Author Topic: Gospels and New Testament  (Read 342 times)

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Offline psalm110

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Gospels and New Testament
« on: January 01, 2013, 07:25:56 AM »
I am wondering when the Gospels Matthew, Luke, John, Mark - were compiled together ?.

And when was the whole New Testament compiled ?. What year ?. And was there Divine intervention when compiling the New Testament ?.

Thanks

Offline psalm110

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Re: Gospels and New Testament
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2013, 02:57:31 AM »
No one knows this ?  

Regarding Saint Nicholas of Myra he was thrown in prison for slapping Arius at the Nicene Council in front of King Constantine and had to be sent to jail and have his hand cut off "the hand that was used" to hit Arius. It is said in his jail cell Christ gave him the Gospels and The Panagia gave him his "priest uniform back". What Gospels did Christ give him ? The ones we have today were the gospels compiled in the 3rd century?.

Offline Justin Kissel

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Re: Gospels and New Testament
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2013, 03:26:32 AM »
I am wondering when the Gospels Matthew, Luke, John, Mark - were compiled together ?.

And when was the whole New Testament compiled ?. What year ?. And was there Divine intervention when compiling the New Testament ?.

Thanks

The four canonical gospels were compiled fairly early, as was a group of Paul's letters. We have references to all the Gospels in the 2nd century, and St. Ireneaus writing about 180 CE speaks of the four gospels. There was some dispute (e.g. with John, because of gnostics using it) but for the most part it seems to have been settled by the end of the second century. As for inspiraction and divine intervention, the most applicable statement is from the New Testament itself, when it was said: "It seemed good to the Holy Spirit and to us" (Acts 15:28). The organizing of the canon was also a work of both the Holy Spirit and people. And when people get involved, things don't always go smoothly.

The New Testament as we know it was almost unanimously settled (in Eastern Orthodox/Roman Catholic lands, anyway) by the end of the 4th century, with Sts. Athanasius, Gregory the Theologian, Jerome, and many other saints weighing in, in addition to councils. St. Athanasius is generally considered the first authorative voice to list the New Testament books as we have them, and that was in 367. It would be a few more years before everyone would come to a consensus, but not long. I wouldn't say there was divine intervention so much as divine inspiration gradually nudging the Church in the right direction.