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Author Topic: Number of Cathoilics converting  (Read 2288 times) Average Rating: 0
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converted viking
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« on: November 15, 2012, 09:18:54 PM »

Hi:

I am curious if any group  keeps statistics as to the numbers of Catholics converting to Orthodoxy and if so what do the numbers show.   I was a RC for 30 plus years before becoming a Greek Catholic who finally made it home to the Orthodox Church.

Seraphim/ Einar
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« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2012, 10:26:59 PM »

I was a cradle Roman Catholic who started going to the Melkite Greek Catholic Church for 2.5 years.
Then I was received into Orthodoxy with several other parishioners. We had started studying papal infallibility and supremacy, and when those Vatican I doctrines were torpedoed, the RCC was history.
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2012, 02:02:07 AM »

IDK if there are any actual statistics, but mark me down as a RC-to-EO convert (I haven't been chrismated yet, but that's just a small little detail  angel )
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« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2012, 02:26:29 AM »

I'm one as well, but I don't think we keep track of which "delusions" are being renounced at the services lol.
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« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2012, 02:39:38 AM »

I'm one as well, but I don't think we keep track of which "delusions" are being renounced at the services lol.
What, they don't put a tick next to "Roman Catholic" every service? Suddenly, as a former Baptopalian, I feel singled out.
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« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2012, 02:42:59 AM »

I am a convert from Roman Catholicism, too.
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« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2012, 09:55:39 AM »

I'm also a convert from RC Church (however, I must admit that my father is Serbian Orthodox and I had not been given any choice in which Church I would be baptised, so my mother had decided that it should be her Church).

I know some Polish that are converts from Catholicism, there are every year some convertions. In my parish (in Warsaw) there are very few (two per year?) conversions, but I think in the Warsaw metropolitan cathedral for sure there are more. That's interesting to note that in Poland there are more converts to Orthodoxy in terrain that traditionally don't have much in common with Orthodoxy, and less in Podlachia (at least that's my observation), that has been quite Orthodox for ages.
I think for fascinated by eastern Christianity Poles Greek Catholic is less attractive, because there is only the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church which is strongly connected with the nation.
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« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2012, 08:49:32 PM »

I am a former Catholic in the process of becoming Orthodox, too.

It's interesting that before I began my conversion, I had the sense that many of the Orthodox converts in the U.S. were Catholics, but anecdotally, since I've begun meeting people in Seattle and Vancouver, most of the converts seem to have come from Protestantism. Of course, Protestants are the majority in the U.S. and Canada, especially out here in the WASPy (and increasingly secular) Pacific NW, but this has still surprised me. Ultimately, I think Catholics tend to be quite rooted people for whom religious faith is often wrapped up with family and ethnic identity moreso than it would be for Protestants.
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« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2012, 09:36:20 PM »

I am a former Catholic in the early stages of becoming orthodox (catechumenate).


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« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2012, 11:10:13 PM »

Former Roman Catholic who converted last August. I have not informed the parish where I was baptized of my conversion. Do you think it is opportune to do this?

Conversion statistics would be interesting, but where to find them?
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« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2012, 11:39:28 PM »

I am a former Catholic with Lutheran and Anglican following family members.
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« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2012, 12:53:26 AM »

I'm a Roman Catholic who has been practicing Byzantine Rite Catholicism the last 2 years. Will be converting soon Wink
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« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2012, 01:05:03 AM »

Former Roman Catholic who converted last August. I have not informed the parish where I was baptized of my conversion. Do you think it is opportune to do this?

Conversion statistics would be interesting, but where to find them?

Ask your priest.

I had to write a letter to my Catholic priest and bishop before being accepted into the catechumenate.
It was difficult.
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« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2012, 02:52:52 AM »

Former Roman Catholic who converted last August. I have not informed the parish where I was baptized of my conversion. Do you think it is opportune to do this?

Conversion statistics would be interesting, but where to find them?

Ask your priest.

I had to write a letter to my Catholic priest and bishop before being accepted into the catechumenate.
It was difficult.

You were required to do that?
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converted viking
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« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2012, 12:00:34 PM »

Former Roman Catholic who converted last August. I have not informed the parish where I was baptized of my conversion. Do you think it is opportune to do this?

Conversion statistics would be interesting, but where to find them?

Ask your priest.

I had to write a letter to my Catholic priest and bishop before being accepted into the catechumenate.
It was difficult.


Huh?   Not me, that seems odd to me but then what do I  know?

Einar
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« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2012, 12:29:19 PM »

I was a catechumen for a month and a half prior to my conversion, and my future Orthodox priest did not require anything. He does not even require that I inform the RCC of my apostasy, now that I am fully converted.

Some Orthodox (the priest mentioned above not being one of whom) think it is better to downplay the number of converts from the RCC so as not to be accused of active proselytism.

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« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2012, 05:58:23 PM »

What I did was to inform my priest and parish that I was drawn towards orthodoxy in June and wrote a letter and left the church.
It was difficult in a way that being outside of any church at all. But I trust in God, pray and learn now by reading, attending weekly services and develop a prayer life.
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« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2012, 08:27:00 PM »

Another RCtoEO here  Smiley
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« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2012, 09:54:56 PM »

I am a former Catholic with Lutheran and Anglican following family members.

Were you all Roman Catholic? Has each one of you followed a different path?
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« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2012, 07:44:33 AM »

I am a reluctant RC "trad" who has grudgingly accepted the irreconcilable problems with the Roman Church and am very slowly coming to Orthodoxy. I am currently attending Saturday Vespers and speaking to the priest.

Truth has a way of not letting you escape once it finds you.
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« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2012, 03:10:11 PM »

I went from RC 30+ years to UGCC for around 2, saw the truth and left for Orthodoxy.   

Einar/Seraphim
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« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2012, 03:43:34 PM »

Two OCA military chaplains I knew in Iraq were former Roman Catholics who became Byzantine Catholics who became Orthodox!
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« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2012, 04:33:43 PM »

I went from RC 30+ years to UGCC for around 2, saw the truth and left for Orthodoxy.   

Einar/Seraphim

You owe me royalties on this story because this sounds exactly like mine  Wink
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« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2012, 05:19:24 PM »

I wonder how many went down the same path?   In my case at least it would be a long story, I must confess that it was my anger that caused me to take a long hard look.  A bad thing I know and it took me awhile to put down my ax and stop grinding it on the sharpening stone of hell until I came to a place that I could honestly convert.  Sometimes the bad can be turned to good.

Seraphim
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« Reply #24 on: November 28, 2012, 05:55:35 PM »

I went from regular Latin to Orthodox without the Eastern Catholic step in between. I didn't like Eastern Catholicism when I tried it (on the recommendation of my Father of Confession and the RCIA director of the parish I was attending). Probably if I had liked it I would've ended up EO eventually, without even thinking of (or really knowing anything about) the OO, where I eventually ended up. That's kind off, relative to the usual "RC turned Orthodox" story, I guess (I don't think it's as weird as other people seem to), but I suppose that's proof that you have to go where God calls you, even if we don't have an equivalent to the OCA (though I've heard of some Copts trying to make one sort of ad hoc; not sure how I feel about that).

Eh...these struggles are difficult enough without worrying about such things! Smiley
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« Reply #25 on: November 28, 2012, 06:06:54 PM »

I wonder how many went down the same path?   In my case at least it would be a long story, I must confess that it was my anger that caused me to take a long hard look.  A bad thing I know and it took me awhile to put down my ax and stop grinding it on the sharpening stone of hell until I came to a place that I could honestly convert.  Sometimes the bad can be turned to good.

Seraphim

It's funny because I know some Orthodox who are claiming that the "uniates" were nothing more than a vehicle of proselytizing by the Roman Catholic Church to get the Orthodox into their fold.  But the reality is, at least by my experience, is that a lot of RCs who become Eastern Catholics end up being Orthodox.  I think it is Rome's own fault, as they floated this idea of "Orthodox in communion with Rome" and when RCs who become insterested in Orthodoxy go to an EC parish and then they started learning more about Orthodoxy from Orthodox sources, they realize that what is in the EC parish is not Orthodoxy.  There are some who are authentically Orthodox in praxis and belief, but those parishes are few and far in between.  And there are those who are successful in recrating the externals of Orthodox worship and Liturgical life, but the inner spirituality is still very Roman.

Not to say there no Orthodox parishes with their own issues with lacking spirituality.  I have heard stories of Orthodox people taking a preference to the Eastern Catholic parishes in their area over their own parish.  But I think generally the Eastern Catholics come up short in their claim of "Orthodox in communion with Rome" which is the source of the problem.  And at times I advocated (on online forums) for ECs to just accept that and be honest with themselves and with others.  I'm not saying they are lying to other people, I just think that most are in denial.  The parish I go to have very good Christians, you can't deny them that.  And we're a very Latinized parish.  So why not just admit that is who you are?  A combination of Roman Catholicism and Orthodoxy that in itself has developed through a few centuries.  They'll keep more "converts" that way if they set the expectation from the beginning.
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« Reply #26 on: November 28, 2012, 06:08:43 PM »

I went from regular Latin to Orthodox without the Eastern Catholic step in between. I didn't like Eastern Catholicism when I tried it (on the recommendation of my Father of Confession and the RCIA director of the parish I was attending). Probably if I had liked it I would've ended up EO eventually, without even thinking of (or really knowing anything about) the OO, where I eventually ended up. That's kind off, relative to the usual "RC turned Orthodox" story, I guess (I don't think it's as weird as other people seem to), but I suppose that's proof that you have to go where God calls you, even if we don't have an equivalent to the OCA (though I've heard of some Copts trying to make one sort of ad hoc; not sure how I feel about that).

Eh...these struggles are difficult enough without worrying about such things! Smiley

Given you tried it, you still sort of went through it even though you had a quicker realization that it doesn't suit you.  I guess those who tend to linger around being EC the longest are those who have a hard time letting go of the Papacy, and also those who have family that are devout RCs.
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« Reply #27 on: November 28, 2012, 10:30:06 PM »

I went from RC 30+ years to UGCC for around 2, saw the truth and left for Orthodoxy.   

Einar/Seraphim

You owe me royalties on this story because this sounds exactly like mine  Wink

Choy. I am confused, I see your jurisdiction is UGCC, is that still the case.  Just curious.

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« Reply #28 on: November 28, 2012, 11:18:18 PM »

Former Roman Catholic who converted last August. I have not informed the parish where I was baptized of my conversion. Do you think it is opportune to do this?

Conversion statistics would be interesting, but where to find them?

I have not contacted anyone though my friends from my Eastern Catholic parish know and the word is out, no one was surprised and some saw it coming.  Some of those friends are now on their journey to Orthodoxy!   I think I will ask Father if I should send an official letter.

Seraphim
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« Reply #29 on: November 28, 2012, 11:25:12 PM »

I went from regular Latin to Orthodox without the Eastern Catholic step in between. I didn't like Eastern Catholicism when I tried it (on the recommendation of my Father of Confession and the RCIA director of the parish I was attending). Probably if I had liked it I would've ended up EO eventually, without even thinking of (or really knowing anything about) the OO, where I eventually ended up. That's kind off, relative to the usual "RC turned Orthodox" story, I guess (I don't think it's as weird as other people seem to), but I suppose that's proof that you have to go where God calls you, even if we don't have an equivalent to the OCA (though I've heard of some Copts trying to make one sort of ad hoc; not sure how I feel about that).

Eh...these struggles are difficult enough without worrying about such things! Smiley

Given you tried it, you still sort of went through it even though you had a quicker realization that it doesn't suit you.  I guess those who tend to linger around being EC the longest are those who have a hard time letting go of the Papacy, and also those who have family that are devout RCs.

All of my dad's side of the family is or was RC. I think only a few cousins still identify with it in any way, but I'm not very close to that side of the family, so who knows. Meh. And I guess you're right about the EC thing, I did try it, but only at the request of my FOC, who thought it might suit me better than the Latin Church. I meant how it seems to be more usual for people who are attracted to eastern spirituality but don't want to give up the Roman Pope to actually join an Eastern Catholic church before moving on, but I guess that's all a matter of degree. Either way, it just wasn't for me.
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« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2012, 01:00:25 AM »

I went from RC 30+ years to UGCC for around 2, saw the truth and left for Orthodoxy.   

Einar/Seraphim

You owe me royalties on this story because this sounds exactly like mine  Wink

Choy. I am confused, I see your jurisdiction is UGCC, is that still the case.  Just curious.



Yes.  But in the New Year I'm going to the OCA.
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« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2012, 01:01:48 AM »

All of my dad's side of the family is or was RC. I think only a few cousins still identify with it in any way, but I'm not very close to that side of the family, so who knows. Meh. And I guess you're right about the EC thing, I did try it, but only at the request of my FOC, who thought it might suit me better than the Latin Church. I meant how it seems to be more usual for people who are attracted to eastern spirituality but don't want to give up the Roman Pope to actually join an Eastern Catholic church before moving on, but I guess that's all a matter of degree. Either way, it just wasn't for me.

The Eastern Catholic Church weens us off the Pope.  Having your own Patriarch and hierarchy destroys that paradigm of a supreme universal bishop.
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« Reply #32 on: November 29, 2012, 01:03:59 AM »

So why are there still Eastern Catholic Churches, then?
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« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2012, 01:07:37 AM »

I went from RC 30+ years to UGCC for around 2, saw the truth and left for Orthodoxy.   

Einar/Seraphim

You owe me royalties on this story because this sounds exactly like mine  Wink

Choy. I am confused, I see your jurisdiction is UGCC, is that still the case.  Just curious.



Yes.  But in the New Year I'm going to the OCA.
Welcome aboard!
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« Reply #34 on: November 29, 2012, 01:33:41 AM »

So why are there still Eastern Catholic Churches, then?

Cradles.  I can't speak for the other Eastern Catholic Churches, but the UGCC is very instrumental in the cultural identity of those from Western Ukraine through the long period that they were not a nation.  That is from the destruction of Rus until the fall of the Soviet Union.  The UGCC helped them maintain their identity through everything they went through as a people so it is unlikely they will give that up lightly.  Though many here in the diaspora have since moved on to become RCs or even left the Catholic Church but not necessarily become Orthodox.
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« Reply #35 on: November 29, 2012, 01:34:11 AM »

I went from RC 30+ years to UGCC for around 2, saw the truth and left for Orthodoxy.   

Einar/Seraphim

You owe me royalties on this story because this sounds exactly like mine  Wink

Choy. I am confused, I see your jurisdiction is UGCC, is that still the case.  Just curious.



Yes.  But in the New Year I'm going to the OCA.
Welcome aboard!

Not so fast Wink
It'll come.  But I need to do my due diligence with my current Church.
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« Reply #36 on: November 29, 2012, 06:06:43 AM »

So why are there still Eastern Catholic Churches, then?

Cradles.  I can't speak for the other Eastern Catholic Churches, but the UGCC is very instrumental in the cultural identity of those from Western Ukraine through the long period that they were not a nation.  That is from the destruction of Rus until the fall of the Soviet Union.  The UGCC helped them maintain their identity through everything they went through as a people so it is unlikely they will give that up lightly.  Though many here in the diaspora have since moved on to become RCs or even left the Catholic Church but not necessarily become Orthodox.

I've noticed this in Romania - the Greek Catholics are always referred to as Ukrainian and the Ukrainians (in the border regions there are a lot - my wife's maiden name, for instance, is Ukrainian) who attend an Orthodox church are generally referred to as Russian. Seems like ethnicity is the overriding factor and, interestingly, I know of cradle Greek Catholics married to Orthodox who switched to Orthodoxy as a result and appear to see absolutely no issues with the change in faith at all - they seem to have always believed they were Orthodox anyway, even if they weren't.

James
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« Reply #37 on: November 29, 2012, 12:02:48 PM »

Choy

Opps, sorry about that.  If I had been paying more attention I would have seen that you are in the process.  Sometimes I get in a hurry and scroll through the posts too fast.  I have two big dogs that love to play that get on my case if I ignore them,  they don't like competing with the laptop. (-;

Viking
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« Reply #38 on: November 29, 2012, 03:27:32 PM »

Choy

Opps, sorry about that.  If I had been paying more attention I would have seen that you are in the process.  Sometimes I get in a hurry and scroll through the posts too fast.  I have two big dogs that love to play that get on my case if I ignore them,  they don't like competing with the laptop. (-;

Viking

No worries.  Saying goodbye is the hardest thing especially when you have nothing but love and respect to the people around you.  Which is why I am taking so long.
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