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Author Topic: What types of Greek are there?  (Read 1209 times)
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« on: November 26, 2012, 03:15:15 PM »

I am so confused

What Greek was the Septuagint in? What Greek was the NT written in? What Greek did Saint John Chrysostom speak? What Greek was spoken in the later Ecumenical Councils?
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« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2012, 03:20:51 PM »

Koine, koine, koine and koine.
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« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2012, 03:28:29 PM »

Koine, koine, koine and koine.
Koine. Koine. Middle Greek (but he wrote and sermonized in Attic(ized)), "Byzantine" Greek.
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2012, 03:34:46 PM »

Do we know exactly how Koine Greek was actually pronounced?
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2012, 03:35:52 PM »

Koine, koine, koine and koine.
Koine. Koine. Middle Greek (but he wrote and sermonized in Attic(ized)), "Byzantine" Greek.

My Greek grammar book tell me that Middle Greek started from ~600 AD, which would include the Sixth and Seventh Ecumenical Councils. Some other works however say that middle greek was used from 330 onwards. I guess it would depend on which date you use.
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2012, 03:37:06 PM »

Do we know exactly how Koine Greek was actually pronounced?

Yes. It sounded very much like middle and modern Greek.
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2012, 03:41:11 PM »

ah okay

this reminds me, there was some website that had pictures of many manuscripts maybe it was of the septuagint and also the new testament I cannot remember the name of the website though, does any of it ring a bell?

thank you for your help!
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« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2012, 03:47:37 PM »

nevermind that though,

is this in koine greek?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/13/End_of_2_Peter_and_Beginning_of_1_John_in_Alexandrinus.JPG



Finally, where/how does one learn genuine koine greek?
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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2012, 03:51:16 PM »


Yes.

Finally, where/how does one learn genuine koine greek?

If you know Attic (aka Classical Greek) you know Koine.
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2012, 03:53:56 PM »

Do we know exactly how Koine Greek was actually pronounced?

Yes. It sounded very much like middle and modern Greek.

It did? What about Erasmian pronunciation?
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« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2012, 03:56:26 PM »

Do we know exactly how Koine Greek was actually pronounced?

Yes. It sounded very much like middle and modern Greek.

It did? What about Erasmian pronunciation?

Erasmian pronunciation is for Attic Greek, not Koine. And even then I doubt whether the Erasmian pronunciation was ever used, it is 'reconstructed' in the Renaissance and it sounds plain awful.
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« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2012, 03:59:18 PM »

I do not really care to learn classical/attic greek, only koine (i have no desire to read the illiad or homer or whatever!!!)

so is there any trusted places to learn it? or am i going to be stuck with the classical/attic greek and its controversies?
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« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2012, 04:02:57 PM »

I do not really care to learn classical/attic greek, only koine (i have no desire to read the illiad or homer or whatever!!!)

I learned classical Greek and I can read Koine easily. It's not any more different as British English is from American English.


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« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2012, 04:03:33 PM »

Do we know exactly how Koine Greek was actually pronounced?

Yes. It sounded very much like middle and modern Greek.

It did? What about Erasmian pronunciation?

Erasmian pronunciation is for Attic Greek, not Koine. And even then I doubt whether the Erasmian pronunciation was ever used, it is 'reconstructed' in the Renaissance and it sounds plain awful.

My university taught me Koine Greek with Erasmian pronunciation. Every kind of pronunciation of dead languages in reconstructed.
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« Reply #14 on: November 26, 2012, 04:08:07 PM »

I do not really care to learn classical/attic greek, only koine (i have no desire to read the illiad or homer or whatever!!!)

I learned classical Greek and I can read Koine easily. It's not any more different as British English is from American English.




i just sort of want to stay away from classical because it might be pronounced differently

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« Reply #15 on: November 26, 2012, 04:08:40 PM »

but anyway, where does a poor man learn koine greek?  Tongue
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« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2012, 04:16:33 PM »

I do not really care to learn classical/attic greek, only koine (i have no desire to read the illiad or homer or whatever!!!)

I learned classical Greek and I can read Koine easily. It's not any more different as British English is from American English.




i just sort of want to stay away from classical because it might be pronounced differently



You're not supposed to really pronounce it. Are you going to hold conversations in Koine or something? It's about reading and translating I suppose. And no, AFAIK there's no seperate Koine class.

but anyway, where does a poor man learn koine greek?  Tongue

I can't answer that one. I learned Greek in high school but I assume you're too old for that  Tongue
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« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2012, 04:19:41 PM »

I do not really care to learn classical/attic greek, only koine (i have no desire to read the illiad or homer or whatever!!!)

I learned classical Greek and I can read Koine easily. It's not any more different as British English is from American English.




i just sort of want to stay away from classical because it might be pronounced differently



You're not supposed to really pronounce it. Are you going to hold conversations in Koine or something? It's about reading and translating I suppose. And no, AFAIK there's no seperate Koine class.

how can one read without pronouncing it in ones head!?

and okay

now where could one learn classical (non  Erasmian) greek without having to spend a thousand dollars? Tongue
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« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2012, 04:21:05 PM »

I do not really care to learn classical/attic greek, only koine (i have no desire to read the illiad or homer or whatever!!!)

I learned classical Greek and I can read Koine easily. It's not any more different as British English is from American English.




i just sort of want to stay away from classical because it might be pronounced differently



You're not supposed to really pronounce it. Are you going to hold conversations in Koine or something? It's about reading and translating I suppose. And no, AFAIK there's no seperate Koine class.

but anyway, where does a poor man learn koine greek?  Tongue

I can't answer that one. I learned Greek in high school but I assume you're too old for that  Tongue

what high school was that!? well, I live in the US and the public school offered Spanish German and French.

i am 19, so no i don't think i can go back to high school, they might even think i am a pedophile!  police police police
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« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2012, 04:21:32 PM »

I do not really care to learn classical/attic greek, only koine (i have no desire to read the illiad or homer or whatever!!!)

I learned classical Greek and I can read Koine easily. It's not any more different as British English is from American English.


i just sort of want to stay away from classical because it might be pronounced differently


You're not supposed to really pronounce it. Are you going to hold conversations in Koine or something? It's about reading and translating I suppose. And no, AFAIK there's no seperate Koine class.

how can one read without pronouncing it in ones head!?

and okay

now where could one learn classical (non  Erasmian) greek without having to spend a thousand dollars? Tongue

I suppose you could learn Attic from books and then learn the Koine pronunciation separatly. I'm sure those books won't cost a thousand dollars.

what high school was that!? well, I live in the US and the public school offered Spanish German and French.

A Dutch Roman Catholic high school. But even many public schools offer it here.
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« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2012, 04:32:54 PM »

I do not really care to learn classical/attic greek, only koine (i have no desire to read the illiad or homer or whatever!!!)

I learned classical Greek and I can read Koine easily. It's not any more different as British English is from American English.


i just sort of want to stay away from classical because it might be pronounced differently


You're not supposed to really pronounce it. Are you going to hold conversations in Koine or something? It's about reading and translating I suppose. And no, AFAIK there's no seperate Koine class.

how can one read without pronouncing it in ones head!?

and okay

now where could one learn classical (non  Erasmian) greek without having to spend a thousand dollars? Tongue

I suppose you could learn Attic from books and then learn the Koine pronunciation separatly. I'm sure those books won't cost a thousand dollars.

what high school was that!? well, I live in the US and the public school offered Spanish German and French.

A Dutch Roman Catholic high school. But even many public schools offer it here.

ah

well i did try rosetta stone to learn the modern greek but i could only afford the online subscription for a year

now im out of money and i must depend on the internet Sad
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« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2012, 05:00:59 PM »

ah

well i did try rosetta stone to learn the modern greek but i could only afford the online subscription for a year

now im out of money and i must depend on the internet Sad

If you're in the U.S., a lot of public library systems offer Rosetta Stone to cardholders. You might also look into Wikiversity--I have found their Spanish materials to be very helpful whenever I am gearing up for Mexico.
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« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2012, 07:29:40 PM »

Do we know exactly how Koine Greek was actually pronounced?

Yes. It sounded very much like middle and modern Greek.

It did? What about Erasmian pronunciation?

Erasmian pronunciation is for Attic Greek, not Koine. And even then I doubt whether the Erasmian pronunciation was ever used, it is 'reconstructed' in the Renaissance and it sounds plain awful.

Again there is NO SUCH THING as Erasmian pronunciation outside of weird back to the Greek Bible circles.

Go to a real classics department and run this game if you want to get laughed at.

Attic is always being reconstructed that is what philologists do.

I sat through debates (impromptu) by serious classists arguing over pronunciation of attic Greek all the time.

Erasmus developed a method. A needed one.

And you are kidding yourself if you think the Greek of today is what "Greek" sounded like even in 20 AD.

Sheesh. This should be common sense to those who have had the opportunity to experience today a language with a long history which circles much of the known world: English.

Oh how will people 2000 years from now know think I sounded if there are no recorded media left and just fragments of writing here and there?  

If they come up with how Akimori sounds, well they will be far off.
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« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2012, 02:11:41 PM »


Again there is NO SUCH THING as Erasmian pronunciation outside of weird back to the Greek Bible circles.

Go to a real classics department and run this game if you want to get laughed at.

Attic is always being reconstructed that is what philologists do.

I sat through debates (impromptu) by serious classists arguing over pronunciation of attic Greek all the time.

Erasmus developed a method. A needed one.

And you are kidding yourself if you think the Greek of today is what "Greek" sounded like even in 20 AD.

Sheesh. This should be common sense to those who have had the opportunity to experience today a language with a long history which circles much of the known world: English.

Oh how will people 2000 years from now know think I sounded if there are no recorded media left and just fragments of writing here and there? 

If they come up with how Akimori sounds, well they will be far off.

You do realise that Erasmus based his pronunciations exclusively on lyrical poetry (the Greek lyrical poetry being exceptionally fragmentary)? Koine of 20 AD sounded much closer to modern Greek than Erasmian pronunciation does to Koine. The sound of the 'η' for example is pronounced as 'i' in Koine, Middle, Byzantine and Modern Greek but as è (as in everybody) in the Erasmian pronunciation.
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« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2012, 10:17:40 PM »

Is the LXX still koine It seems like there would be some differences?  Undecided
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« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2012, 11:02:16 PM »


Again there is NO SUCH THING as Erasmian pronunciation outside of weird back to the Greek Bible circles.

Go to a real classics department and run this game if you want to get laughed at.

Attic is always being reconstructed that is what philologists do.

I sat through debates (impromptu) by serious classists arguing over pronunciation of attic Greek all the time.

Erasmus developed a method. A needed one.


And you are kidding yourself if you think the Greek of today is what "Greek" sounded like even in 20 AD.

Sheesh. This should be common sense to those who have had the opportunity to experience today a language with a long history which circles much of the known world: English.

Oh how will people 2000 years from now know think I sounded if there are no recorded media left and just fragments of writing here and there? 

If they come up with how Akimori sounds, well they will be far off.

You do realise that Erasmus based his pronunciations exclusively on lyrical poetry (the Greek lyrical poetry being exceptionally fragmentary)? Koine of 20 AD sounded much closer to modern Greek than Erasmian pronunciation does to Koine. The sound of the 'η' for example is pronounced as 'i' in Koine, Middle, Byzantine and Modern Greek but as è (as in everybody) in the Erasmian pronunciation.
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« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2012, 09:08:28 AM »

Do we know exactly how Koine Greek was actually pronounced?

Yes. It sounded very much like middle and modern Greek.

It did? What about Erasmian pronunciation?

Erasmian pronunciation is for Attic Greek, not Koine. And even then I doubt whether the Erasmian pronunciation was ever used, it is 'reconstructed' in the Renaissance and it sounds plain awful.

Again there is NO SUCH THING as Erasmian pronunciation outside of weird back to the Greek Bible circles.

Go to a real classics department and run this game if you want to get laughed at.

Attic is always being reconstructed that is what philologists do.

I sat through debates (impromptu) by serious classists arguing over pronunciation of attic Greek all the time.

Erasmus developed a method. A needed one.

And you are kidding yourself if you think the Greek of today is what "Greek" sounded like even in 20 AD.

Sheesh. This should be common sense to those who have had the opportunity to experience today a language with a long history which circles much of the known world: English.

Oh how will people 2000 years from now know think I sounded if there are no recorded media left and just fragments of writing here and there?  

If they come up with how Akimori sounds, well they will be far off.
Since no-one living in 20 AD is still around, I'm afraid there's no evidence of the correct pronunciation of the Greek of the 1st c. AD.
On the other hand we have evidence of the convergence of pronunciation of Attic diphthongs and η with plain iota atleast since Plato. Plato in his dialogue Cratylus writes that the name of Poseidon derives from the fact that he is the Posidesmos (the foot-shackler) of seas: "Τὸν οὖν ἄρχοντα τῆς δυνάμεως ταύτης θεόν ᾠνόμασεν Ποσειδῶνα ὅς Ποσίδεσμον ὄντα". One problem then occurs for the followers of Eramian pronunciaton: according to them, "Ποσσειδῶν" is pronounced differently from "Ποσίδεσμος", thus either Plato does not know what he writes, or they must have missed something
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« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2012, 10:53:47 AM »

Koine, koine, koine and koine.
Koine. Koine. Middle Greek (but he wrote and sermonized in Attic(ized)), "Byzantine" Greek.

My Greek grammar book tell me that Middle Greek started from ~600 AD, which would include the Sixth and Seventh Ecumenical Councils. Some other works however say that middle greek was used from 330 onwards. I guess it would depend on which date you use.

May I ask which grammar book(s) you used?
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« Reply #28 on: December 01, 2012, 10:58:57 AM »

Koine, koine, koine and koine.
Koine. Koine. Middle Greek (but he wrote and sermonized in Attic(ized)), "Byzantine" Greek.

My Greek grammar book tell me that Middle Greek started from ~600 AD, which would include the Sixth and Seventh Ecumenical Councils. Some other works however say that middle greek was used from 330 onwards. I guess it would depend on which date you use.

May I ask which grammar book(s) you used?

A dutch one. Pallas 4 to be more specific.
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