOCKP and opposed by anti vernacular forces within the Russian Church per se? Perhaps the use of Russian is coming?

Use of Russian where?  And I believe it was pre-revolution that they actually worked on Russian texts did they not?
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« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2013, 10:39:15 PM »

Quote
The administrator of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Moscow Patriarchate, Metropolitan Antoniy of Boryspil, stated that the Ukrainian language can be used in the services in UOC-MP churches, reported ТSN.
http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/orthodox/uoc/51223/

Slava Bohu!

Слава Богу!  ...per Mr.Google .....
Pan Google doesn't show his "h" instead of Gospodin's "g" that way.

True, but I didn't think all here would approve of "latinika".    Wink Of course as a good 'rusnak' I would never read a 'г' as a 'g', but that's just me.



Smiley the r is never a g to me either.
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« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2013, 10:45:15 PM »

True, but I didn't think all here would approve of "latinika".  

Much better than English transliteration.

Quote
Of course as a good 'rusnak' I would never read a 'г' as a 'g', but that's just me.

QFT however in Belarussian there are a few words that have the sound "g", mostly loanwords.
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« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2013, 10:54:22 PM »

It has been used since a few years, what's the deal?

This is not a news.

Hasn't it been a point of contention though between adherents of UOCMP and UOCKP and opposed by anti vernacular forces within the Russian Church per se? Perhaps the use of Russian is coming?

Use of Russian where?  And I believe it was pre-revolution that they actually worked on Russian texts did they not?
No.  They use Slavonic (the Kiev recension, btw), not Russian.  They did manage to get a Russian translation of the Bible, though.
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« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2013, 10:55:43 PM »

It has been used since a few years, what's the deal?

This is not a news.
My understanding was that they looked the other way.  An official OK I never saw before.
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« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2013, 10:56:31 PM »

Quote
The administrator of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Moscow Patriarchate, Metropolitan Antoniy of Boryspil, stated that the Ukrainian language can be used in the services in UOC-MP churches, reported ТSN.
http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/orthodox/uoc/51223/

Slava Bohu!

Слава Богу!  ...per Mr.Google .....
Pan Google doesn't show his "h" instead of Gospodin's "g" that way.

True, but I didn't think all here would approve of "latinika".    Wink
Ordinarily, I never would.
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« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2013, 10:57:50 PM »

Quote
The administrator of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Moscow Patriarchate, Metropolitan Antoniy of Boryspil, stated that the Ukrainian language can be used in the services in UOC-MP churches, reported ТSN.
http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/orthodox/uoc/51223/

Slava Bohu!

Слава Богу!  ...per Mr.Google .....
Pan Google doesn't show his "h" instead of Gospodin's "g" that way.

True, but I didn't think all here would approve of "latinika".    Wink
Ordinarily, I never would.

Especially since reading in Cyrillic isn't that hard.  But enough books were printed in Latinica (slavonic in the slovak alphabet) that you still find them everywhere here in the mountains.
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« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2013, 11:01:50 PM »

It has been used since a few years, what's the deal?

This is not a news.
My understanding was that they looked the other way.  An official OK I never saw before.

I wait for more breaking news:

"UOC-MP states that tomorrow is Saturday and Sunday comes afterwards"
"UOC-MP approves the usage of electricity"

etc...

It's RISU making UOC look like some neanthertals and anti-patriots. Nothing more.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 11:03:04 PM by Michał Kalina » Logged

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« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2013, 04:28:05 PM »

It has been used since a few years, what's the deal?

This is not a news.
My understanding was that they looked the other way.  An official OK I never saw before.

I wait for more breaking news:

"UOC-MP states that tomorrow is Saturday and Sunday comes afterwards"
"UOC-MP approves the usage of electricity"

etc...

It's RISU making UOC look like some neanthertals and anti-patriots. Nothing more.
I am aware that RISU is a front for the UGCC, and that I could easily had missed a similar announcement before. But I never saw one.
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« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2013, 02:17:39 AM »

It has been used since a few years, what's the deal?

This is not a news.
My understanding was that they looked the other way.  An official OK I never saw before.

I wait for more breaking news:

"UOC-MP states that tomorrow is Saturday and Sunday comes afterwards"
"UOC-MP approves the usage of electricity"

etc...

It's RISU making UOC look like some neanthertals and anti-patriots. Nothing more.
I am aware that RISU is a front for the UGCC, and that I could easily had missed a similar announcement before. But I never saw one.

This it not an announcement. That metropolitan only described the situation that had already been occurring for X years.
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« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2013, 11:16:54 AM »

I often hear about how everyone in Ukraine at least knows Russian so you can get by. I was on a bus in west Ukraine traveling between Lviv and Poland, and a few people about in their 40's were walking the aisle drinking and talking to me obscenely in some mix of Polish and Ukrainian I did not understand. Unfortunately only one guy near me on the bus could speak Russian and he seemed to feel rather bored with it as if it was normal.

I was surprised to see a graph showing that while in the late 1980's it was true that many people (about half) in West Ukraine could speak Russian fluently, few of them could about 15 years later in Ternopil and Lviv.

It was also surprising that few people could speak Ukrainian in Crimea, even though I know Russian is the language there.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2013, 11:22:12 AM by rakovsky » Logged
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« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2013, 11:18:30 AM »

Your map link is broken.  

EDIT:  Never mind, it's there now.
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« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2013, 11:54:33 AM »

I often hear about how everyone in Ukraine at least knows Russian so you can get by. I was on a bus in west Ukraine traveling between Lviv and Poland, and a few people about in their 40's were walking the aisle drinking and talking to me obscenely in some mix of Polish and Ukrainian I did not understand. Unfortunately only one guy near me on the bus could speak Russian and he seemed to feel rather bored with it as if it was normal.

I was surprised to see a graph showing that while in the late 1980's it was true that many people (about half) in West Ukraine could speak Russian fluently, few of them could about 15 years later in Ternopil and Lviv.

It was also surprising that few people could speak Ukrainian in Crimea, even though I know Russian is the language there.

If you speak Russian in western Ukraine you will often get slower service or be ignored altogether. If you speak Ukrainian in eastern Ukraine you will either get laughed at as a peasant yokel or praised by those who wish they had a better command of the language. 
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« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2013, 12:05:00 PM »


LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.

I was also yelled at, in Russian, for being a traitor to Ukraine.

I just can't win.

To Ukrainians I am a traitor, to non-Ukrainians I am a nationalistic fanatic.
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« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2013, 01:20:19 PM »


LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.

I was also yelled at, in Russian, for being a traitor to Ukraine.

I just can't win.

To Ukrainians I amr a traitor, to non-Ukrainians I am a nationalistic fanatic.


What sounded like a Polish Ukrainian mixture was likely the local dialect of Halychan/Gallician Ukrainian. In Uzhorod you might hear what  would sound like a mix of Ukrainian, Slovak with a dash of Hungarian, in villages near Bardejev or Presov in Slovakia, you ears would pick up a Slovak sounding dialect laced with Ukrainian and a few Polish words. Those would be variants of the Rusyn Ukrainian dialect of which linguists disagree, some view it as a language, others as a dialect. To my ancestors, it was simply "ponashemu", meaning "ours" or "our way." One cautionary note, don't expect any service in those places if you order in Russian. You would likely be understood,but you would just be ignored.
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« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2013, 02:43:29 PM »


LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.

I was also yelled at, in Russian, for being a traitor to Ukraine.

I just can't win.

To Ukrainians I am a traitor, to non-Ukrainians I am a nationalistic fanatic.


I know people from Kharkiv, but they are western transplants.   They are pleased to speak Ukrainian to someone although it is difficult for them because they have used Russian on a daily basis for many years.  Still an east vs west thing I guess. 
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« Reply #24 on: November 18, 2013, 06:02:51 PM »


LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.

I was also yelled at, in Russian, for being a traitor to Ukraine.

I just can't win.

To Ukrainians I am a traitor, to non-Ukrainians I am a nationalistic fanatic.

I went to a Ukrainian Catholic convent today. The secretary and cleaner were nice and we had a conversation in Russian. They were both from Western Ukraine and surprised me that they could speak Russian well. They both left Ukraine about 10 years ago though and sometimes visit.

Nationalist chauvinism reminds me of strep throat. In some cases it develops into scarlet fever.
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« Reply #25 on: November 18, 2013, 06:05:30 PM »

Quote
One cautionary note, don't expect any service in those places if you order in Russian. You would likely be understood,but you would just be ignored.
I will have to bring a Ukrainian-Russian interpreter with me to Western Ukraine. (joke)

I think if you are a foreigner they should give you a pass. Otherwise they are being like Parisians and giving visitors from far away countries a hard time for no good reason.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2013, 06:07:55 PM by rakovsky » Logged
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« Reply #26 on: November 18, 2013, 06:06:08 PM »


LOL!  No joke.  Bring one.
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« Reply #27 on: November 18, 2013, 06:07:01 PM »

Quote
One cautionary note, don't expect any service in those places if you order in Russian. You would likely be understood,but you would just be ignored.
I will have to bring a Ukrainian-Russian interpreter with me to Western Ukraine. (joke)

I understand both but can speak none.
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« Reply #28 on: November 18, 2013, 06:08:52 PM »


Why can't you speak it?

If you understand, that means you have a good grasp of the vocabulary and conjugation, etc.

The sounds are very similar to Polish, although I think Poles use more of a "sh" sound in their words.

You should learn to speak it, too.

Smiley
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« Reply #29 on: November 18, 2013, 06:18:45 PM »

I stayed in a landlady's place for a few weeks. She was from Lviv and hated Russian language. Unfortunately she knew it well and did not speak English, while I did not speak Ukrainian. That forced us to speak Russian, since I could not learn Ukrainian fast enough, although I wish I could. She did not like that and it may have played a factor in how I ended up having to look for a new place to stay.
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« Reply #30 on: November 18, 2013, 06:47:43 PM »

Oops...  Undecided
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« Reply #31 on: November 18, 2013, 07:07:17 PM »


Why can't you speak it?

If you understand, that means you have a good grasp of the vocabulary and conjugation, etc.

As a speaker of Belarusian, Podlachian and Polish, as a person who has been listening to sermons in Russian since I remember I have not many problems with understanding Russian or Ukrainian. However when I try to actively use them I start to mix it with Belarusian or Podlachian. Especially in pronunciation, and some vocabulary issues.
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« Reply #32 on: November 18, 2013, 07:41:27 PM »

Oops...  Undecided
It was rarely a problem for me in a personal way in the course of a month in Kiev and visiting a few places outside of it.

The main thing was my landlady and a similar person who was supervising me, and the bus situation. In another example I was at the Pechersk Lavra and I asked a random visitor for directions in Russian. He asked "Do you speak Ukrainian?" I said "Badly" in Russian. He repeated that to himself slowly and tensely. Then he gave me directions. (weird).
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« Reply #33 on: November 19, 2013, 02:38:54 PM »

LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.
Можливо, Ви говорите українською з акцентом, який в Україні називають "канадським". З таким акцентом іноді навмисне звертаються до російськомовних людей, щоб їх позлити, бо цей акцент не завжди зразу зрозуміеш, і він не дуже милозвучній у порівнянні з літературною мовою. Я ні в Криму не мав проблем, говорячи українською, ні в Закарпатті, говорячи російською.

Perhaps You are speaking Ukrainian with a accent, which is Ukraine called the "Canadian". With this accent sometimes deliberately turning to Russian people to annoy them, for the emphasis is not always immediately understand, and it is not very euphonious compared to the standard language. I'm not in the Crimea had no problems speaking Ukrainian or in Transcarpathia, speaking Russian.
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« Reply #34 on: November 19, 2013, 02:46:07 PM »

LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.
Можливо, Ви говорите українською з акцентом, який в Україні називають "канадським". З таким акцентом іноді навмисне звертаються до російськомовних людей, щоб їх позлити, бо цей акцент не завжди зразу зрозуміеш, і він не дуже милозвучній у порівнянні з літературною мовою. Я ні в Криму не мав проблем, говорячи українською, ні в Закарпатті, говорячи російською.


Yeah. English dialect of Ukrainian sounds funny.
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« Reply #35 on: November 19, 2013, 03:07:04 PM »


Why can't you speak it?

If you understand, that means you have a good grasp of the vocabulary and conjugation, etc.

The sounds are very similar to Polish, although I think Poles use more of a "sh" sound in their words.

You should learn to speak it, too.

Smiley


Polish does have alot of sh sounds with subtle variations, like rz, sz, s', and then cz, c' ......  My Polish grandfather, who also spoke Russian, said Russian sounded like "funny Polish".....  I shared this with a Russian co-worker, who said, "No!  Polish sounds like "funny Russian"!!!!".  Cheesy
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« Reply #36 on: November 19, 2013, 03:09:53 PM »

It's not Polish I have my skills from.
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« Reply #37 on: November 19, 2013, 03:29:45 PM »

LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.
Можливо, Ви говорите українською з акцентом, який в Україні називають "канадським". З таким акцентом іноді навмисне звертаються до російськомовних людей, щоб їх позлити, бо цей акцент не завжди зразу зрозуміеш, і він не дуже милозвучній у порівнянні з літературною мовою. Я ні в Криму не мав проблем, говорячи українською, ні в Закарпатті, говорячи російською.


Yeah. English dialect of Ukrainian sounds funny.

It depends, I suppose. My dad was born here in Pennsylvania in 1917, learned English as a second language as only the Rusyn dialect was spoken at home and in the neighborhood he grew up in. When he visited Presov eighty years later or so for the first time, he was asked all of the time when he moved to America as he sounded like a native.
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« Reply #38 on: November 19, 2013, 03:34:31 PM »

LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.
Можливо, Ви говорите українською з акцентом, який в Україні називають "канадським". З таким акцентом іноді навмисне звертаються до російськомовних людей, щоб їх позлити, бо цей акцент не завжди зразу зрозуміеш, і він не дуже милозвучній у порівнянні з літературною мовою. Я ні в Криму не мав проблем, говорячи українською, ні в Закарпатті, говорячи російською.


Yeah. English dialect of Ukrainian sounds funny.

It depends, I suppose. My dad was born here in Pennsylvania in 1917, learned English as a second language as only the Rusyn dialect was spoken at home and in the neighborhood he grew up in. When he visited Presov eighty years later or so for the first time, he was asked all of the time when he moved to America as he sounded like a native.

I mean your "r" and some vowel differences. It is noticeable. Grammar and vocabulary might be fine but you won't overcome pronunciation.

I had a similar impression while listening to HE Mark's (Strand) sermon when he visited my parish.
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« Reply #39 on: November 19, 2013, 03:51:34 PM »

LOL!  Yes, I was totally ignored in Kharkiv (Eastern Ukraine) when I spoke Ukrainian to the desk clerk at the hotel.  She had no idea or desire to help me find a bottle of water, even.  Only when I fished in my brain and found the Russian word, did she deem to raise her finger and point me in the right direction.
Можливо, Ви говорите українською з акцентом, який в Україні називають "канадським". З таким акцентом іноді навмисне звертаються до російськомовних людей, щоб їх позлити, бо цей акцент не завжди зразу зрозуміеш, і він не дуже милозвучній у порівнянні з літературною мовою. Я ні в Криму не мав проблем, говорячи українською, ні в Закарпатті, говорячи російською.


Yeah. English dialect of Ukrainian sounds funny.

It depends, I suppose. My dad was born here in Pennsylvania in 1917, learned English as a second language as only the Rusyn dialect was spoken at home and in the neighborhood he grew up in. When he visited Presov eighty years later or so for the first time, he was asked all of the time when he moved to America as he sounded like a native.

I mean your "r" and some vowel differences. It is noticeable. Grammar and vocabulary might be fine but you won't overcome pronunciation.

I had a similar impression while listening to HE Mark's (Strand) sermon when he visited my parish.

I think that one of the problems in the United States was the blending of accents. My grandparents were from the Saris region near modern Poland, the neighbors may have been from Mamaramosh which was Hungarian orientated. others were Lemkos or Gallicians. While the language they spoke was the same, they picked up idioms and regional words in a blend which sounded odd in the old world - especially when contact was virtually cut off from say 1930 to 1988 or so....And of course, old country dialects changed over time as well since language is an ever evolving thing..
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« Reply #40 on: November 20, 2013, 08:56:37 PM »


It was rarely a problem for me in a personal way in the course of a month in Kiev and visiting a few places outside of it.

The main thing was my landlady and a similar person who was supervising me, and the bus situation. In another example I was at the Pechersk Lavra and I asked a random visitor for directions in Russian. He asked "Do you speak Ukrainian?" I said "Badly" in Russian. He repeated that to himself slowly and tensely. Then he gave me directions. (weird).
what do you expect??!? them to brighten with joy that you're a guest of ukraine speaking to ukrainians in the langauge of their former occupiers??

if you think you were treated bad try speaking russian to random people in lithuania, latvia, estonia - i hope you know how to fight if you try
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« Reply #41 on: November 20, 2013, 09:05:00 PM »


It was rarely a problem for me in a personal way in the course of a month in Kiev and visiting a few places outside of it.

The main thing was my landlady and a similar person who was supervising me, and the bus situation. In another example I was at the Pechersk Lavra and I asked a random visitor for directions in Russian. He asked "Do you speak Ukrainian?" I said "Badly" in Russian. He repeated that to himself slowly and tensely. Then he gave me directions. (weird).
what do you expect??!? them to brighten with joy that you're a guest of ukraine speaking to ukrainians in the langauge of their former occupiers??

if you think you were treated bad try speaking russian to random people in lithuania, latvia, estonia - i hope you know how to fight if you try
IOW Rakovsky you should spend your dollars in Russia.
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« Reply #42 on: November 20, 2013, 09:38:34 PM »

I have heard a dialect spoken in a Pennsylvanian cathedral oh 7 yrs ago that neither I or the guy from Ukraine (western) could understand. Lots of the Slovak descendants here woukd speak to me in a language that sounded like.slovak meshed with sort of Ukrainian.  Most of that generation is gone now. They were fabulous people.
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« Reply #43 on: November 20, 2013, 09:38:50 PM »


It was rarely a problem for me in a personal way in the course of a month in Kiev and visiting a few places outside of it.

The main thing was my landlady and a similar person who was supervising me, and the bus situation. In another example I was at the Pechersk Lavra and I asked a random visitor for directions in Russian. He asked "Do you speak Ukrainian?" I said "Badly" in Russian. He repeated that to himself slowly and tensely. Then he gave me directions. (weird).
what do you expect??!? them to brighten with joy that you're a guest of ukraine speaking to ukrainians in the langauge of their former occupiers??

if you think you were treated bad try speaking russian to random people in lithuania, latvia, estonia - i hope you know how to fight if you try
Khello Зантрон. When I talk with American Indians I use English, when I talk with Irish I speak English, and when I talk with native people from Mexico I use Spanish. I think people should just understand that speaking a language does not make you offensive.

I am not sure it is right to call Russia the conqueror of Ukraine either, because much of Ukraine, like the Cossack region, developed together with Russia. In fact, some Cossacks were especially loyal to the Tsar. In fact, many OCA people did not have a particularly negative feeling about Russia when they emigrated to America.

But going back to more examples, if I went to India and spoke English there I think it would be OK. And even though Vietnam actually forced out the empires (unlike Ukraine where it was voluntary), I would be OK with speaking English or French and I assume Vietnamese would not have so much of an issue with my language per se.

Regarding Latvia and Estonia, if I had to talk to someone in English and they did not understand me, Yes I would talk in Russian. If I have to go to the bathroom for example I am hardly going to hold it for hours or try to signal to them with my hands what I mean because of nationalist ignorance.

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« Reply #44 on: November 20, 2013, 09:41:27 PM »

I have heard a dialect spoken in a Pennsylvanian cathedral oh 7 yrs ago that neither I or the guy from Ukraine (western) could understand. Lots of the Slovak descendants here woukd speak to me in a language that sounded like.slovak meshed with sort of Ukrainian.  Most of that generation is gone now. They were fabulous people.
That's cool. I suppose if you went to the Rusyn parts of Slovakia that is more like what you would hear.
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