Author Topic: Uni Question  (Read 263 times)

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Offline Niko92

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Uni Question
« on: July 08, 2016, 01:49:53 AM »
Have a question for Uni that I can pick to answer (I don't have to as there are 12 but thought this would be a good one) that is:
Explain the attributes of the ‘Omni-God’ of Abrahamic belief. Which of these attributes do you think are necessary for a theist understanding of “God"?
Now I wanted to answer it from an Orthodox perspective but have had trouble finding any sources online that go in depth on it. It seems to be a western Christian concept.
Does anyone have any sources?

Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Uni Question
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2016, 01:04:52 AM »
I would not think that the "Omni-God of the Jews" is a very Orthodox concept, so you might need to fill us in on what your course means by that (what are those "attributes" it assigns to that) before we could help you very much.
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

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Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Niko92

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Re: Uni Question
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2016, 06:19:56 AM »
I believe what they are trying to get at is the omni-benevolence, omniscience, omnipotent etc etc of God. However I did some research and it seems to be a very Catholic/Protestant thing they talk about rather then an Eastern Orthodox one.

Offline MalpanaGiwargis

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Re: Uni Question
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2016, 10:53:51 AM »
I believe what they are trying to get at is the omni-benevolence, omniscience, omnipotent etc etc of God. However I did some research and it seems to be a very Catholic/Protestant thing they talk about rather then an Eastern Orthodox one.

In the form your assignment is asking, it is very much a Catholic thing that was inherited by Protestants with a systematic theology streak. All of those ideas are found in Orthodoxy, of course, and the liturgical hymns certainly reference all of them, but I'm not sure the degree to which they were the object of speculative theology in Orthodox circles.
Woe is me, that I have read the commandments,
   and have become learned in the Scriptures,
and have been instructed in Your glories,
   and yet I have become occupied in shameful things!

(Giwargis Warda, On Compunction of Soul)

Offline Hinterlander

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Re: Uni Question
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2016, 10:58:15 AM »
Does this question get at the cataphatic/apophatic?  For example, saying omnipresent instead of uncircumscribed? 

Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Uni Question
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2016, 04:35:02 PM »
So the course is assigning the "omnis" of God to Abraham and then asking which of these "omnis" a present-day theist should maintain?
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Niko92

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Re: Uni Question
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2016, 10:31:35 PM »
MilpanaGiwargis- I thought so and I believe your correct

Hinterlander- That was how I thought I would answer it in terms of cataphatic and apophatic but have decided against the question all up

Porter- Yes, I believe they have ascribed all the "omnis" onto the God of Abraham (Old Testament I'm assuming) and then asking which ones are important for a theist today.

Thanks for the time spent on helping guys but I guess I will choose another one that I may have more Orthodox resources on.


Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Uni Question
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2016, 10:46:16 PM »
MilpanaGiwargis- I thought so and I believe your correct

Hinterlander- That was how I thought I would answer it in terms of cataphatic and apophatic but have decided against the question all up

Porter- Yes, I believe they have ascribed all the "omnis" onto the God of Abraham (Old Testament I'm assuming) and then asking which ones are important for a theist today.

Thanks for the time spent on helping guys but I guess I will choose another one that I may have more Orthodox resources on.

Well most certainly there is an Orthodox view on what is important and necessary for proper theistic belief. That is the large part of what Orthodox religious thought is.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2016, 10:46:37 PM by Porter ODoran »
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Daedelus1138

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Re: Uni Question
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2016, 03:55:03 AM »
I appreciate the Orthodox answers on this issue.  I believe this is some congruence with Lutheranism as well.

Reformed Christians and those influenced by Anglo-Saxon religion have a habit of thinking of the "Omni's" of God without a healthy humility in the face of the limitations of human reasoning.  And of course this leads to all sorts of problems and questions about theodicy, divine sovereignty, and so forth... and potentially very far away from the Gospel of Jesus Christ (when we start thinking of God as an abstract, simple essence, a prime mover of "sovereignty").  There is an inherent conflict between "head and heart" in many cases that should not be there.

I'm not an expert on the Catholic side, though it does seem at least superficially to be similar to the Reformed, with non-dominant voices in the tradition appealing to the mystery of God.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2016, 04:00:57 AM by Daedelus1138 »