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Author Topic: THE UKRAINE: A BOUGHT ELECTION?  (Read 1015 times) Average Rating: 0
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Etienne
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« on: January 02, 2005, 07:40:04 PM »

I like others followed the election saga in the Ukraine, and the related discussion here on OC.net. The campaign raised a number of questions for me. How did the 'Orange' supporters fund and organise their extensive campaign and the sheer logistics that went with it? Why was the focus on the so-called independent observers so one-sided? What explained the seemingly impossibly high turn-outs in some districts?

Of course the story we were peddled in the western press was full of items on the 'fixing' of the election voting results by supporters of Viktor Yanukovich. The ugly poisoning of his pro-western rival, Viktor Yushschenko. And tbe malign influence of the Russian government of Vladimir Putin.

On OC.net post after post expressed outrage at the blatant interference of these malign influences and the 'right' of the people of the Ukraine to determine their own future without external interference. Some appeared to have very strong views which appeared related to their religious affilation, a sort of tribal cheer leading. Occasionally a lone voice expressed the view that the role of Bishops and clergy was not to be seen to be actively involved in party politics. Given that Christ made it clear that His kingdom was not of this world, I inclined to this view but remained out of the fray.

Today I found an article in a British conservative tabloid newspaper, The Mail on Sunday, which articulates for me my doubts and perhaps answers some of my questions. Some may quibble and say my country would never do that or that it supports democracy throughout the world. To those I suggest a little research and the ability to seperate your countries declared aims from the actions of its administrations, over years and up until the present day.

The arrticle is written by Mark Almond, a lecturer in Modern History at the prestigous Oriel College, Oxford, England
It is headlined: ANOTHER VICTORY FOR THE PRETTY GIRL IN THE ORANGE SCARF AND THE CIA - The Western governments are buying elections in Ukraine and elsewhere, according to an academic who fought to bring democracy to the East. And he ought to know - he once helped to deliver the money.......

".....Sadly, the images from Ukraine which spread so much Christmas cheer were just that, images. I have monitored previous polls in Ukraine and more than 70 others across the ex-Communist world, and I know that, on election day, the devil is in the details........

......Politics is about power everywhere, and people will do a lot to get hold of it. Ukraine's murky politics was made evident by the grotesque disfigurement of Mr Yushchenko, allegedly poisoned by his rivals. Yet to back up whatever sympathy Mr Yushchenko got for his ruined looks, the West poured in money by the sackful.

The Americans alone gave pro-Yushchenko groups at least -ú50 million. That is more than was spent in rich Britain on our General Election in 2001.

In Ukraine, people count themselves lucky to earn as much as -ú 150 a month. You don't have to be a bright kid with a calculator to work out how much influence mega-bucks can buy in poverty-stricken, post-Soviet societies or Third World countries that are just starting out on the road to democracy.

If Russia was pouring equivalent sums into elections in Ireland or Belgium, there would be an international outcry.....

In the run-up to to the collapse of Communism in 1989 and the first contested elections in Eastern Europe, I took money to the dissidents there who were about to become the new ruling class. Some of the money came from genuine charities trying to help dissidents. But that was peanuts compared with the amounts that the CIA and our own secret service funnelled into the region....

One academic who handed me a brick of $ 30,000 in April, 1989, at Heathrow Airport to smuggle through to East European dissidents was a big spokesman for Ukraine's Orange Revolution and pooh-poohed the idea of Western cash funding all those orange banners and free food........

Sometimes dubious results backing the Bad Guy are queried while similar problems in regions voting for the Western candidate are ignored. Hundreds of thousands of people have migrated from Western Ukraine to work in Western Europe, yet in two regions with the highest rate of emigration, 96 per cent of adults were supposed to have voted and more than 90 per cent of them for the man in the orange scarf.

Of the 38 polling stations where 100 per cent of people officially voted in the discredited November 21 vote, 37 went orange. But is was the lonely unanimous vote for the other guy that had our observers up in arms........"



The lengthy article continues quoting examples of western interference in Russia, and the author himself finding that he had apparently been registered and voted in an election in Azerbaijan. He writes that the observers too are part of the problem, and are chosen by the same western governments who clearly seek to influence the outcome by funnelling funds to their chosen prot+¬g+¬. While I cannot say with certainty whether or not the allegations made are factual I have wondered about the funding and organisation of the large-scale Orange operation in the Ukraine, given its' peoples incomes, etc., etc. The voting figures read like something from a rotten banana republic or a novel.

Of course most of us rely on the broadcast media and press for our information but even so the images shown raised as many questions as they answered.
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Strelets
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2005, 08:15:54 PM »

How did the 'Orange' supporters fund and organise their extensive campaign and the sheer logistics that went with it? Why was the focus on the so-called independent observers so one-sided?

A huge amount of money was provided by local businesses tired of the regime. The business class in western Ukraine and Kiev are strongly pro-Yuschenko. Now ask yourself about the 300 million dollars poured into the Yanukovich campaign by the Kremlin. I've seen no evidence that the US gave money to the Yuschenko campaign and you need to provide more credible sources than the British Helsinki Human Rights Group.

The arrticle is written by Mark Almond, a lecturer in Modern History at the prestigous Oriel College, Oxford, England

Aaaaahhh, yes. Mark Almond, one of the BHHRG trio, which claims to "monitor" elections and come up with the most silly reports without a shred of evidence - no list of journalists, no evidence at all that they are there at the scene. Really funny how these stories keep coming back to this bogus organization.

Read more here:
http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/newboard/index.php/topic,4622.0.html
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Strelets
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2005, 08:22:52 PM »

http://www.guardian.co.uk/letters/story/0,,1373721,00.html
Rewriting the transition to democracy

Wednesday December 15, 2004
The Guardian

A number of recent articles in British newspapers have presented the "orange" revolution in Ukraine as an element of some sort of American bid for world domination. Instead of an authentic revolution we have a stage-managed coup, designed to weaken Russia and gain access to new markets. Politics is reduced to an interplay between world powers, and history to a story of corruption. This ignores one essential element: the Ukrainian people.

Mark Almond (The price of people power, December 7) rewrites the history of the last quarter century in central Europe to more forcibly elucidate the horrors awaiting Ukraine if it chooses the pro-European path of its western neighbours.

What actually happened in central Europe? Our societies rejected communist dictatorships and embarked on the project of building democratic systems of freedom and the rule of law. The breakthrough in 1989 followed efforts of those who refused the yoke of oppression - members of Poland's Solidarity, of Charter 77 in Czechoslovakia, and Hungarian dissidents.

Almond sees that "springtime of nations" quite differently. He paints a grotesque picture of US-funded dissidents acquiring personal fortunes while putting their nations in economic slavery. I was often accused by the communist regime of being a mercenary and an American spy. I am staggered to encounter similar accusations today.

I am equally astounded by what Almond writes about Adam Michnik: "His Agora media empire grew out of the underground publishing world of Solidarity, funded by the CIA in the 1980s. His newspapers now back the war in Iraq, despite its huge unpopularity among Poles."

Almond fails to mention that Michnik spent six years as a political prisoner. He also omits to note that Michnik is not the owner of Agora, and that when the company gave shares to its founders and employees, Michnik refused to take any. And that the Iraq war is the subject of fierce debate in Gazeta Wyborcza.

Fortunately, neither the opinions of western commentators nor any designs of US politicians will determine Ukraine's future. It will be decided by the Ukrainians.

Prof Bronislaw Geremek
Former Solidarity adviser and Polish foreign minister
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"The creed is very simple, and here is what it is: to believe that there is nothing more beautiful, more courageous, and more perfect than Christ; and there not only isn't, but I tell myself with a jealous love, there cannot be." ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky
Jakub
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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2005, 09:29:31 PM »

Politics are no different in Europe vs US of A, $>$>$.

Need to research, ck agendas, etc yada yada yada

Its been like that for a couple of thusand years.

Power + $ = corruption

You vote for the best package that fits your values

james
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gphadraig
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« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2005, 09:26:52 AM »

I seem to recall that there was a time when it was very difficult to critizise the Soviet struggle for an egalitarian society in certain circles, indeed to say a bad word word about these promoters of a peace loving world was to court being labelled and ridiculed, if not worse.

The voting records in some districts in the recent election appear to produce results only seen in the sham elections of the most authoritarian and corrupt regimes. This point in the article is neatly sidestepped, critics here preferring the strategy of rubbishing the author of an article. I do not know the guy but he is a lecturer at Oxford, and I guess he just might know a bit.

Leaving him aside, the answer is given that business in the Ukraine raised the money. Really? Like the article this is also a claim unsupported by any evidence. So why should we accept this offering and not the first. The Guardian, a respected but very much a left-wing newspaper which tends to see the world in a luvie, New Labour sort of way.

The vast organisation and resources that would be needed to provide all the Orange items, hot drinks and food, plus wood for fires, etc., represents an enormous amount in a country that is not cash rich. The results, just appear to have little if any credidiblity if considered in the light of the vast experience there is in voting patterns in Europe and elsewhere.

We now know that the Soviets made much use of fellow travellers, and 'useful idiots'. The latter included many sincere people who were duped. In time will we find that it is not just the Soviets, but the west which has learnt and used these strategies and those of the arch-propagandist, Dr Goebbels?

As for the notion that you vote for the package that best suits? I suggest that in democracies one is often foolish to swallow the best presented package which you are persuaded will suit, only to find politicians promises are like their statements, momentary and largely meaningless.

And whatever happened to that notion of a government of the people, for the people, by the people?
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