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Author Topic: Humility and spiritual progress  (Read 423 times) Average Rating: 0
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William
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« on: December 08, 2012, 08:42:48 PM »

If the greatest saints of all times are always going on about how they are great sinners, what incentive is there to practice the Gospel? People who are saints are actually still sinners. Unless they are being dishonest and overly pietist, you don't really make any spiritual progress, so what's the point?
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Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant
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« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2012, 08:56:06 PM »

They were humble and spiritually progressed and thus were more aware of their own sins and did not judge and seek out the sins of others, they saw themselves as the worst of sinners; this is just as Christ commanded us to be and how we should be. If they were not spiritually progressed they would not have such an attitude.

I don't really understand what you are getting at, it doesn't make sense.
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William
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« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2012, 09:19:34 PM »

They were humble and spiritually progressed and thus were more aware of their own sins and did not judge and seek out the sins of others, they saw themselves as the worst of sinners; this is just as Christ commanded us to be and how we should be. If they were not spiritually progressed they would not have such an attitude.

I don't really understand what you are getting at, it doesn't make sense.

Are people such as St. Seraphim of Sarov and St. Anthony the Great really the worst of sinners, though?
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Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant
Antonis
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You must try this Balkan blend, Barsanuphius.


« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2012, 11:25:02 PM »

Certainly not, but part of their sanctity was seeing themselves that way. Otherwise they would have fallen to pride.
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« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2012, 12:22:50 PM »

Admitting to yourself you're a sinner reaffirms the reality our will is not the Will of God to the psyche. With that realization, a person can then continue on his/her path to God with honest actions; rather than self-delusional, self-serving actions; to reaffirm their claims to both draw closer to God and to do His will.
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