Author Topic: Paschal greeting in Somali?  (Read 552 times)

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Offline Alpo

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Paschal greeting in Somali?
« on: March 30, 2013, 11:58:49 AM »
Any suggestions?

Offline dzheremi

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Re: Paschal greeting in Somali?
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2013, 12:04:22 PM »
According to Pascha Polyglotta, it is "Ciise wuu soo daalacey ; runtii wuu soo daalacey." In Somali, the letter C corresponds to the Arabic 'ayn (this guy: ﻉ, representing a voiced pharyngeal fricative); long vowels are represented orthographically by doubling the letter.

Offline Alpo

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Re: Paschal greeting in Somali?
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2013, 12:22:52 PM »
D'uh! I thought I checked Paschal Polyglotta without any results. Thanks.

Pronunciation of Somali words seems rather cryptic. It could be fun to learn the language some day but I fear that I'd never learn how to properly pronounce it.

Offline dzheremi

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Re: Paschal greeting in Somali?
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2013, 12:28:30 PM »
I don't know. It doesn't seem very hard to me. The writing system and its correspondence to the spoken language seems pretty transparent, with the notable exception of lacking tone markers. If I recall correctly, Somali only has two tones, so it's probably easy to get a hang of once you're used to hearing the spoken language.

Offline Alpo

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Re: Paschal greeting in Somali?
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2013, 12:36:09 PM »
I don't know. It doesn't seem very hard to me. The writing system and its correspondence to the spoken language seems pretty transparent

I worked in a Somali-related project for some time and just about every time I tried to pronounce some Somali word to an actual Somali he/she didn't understand what I was talking about. :D
« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 12:38:28 PM by Alpo »