Poll

What will Prostestanism be like in 50 years?

The Same (Same Groups)
3 (8.1%)
Smaller  (Many Denominations will cease to exist)
16 (43.2%)
Denominations will merge with one another
9 (24.3%)
Most Protestants will either joining the Roman Catholic Church or Eastern Church
4 (10.8%)
I am unsure
5 (13.5%)

Total Members Voted: 37

Author Topic: What, in your opinion, is the future of Protestantism?  (Read 3882 times)

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Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: What, in your opinion, is the future of Protestantism?
« Reply #45 on: May 08, 2013, 07:42:51 PM »
I believe that we're in for some interesting times and no one, even Orthodox, will be completely immune.  Of course, the Church will not change.  As far as Protestantism is concerned, I see a time when many will be looking towards the past, towards continuity and structure while other aspects will fracture even further.  I pray that they all come home to Eastern Orthodoxy and that the so-called Prosperity Gospel fades into a mere footnote.
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Offline lovesupreme

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Re: What, in your opinion, is the future of Protestantism?
« Reply #46 on: May 08, 2013, 08:00:23 PM »
I believe that we're in for some interesting times and no one, even Orthodox, will be completely immune.  Of course, the Church will not change.  As far as Protestantism is concerned, I see a time when many will be looking towards the past, towards continuity and structure while other aspects will fracture even further.  I pray that they all come home to Eastern Orthodoxy and that the so-called Prosperity Gospel fades into a mere footnote.

From a realistic perspective, I would be elated if America sees increased conversions from protestantism to Roman Catholicism. That will at least change the way the country sees the Bible and tradition.

I'm very troubled by the currently popular "religion in a vacuum" and "do-it-yourself" methods.

Offline primuspilus

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Re: What, in your opinion, is the future of Protestantism?
« Reply #47 on: May 10, 2013, 11:49:35 AM »
I know around my area people are really getting sick of the baptists and are moving to very high church or very low church.

Our local parish has grown alot in the last 3 years, as have the RC parishes. The prosperity gospel and non-denomination churches spring up, get tons of cash, then disappear in 5 years.
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Online Agabus

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Re: What, in your opinion, is the future of Protestantism?
« Reply #48 on: May 10, 2013, 12:11:51 PM »
I know around my area people are really getting sick of the baptists and are moving to very high church or very low church.

Our local parish has grown alot in the last 3 years, as have the RC parishes. The prosperity gospel and non-denomination churches spring up, get tons of cash, then disappear in 5 years.
Really strange around here is that, while they are completely low church, there are a handful of prosperity gospel leaders who dress in traditional clerical garb, mixing and matching Anglican and Roman styles.
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Offline Daedelus1138

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Re: What, in your opinion, is the future of Protestantism?
« Reply #49 on: May 10, 2013, 01:08:00 PM »
From a realistic perspective, I would be elated if America sees increased conversions from protestantism to Roman Catholicism. That will at least change the way the country sees the Bible and tradition.

  Roman Catholicism is actually not doing well once you factor out immigration.   There are some high-profile conversions but a great many people are not happy with the spiritual life in Roman Catholicism or the way the hierarchy has handled itself to the public.