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Author Topic: How do I go about going to another parish because I can't go to my primary one?  (Read 523 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: December 29, 2012, 06:18:05 PM »

Since the snow season wants to start earlier this year, there may be times when I cannot drive downtown because my car is the complete opposite of doing well in the snow.

So there is a Greek parish pretty close to me that I could go to. Should I just tell the priest there by email that I will attend on the off chance it snows (has snow) on Sunday? Do I need to do confession at that parish still before communing? How does this work?
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2012, 06:18:52 PM »

I visit my official  parish no more often than 3-4 times a year. I even have no idea who is the pastor there.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2012, 06:20:44 PM by Michał Kalina » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2012, 06:24:01 PM »

What kind of relationship do you have with the priests? Does the priest at the closer church know you? I'd say the best case scenario is for both to know you and your primary priest to call the second one and let him know the situation. Or if not that, then for the primary priest to call and then you introduce yourself to the second priest. If not that I'd call both and let them know what the situation is. Or if not call, then just do it in person after liturgy or vespers, which may be easier because then you won't have to play phone tag.
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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2012, 07:00:38 PM »

Honestly, although Asteriktos' advice is good, you'll probably be fine if you just show up at the other parish. I've never had any problem just showing up at a new parish and taking Communion. As far as confession goes, I'm not sure what sort of church your primary parish is, but in the Greek tradition you are not required to give confession each time you take Communion like you are in the Russian tradition. As long as you've confessed to your own priest recently enough, you'll be fine.
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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2012, 12:35:59 PM »

I visit my official  parish no more often than 3-4 times a year. I even have no idea who is the pastor there.

Looks like you're an ex-protestant. Right?

I wonder why your current Orthodox Parish doesn't restrict you from visiting your old Protestant church?
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 12:36:47 PM by kx9 » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2012, 12:50:16 PM »

I visit my official  parish no more often than 3-4 times a year. I even have no idea who is the pastor there.

Looks like you're an ex-protestant. Right?

No, I'm not.

Quote
I wonder why your current Orthodox Parish doesn't restrict you from visiting your old Protestant church?

I visit other Orthodox parishes.
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« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2012, 01:08:32 PM »

I visit my official  parish no more often than 3-4 times a year. I even have no idea who is the pastor there.

Looks like you're an ex-protestant. Right?

No, I'm not.

Quote
I wonder why your current Orthodox Parish doesn't restrict you from visiting your old Protestant church?

I visit other Orthodox parishes.

Alright, I asked that because you mentioned "Pastor" which is a term I haven't heard in the Orthodox Church. (Patriarch, Metropolitan, Bishop, Priest and Presbyter are generally used terms).

So instead of Pastor, you meant Presbyter or Priest instead?


Generally one must always stick to the official parish, visiting other parishes is permitted if one is unable to visit the official parish (i.e if one is far away from the official parish on that particular Sunday. i.e on a far-away trip or working/studying far away from home).
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 01:11:09 PM by kx9 » Logged
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« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2012, 01:17:43 PM »

Alright, I asked that because you mentioned "Pastor" which is a term I haven't heard in the Orthodox Church. (Patriarch, Metropolitan, Bishop, Priest and Presbyter are generally used terms).

So instead of Pastor, you meant Presbyter or Priest instead?

I meant "rector". There are 5-7 presbyters and about 3 deacons (IDK how many exactly). I cannot name all of them and IDK who is in charge of the parish.


Quote
Generally one must always stick to the official parish, visiting other parishes is permitted if one is unable to visit the official parish (i.e if one is far away from the official parish on that particular Sunday. i.e on a far-away trip or working/studying far away from home).


Says who?
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« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2012, 01:20:52 PM »

Alright, I asked that because you mentioned "Pastor" which is a term I haven't heard in the Orthodox Church. (Patriarch, Metropolitan, Bishop, Priest and Presbyter are generally used terms).

So instead of Pastor, you meant Presbyter or Priest instead?

I meant "rector". There are 5-7 presbyters and about 3 deacons (IDK how many exactly). I cannot name all of them and IDK who is in charge of the parish.


Quote
Generally one must always stick to the official parish, visiting other parishes is permitted if one is unable to visit the official parish (i.e if one is far away from the official parish on that particular Sunday. i.e on a far-away trip or working/studying far away from home).


Says who?

That is the rule in the Catholic Parish.

Eastern Orthodoxy and Catholicism have so many things in common. I thought that rule may be one, which both share.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 01:22:24 PM by kx9 » Logged
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« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2012, 01:21:57 PM »

But what would be the reason for that?
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« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2012, 01:23:12 PM »

But what would be the reason for that?

IDK.

The rule is there, and that's it. No idea.

I have noticed Catholics visiting other parishes, though.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 01:26:17 PM by kx9 » Logged
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« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2012, 02:33:01 PM »

I visit my official  parish no more often than 3-4 times a year. I even have no idea who is the pastor there.

What do you mean by "official parish"? In Finland Orthodoxy is the second state church so parochial lines go hand in hand with municipal lines. Is the situation similar in Poland?
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« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2012, 02:38:07 PM »

Yep. My family moved to another place 8 or 9 years ago but we keep attending our previous parish. I visit my new one only when I'm in a mood for Polish Liturgy while I'm in Białystok, or I'm doing some business in the city and do not want to go to the suburbs to my old parish church (the new one is in the city centre), or for St. Gabriel feast (his relics are there), or when I want to visit my godfather (he is a deacon there).
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 02:41:14 PM by Michał Kalina » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2012, 04:05:43 PM »

Since the snow season wants to start earlier this year, there may be times when I cannot drive downtown because my car is the complete opposite of doing well in the snow.

So there is a Greek parish pretty close to me that I could go to. Should I just tell the priest there by email that I will attend on the off chance it snows (has snow) on Sunday? Do I need to do confession at that parish still before communing? How does this work?

Communicate to your regular priest what your situation is. Communicate to the Greek priest what your situation is, possible attend a vespers service to get to meet and talk to him and introduce yourself. Continue confessing to your regular confessor, unless he tells you to do otherwise.
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« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2012, 03:14:12 PM »

Since the snow season wants to start earlier this year, there may be times when I cannot drive downtown because my car is the complete opposite of doing well in the snow.

So there is a Greek parish pretty close to me that I could go to. Should I just tell the priest there by email that I will attend on the off chance it snows (has snow) on Sunday? Do I need to do confession at that parish still before communing? How does this work?

Communicate to your regular priest what your situation is. Communicate to the Greek priest what your situation is, possible attend a vespers service to get to meet and talk to him and introduce yourself. Continue confessing to your regular confessor, unless he tells you to do otherwise.

Good advice, letting your parish priest know the score is essential so that he does not think that you are disaffected or left the parish for some reason. Believe me, even in the largest of parishes, the priest will take notice of such things and most will indeed worry about them!
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« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2012, 09:27:12 PM »

Alright, I asked that because you mentioned "Pastor" which is a term I haven't heard in the Orthodox Church. (Patriarch, Metropolitan, Bishop, Priest and Presbyter are generally used terms).

So instead of Pastor, you meant Presbyter or Priest instead?

I meant "rector". There are 5-7 presbyters and about 3 deacons (IDK how many exactly). I cannot name all of them and IDK who is in charge of the parish.


Quote
Generally one must always stick to the official parish, visiting other parishes is permitted if one is unable to visit the official parish (i.e if one is far away from the official parish on that particular Sunday. i.e on a far-away trip or working/studying far away from home).


Says who?

That is the rule in the Catholic Parish.

Eastern Orthodoxy and Catholicism have so many things in common. I thought that rule may be one, which both share.

There's no rule that binds people to go to any particular parish.

There was an ancient canon, so I've been told, that excommunicated those who missed church for three Sundays in a row without reasonable cause.
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« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2012, 09:59:21 PM »

But what would be the reason for that?

IDK.

The rule is there, and that's it. No idea.

I have noticed Catholics visiting other parishes, though.

True, I think. I've actually heard that you're supposed to get permission to frequent another parish that isn't your regular parish. I think it was about avoiding "parish-hopping" or something to that effect. I don't know if this is official/canon law, or just proper behavior, but it's definitely what I've heard from some Catholics.

I don't think this is relevant to Orthodox, though.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2012, 10:01:26 PM by Nephi » Logged
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« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2013, 09:51:22 AM »

Alright, I asked that because you mentioned "Pastor" which is a term I haven't heard in the Orthodox Church. (Patriarch, Metropolitan, Bishop, Priest and Presbyter are generally used terms).

So instead of Pastor, you meant Presbyter or Priest instead?

I meant "rector". There are 5-7 presbyters and about 3 deacons (IDK how many exactly). I cannot name all of them and IDK who is in charge of the parish.


Quote
Generally one must always stick to the official parish, visiting other parishes is permitted if one is unable to visit the official parish (i.e if one is far away from the official parish on that particular Sunday. i.e on a far-away trip or working/studying far away from home).


Says who?

That is the rule in the Catholic Parish.

Eastern Orthodoxy and Catholicism have so many things in common. I thought that rule may be one, which both share.

There's no rule that binds people to go to any particular parish.

There is here. It's called "address of residence".
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« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2013, 11:41:32 AM »

Alright, I asked that because you mentioned "Pastor" which is a term I haven't heard in the Orthodox Church. (Patriarch, Metropolitan, Bishop, Priest and Presbyter are generally used terms).

So instead of Pastor, you meant Presbyter or Priest instead?

I meant "rector". There are 5-7 presbyters and about 3 deacons (IDK how many exactly). I cannot name all of them and IDK who is in charge of the parish.


Quote
Generally one must always stick to the official parish, visiting other parishes is permitted if one is unable to visit the official parish (i.e if one is far away from the official parish on that particular Sunday. i.e on a far-away trip or working/studying far away from home).


Says who?

That is the rule in the Catholic Parish.

Eastern Orthodoxy and Catholicism have so many things in common. I thought that rule may be one, which both share.

There's no rule that binds people to go to any particular parish.

There is here. It's called "address of residence".

Just out of curiosity - in Poland does the church to which one belongs as a consequence of being the 'address of residence' have any  local (or shared for that matter) authority to register births, deaths, marriages etc for the state in lieu of a local civil registrar's office? Does a parish registry have legal status for proof of such happenings? Does the local parish obtain government financial support based upon its census? In the US none of these factors apply - but a bit of history - in Louisiana for example, counties are called 'parishes' - a throw back to the days of French rule prior to the Louisiana Purchase as the Catholic faith had a role in its governance which was foreign to the Anglo-American methodology.
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« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2013, 11:50:00 AM »

Marriages performed in the Church can be (and usually are) recognised by the state as civil marriages. IDK about other issues.
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