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Author Topic: Do all Eastern orthodox church using Greek bible ?  (Read 593 times) Average Rating: 0
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walter1234
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« on: November 26, 2012, 11:09:14 AM »

Do all Church in Eastern Orthodox Church use the bible with Greek lanaguage?
« Last Edit: November 26, 2012, 11:09:31 AM by walter1234 » Logged
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« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2012, 11:17:19 AM »

No.

Do we all use a Bible translated from the LXX. No, but we should.
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« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2012, 11:23:29 AM »

The original language of the New Testament was Greek, and the Church has always used the Septuagint - a pre-Christian translation of the Hebrew Old Testament into Greek - because this is considered to be more accurate than the Hebrew Masoretic Text (dating from the 7-10th centuries AD) used by Jews and Protestants today.

However, except for those Orthodox parishes which use Greek as their primary liturgical language, Scripture readings will be from a translation into whatever language is used for the rest of the Liturgy - Slavonic, Romanian, English, etc.

In the West, most translations of the Old Testament are based on the Masoretic Texts rather than the Septuagint used by the Church. For that reason, many Orthodox churches currently use translations of the Bible that are not based on the Greek text. Hopefully this will change as better translations from the Septuagint become available in those languages.
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2012, 11:27:04 AM »

The original language of the New Testament was Greek, and the Church has always used the Septuagint - a pre-Christian translation of the Hebrew Old Testament into Greek - because this is considered to be more accurate than the Hebrew Masoretic Text (dating from the 7-10th centuries AD) used by Jews and Protestants today.

However, except for those Orthodox parishes which use Greek as their primary liturgical language, Scripture readings will be from a translation into whatever language is used for the rest of the Liturgy - Slavonic, Romanian, English, etc.

In the West, most translations of the Old Testament are based on the Masoretic Texts rather than the Septuagint used by the Church. For that reason, many Orthodox churches currently use translations of the Bible that are not based on the Greek text. Hopefully this will change as better translations from the Septuagint become available in those languages.
To be fair, in the East the Russian Synodal Bible is also based on the MT, a rare error for St. Filaret.  And a lot of Arabic speakers use Bibles translated from the MT.
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2012, 11:47:55 AM »

Historically, Syriac-speaking Eastern Orthodox used the Peshitta, and sometimes Arabic translations made from the Peshitta. In the World History by Agapius of Manbij (d. 941/2), there's a long polemic against this, based on the fact that the lifespans of the patriarchs in the LXX and the Peshitta are different, which gives a different age for the world.
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2012, 01:37:32 PM »

Historically, Syriac-speaking Eastern Orthodox used the Peshitta, and sometimes Arabic translations made from the Peshitta. In the World History by Agapius of Manbij (d. 941/2), there's a long polemic against this, based on the fact that the lifespans of the patriarchs in the LXX and the Peshitta are different, which gives a different age for the world.
The Peshitta, however, has been repeatedly revised to conform to the LXX.
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2012, 01:44:00 PM »

Quote
The Peshitta, however, has been repeatedly revised to conform to the LXX.

Depends on which book. Isaiah, yes. Genesis, no. Job, no. I forget the rest.
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« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2012, 03:22:51 PM »

No.

Do we all use a Bible translated from the LXX. No, but we should.
amen!

The saint I share my name with, St. Justin Martyr, said that even in his time (2nd century) the Hebrew Old Testament text had been altered by the Jews to remove some of the more obvious prophecies of the death of Jesus Christ. One can only imagine what else they altered, if the Maserotic text is from the Middle Ages...
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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2012, 03:39:43 PM »

Problem is that there is not one version of the LXX as there is of the MT. Which text should be used?
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« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2013, 04:00:43 AM »

The original language of the New Testament was Greek, and the Church has always used the Septuagint - a pre-Christian translation of the Hebrew Old Testament into Greek - because this is considered to be more accurate than the Hebrew Masoretic Text (dating from the 7-10th centuries AD) used by Jews and Protestants today.

However, except for those Orthodox parishes which use Greek as their primary liturgical language, Scripture readings will be from a translation into whatever language is used for the rest of the Liturgy - Slavonic, Romanian, English, etc.

In the West, most translations of the Old Testament are based on the Masoretic Texts rather than the Septuagint used by the Church. For that reason, many Orthodox churches currently use translations of the Bible that are not based on the Greek text. Hopefully this will change as better translations from the Septuagint become available in those languages.
To be fair, in the East the Russian Synodal Bible is also based on the MT, a rare error for St. Filaret.  And a lot of Arabic speakers use Bibles translated from the MT.

St. Philaret also said in his Catechism that the deuterocanon were not considered Scripture by the Church. Perhaps he was influenced by the Masoretic text's canon.

St. Jerome was also influenced by this, and Martin Luther and the Reformers after him.
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2013, 08:53:18 AM »

St. Philaret also said in his Catechism that the deuterocanon were not considered Scripture by the Church. Perhaps he was influenced by the Masoretic text's canon.

St. Jerome was also influenced by this, and Martin Luther and the Reformers after him.

He was almost certainly influenced by the many Fathers who also excluded it, from earlier times (St. Gregory the Theologian) through later times (St. John of Damascus) into more modern times (as he himself shows). Though the Orthodox--until it recently went out of vogue because it became associated with those evil Protestants--did show a certain fascination with Hebrew elements related to the Scripture; for example, many Fathers numbered the books of the OT canon according to the letters in the Hebrew bible. So there is a connection apparently there.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2013, 08:55:19 AM by Asteriktos » Logged

St. Basil is great!

Wonder if he drank goat's milk . . .

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