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Author Topic: I Miss the Divine Liturgy!  (Read 686 times) Average Rating: 0
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stavros_388
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« on: September 21, 2014, 11:55:55 AM »

So I have formally been practicing as a Catholic for about 2-3 months, and informally for a few months before that. It's practical. It's close. The services are short enough that my 3.5 yr old son (with ADHD and/or autism, we're quite sure) can attend with me without going bonkers. The Rosary is nice. The priest is a wonderful and good priest. Many of the parishioners, especially the older ones, are serious and devout.

But lately, I really miss:

The incense
The music
The solemnity
The melodies
The icons
The prostrations
The otherworldliness
And just about everything else about the Divine Liturgy.  Cry
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« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2014, 12:05:45 PM »

What's stopping you from attending?
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2014, 12:10:47 PM »

What's stopping you from attending?

There is only one small mission church about 1.5-2 hours away, with services held once a month or so (last winter, there were even fewer services due to inclement winter weather). One of these days I hope to make it there or elsewhere for the Divine Liturgy. I really miss my old Antiochian parish in Ontario sometimes. Alas...
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2014, 12:20:50 PM »

Perhaps you could ask your bishop whether there are any Greek Catholics in your area?
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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2014, 12:27:57 PM »

Perhaps you could ask your bishop whether there are any Greek Catholics in your area?

I have looked into it. I'm quite certain that the closest Eastern Catholic Church is even further away... about 3-3.5 hours one way.
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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2014, 01:04:31 PM »

Lord, have mercy!
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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2014, 01:28:01 PM »

So I have formally been practicing as a Catholic for about 2-3 months, and informally for a few months before that. It's practical. It's close. The services are short enough that my 3.5 yr old son (with ADHD and/or autism, we're quite sure) can attend with me without going bonkers. The Rosary is nice. The priest is a wonderful and good priest. Many of the parishioners, especially the older ones, are serious and devout.

But lately, I really miss:

The incense
The music
The solemnity
The melodies
The icons
The prostrations
The otherworldliness
And just about everything else about the Divine Liturgy.  Cry

I feel your pain, brother! Sad Sad  There's nothing like the Divine Liturgy!!  I know all too well that it's not the same, but you can "participate" (at least a little, anyway) in a Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy here.  You can watch it live or recorded.  Of course, unfortunately it doesn't fulfill your Sunday "obligation", unless for some reason you are unable to attend Mass, but it's better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick (which is how some folks think of the N.O. Mass).
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« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2014, 01:31:37 PM »

So I have formally been practicing as a Catholic for about 2-3 months, and informally for a few months before that. It's practical. It's close. The services are short enough that my 3.5 yr old son (with ADHD and/or autism, we're quite sure) can attend with me without going bonkers. The Rosary is nice. The priest is a wonderful and good priest. Many of the parishioners, especially the older ones, are serious and devout.

But lately, I really miss:

The incense
The music
The solemnity
The melodies
The icons
The prostrations
The otherworldliness
And just about everything else about the Divine Liturgy.  Cry

I feel your pain, brother! Sad Sad  There's nothing like the Divine Liturgy!!  I know all too well that it's not the same, but you can "participate" (at least a little, anyway) in a Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy here.  You can watch it live or recorded.  Of course, unfortunately it doesn't fulfill your Sunday "obligation", unless for some reason you are unable to attend Mass, but it's better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick (which is how some folks think of the N.O. Mass).

Thank you kindly for the link.
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« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2014, 02:54:35 PM »

So I have formally been practicing as a Catholic for about 2-3 months, and informally for a few months before that. It's practical. It's close. The services are short enough that my 3.5 yr old son (with ADHD and/or autism, we're quite sure) can attend with me without going bonkers. The Rosary is nice. The priest is a wonderful and good priest. Many of the parishioners, especially the older ones, are serious and devout.

But lately, I really miss:

The incense
The music
The solemnity
The melodies
The icons
The prostrations
The otherworldliness
And just about everything else about the Divine Liturgy.  Cry

I feel your pain, brother! Sad Sad  There's nothing like the Divine Liturgy!!  I know all too well that it's not the same, but you can "participate" (at least a little, anyway) in a Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy here.  You can watch it live or recorded.  Of course, unfortunately it doesn't fulfill your Sunday "obligation", unless for some reason you are unable to attend Mass, but it's better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick (which is how some folks think of the N.O. Mass).

Thank you kindly for the link.

My pleasure.  Smiley
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« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2014, 04:26:49 PM »

Dear Stavros,

Are you in New Zealand's Nelson Diocese?

I found about ten Orthodox churches, including Serbian, Greek, and Antiochian ones, in New Zealand on Google Maps, spread throughout its two islands.
https://www.google.com/maps/search/%22orthodox+church%22,+new+zealand/@-41.778569,171.6656524,5z

I also found a list of 25 Orthodox parishes in cities throughout New Zealand.
http://www.orthodox.org.nz/parishes.php

And besides the two Russian ones listed on the website, ROCOR's website lists five ROCOR ones:
Quote
Archangel Michael Community – Palmerston North
Christ the Savior Church – Wellington
Church of the Protection of the Mother of God – Le Bons Bay
Resurrection of Christ Church – Balmoral
St. Nicholas Church – Christchurch

http://www.rocor.org.au/?page_id=2

Have a look at those lists. Is there a church much closer to you on them?
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« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2014, 04:28:23 PM »

I live in the Canadian Rockies. Thanks, though!
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« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2014, 04:34:20 PM »

Stavros,

What is your zip code?
The Assembly of Bishops has a good directory:
http://www.assemblyofbishops.org/directories/parishes

The other thing is that you can still attend church a few times a year. There are people who drive 3 hours to "grandmother's house" for Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, and summer holidays. And there are people who go on pilgrimages several times a year and stay overnight at a monastery, hotel, or with friends and relatives.

Actually there are even people who commute three hours a day and another three back, but that's pretty rare and unadvised.

The second thing to do is have an icon corner in your house with a yearly pastoral blessing.
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« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2014, 04:42:52 PM »

Here's three:

All Saints of North America Monastery
Orthodox Church in America
37323 Hawkins-Pickle Rd
Dewdney, BC V0M 1H0

St. Elijah Serbian Orthodox Church
Serbian Orthodox Church
585 Gertsman Rd
Kelowna, BC V1X 4B3

St. Nicholas Mission Station
Orthodox Church in America
Kamloops, BC

St. Elijah's is located near the seat of the Nelson Diocese.
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« Reply #13 on: September 21, 2014, 04:49:27 PM »

I appreciate it, but I live in Fairmont Hot Springs, BC. Kelowna and Kamloops are about 6+ hours from me. My only real options are Cranbrook, BC (the mission parish I wrote about above) or Calgary, AB (3+ hours away by car). Trust me. I've looked into it!
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« Reply #14 on: September 21, 2014, 05:32:51 PM »

I heard that Banff is a pretty nice place to visit - my folks went there.

It says on Google that it's 1 hour 22 minutes from Fairmount Springs. Many people who live around New York, LA, and Moscow commute that long every day - not that it's nothing. But I think that once a month is OK. That's how often a lot of people attend church around the world, although more often would be better.

The point of having the mission parish is for folks like you who live far out in the mountains.
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« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2014, 05:52:58 PM »

I heard that Banff is a pretty nice place to visit - my folks went there.

It says on Google that it's 1 hour 22 minutes from Fairmount Springs. Many people who live around New York, LA, and Moscow commute that long every day - not that it's nothing. But I think that once a month is OK. That's how often a lot of people attend church around the world, although more often would be better.

The point of having the mission parish is for folks like you who live far out in the mountains.

I know. It's been tough. I have been able to bring my son to the Catholic Mass a few times, but with a non-Christian wife and Orthodox services so far away and held so infrequently... let's just say it's been complicated. Also it was hard because sometimes either myself or the priest couldn't make it out this past winter, which often meant I was trying to practice my faith alone for months at a time. I didn't do very well, suffice it to say.

And yes, I am about an hour and a half from Banff, which is very beautiful. The valley where I live is one of the most beautiful places I've ever been. You can see a bunch of photos I've taken of the area at this webpage, if you feel like it: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevenhorr/
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« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2014, 07:27:08 PM »

Thanks for the link. Don't forget that for centuries Christians have been living in the wilderness. It goes back to the prophets. More recently and closer to you there was St. Herman of Alaska.

There are lots of things you can do - make an icon corner, follow a daily prayer routine, make sure to visit the church, even by yourself, that one time a month. Read a few books about the life of St. Herman. It should strike a chord with you because he practically lived in the same region in the same kind of nature.
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« Reply #17 on: September 21, 2014, 07:27:47 PM »

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« Reply #18 on: September 21, 2014, 07:29:32 PM »

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« Reply #19 on: September 21, 2014, 07:44:09 PM »

On a sidenote- and this is not necessarily what you are looking for - there was a longstanding Russian pacifist Christian "Doukhobor" colony around Nelson.
http://www.doukhobor.org/Schaarschmidt-Maintenance-Revitalization.htm
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« Reply #20 on: September 21, 2014, 07:46:54 PM »

On a sidenote- and this is not necessarily what you are looking for - there was a longstanding Russian pacifist Christian "Doukhobor" colony around Nelson.
http://www.doukhobor.org/Schaarschmidt-Maintenance-Revitalization.htm

Interesting.  And thanks for the encouragement, rakovsky.
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« Reply #21 on: September 21, 2014, 07:47:39 PM »

On a sidenote- and this is not necessarily what you are looking for - there was a longstanding Russian pacifist Christian "Doukhobor" colony around Nelson.
http://www.doukhobor.org/Schaarschmidt-Maintenance-Revitalization.htm

What is the point of "recommending" a sect which is not only not Orthodox, but which rejects a priesthood, icons and liturgical ritual?  Tongue Roll Eyes
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« Reply #22 on: September 21, 2014, 07:57:42 PM »

On a sidenote- and this is not necessarily what you are looking for - there was a longstanding Russian pacifist Christian "Doukhobor" colony around Nelson.
http://www.doukhobor.org/Schaarschmidt-Maintenance-Revitalization.htm

What is the point of "recommending" a sect which is not only not Orthodox, but which rejects a priesthood, icons and liturgical ritual?  Tongue Roll Eyes
No, LBK I am not recommending it. The person feels so disonnected and alone in the wilderness from the world of eastern Christianity that he converted to Catholicism. Even though he is alone, there is a long line of prophets and saints who spent time in the wilderness, and you can find eastern Christian culture connected to British Columbia too and the Northwest, with saints like Herman of Alaska, Russian settlers from the Dukhobors, and Russian Imperial expansion focused on Alaska but that might have included British Columbia itself in the mid-19th century. In other words, the person does not have to feel alone and disconnected from the world of eastern Christianity when he is in the Rockies.
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« Reply #23 on: September 21, 2014, 08:01:00 PM »

The OP misses Orthodox worship. Suggesting a non-Orthodox sect to him, and one which rejects many fundamentals of Orthdoxy, is nothing but unproductive and a waste of time.
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« Reply #24 on: September 21, 2014, 08:06:02 PM »

The OP misses Orthodox worship. Suggesting a non-Orthodox sect to him, and one which rejects many fundamentals of Orthdoxy, is nothing but unproductive and a waste of time.
Then he will quickly realize that, without feeling that being in the Rockies he is totally isolated from any place eastern Christians have been before.
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« Reply #25 on: September 21, 2014, 08:16:31 PM »

Maybe he should invite a couple of monks to move in near him? Are there any monks (or people who are in contact with monasteries) on this thread? If it's remote enough, it sounds like the kind of place monks might like to live.
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« Reply #26 on: September 21, 2014, 08:22:13 PM »

Thanks for the link. Don't forget that for centuries Christians have been living in the wilderness. It goes back to the prophets. More recently and closer to you there was St. Herman of Alaska.

There are lots of things you can do - make an icon corner, follow a daily prayer routine, make sure to visit the church, even by yourself, that one time a month. Read a few books about the life of St. Herman. It should strike a chord with you because he practically lived in the same region in the same kind of nature.

To be fair I sympathize with the OP - not every person is called, much less able, to be a spiritual (if not literal) hermit. Especially when other real-world considerations are involved (e.g. the non-Christian wife - something I also share).

And Stavros, I completely understand. There is no way I could realistically afford to make a 3-hour trip to church and back, much less when other issues are considered. I remember struggling just to make an hour and a half to two hour trip to church. The distance, and irregularity in ability to attend services, really spiritually hurts. It becomes impossible to feel like one really "belongs" to the parish. Spiritual direction, and a good relationship with one's pastor, is hard. Spiritual practice itself becomes even harder when one is both physically and spiritually distant to church. I know people on here refer to people they know, or saints, etc. that could handle such hardships, but it's easier said than done and not everyone (or their circumstances) are the same.

By formally, does that mean you're officially a communing Catholic now? Did you officially convert or did they allow you to just start communing? Not judging here, just curious.
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« Reply #27 on: September 21, 2014, 08:34:24 PM »

The distance, and irregularity in ability to attend services, really spiritually hurts. It becomes impossible to feel like one really "belongs" to the parish. Spiritual direction, and a good relationship with one's pastor, is hard. Spiritual practice itself becomes even harder when one is both physically and spiritually distant to church. I know people on here refer to people they know, or saints, etc. that could handle such hardships, but it's easier said than done and not everyone (or their circumstances) are the same.
OK, you are not wrong. A weekly church life works better. But it's not totally unmanageable. It's a challenge.

Folks in the USSR rarely went to church, and many yet were spiritual or faithful in their lives. One family who came from "No Religion Country" and stayed in our town sent their daughter Catholic school and only went twice in two years to the Orthodox Church that I now attend, because it is quite a distance in the mountains. Yet when their relative passed away here, it was arch-important for them to have the proper 40-day Orthodox family memorial, which I didn't even know about at the time, being Protestant.

My point about that family is that even though they practically were disconnected from church life and weren't really raised in the church, their Orthodox identity was strongly part of them. For them to have attended church even once a month would have been frequent. And like I mentioned, many people regularly attend their church only once a month, although weekly would be better.
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« Reply #28 on: September 21, 2014, 08:42:30 PM »

OK, you are not wrong. A weekly church life works better. But it's not totally unmanageable. It's a challenge.

Folks in the USSR rarely went to church, and many yet were spiritual or faithful in their lives. One family who came from "No Religion Country" and stayed in our town sent their daughter Catholic school and only went twice in two years to the Orthodox Church that I now attend, because it is quite a distance in the mountains. Yet when their relative passed away here, it was arch-important for them to have the proper 40-day Orthodox family memorial, which I didn't even know about at the time, being Protestant.

My point about that family is that even though they practically were disconnected from church life and weren't really raised in the church, their Orthodox identity was strongly part of them. For them to have attended church even once a month would have been frequent. And like I mentioned, many people regularly attend their church only once a month, although weekly would be better.

At least in situations like those they are Orthodox families, not Orthodox individuals. It would no doubt be much easier to be Orthodox in a group, even without an immediately available parish, than to be Orthodox alone with a non-Orthodox family.

But your point is well-taken. Some people have the spiritual strength to overcome such obstacles. Others don't, however. I would likely find myself in the latter category if I were in a similar situation to the OP.
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« Reply #29 on: September 21, 2014, 09:23:31 PM »

Part of it might be societal mentality, Nephi. In the US, frequent church attendance is still considered "standard" or "proper" especially if you have been raised in a family that does this. Granted, in the US attendance has been declining significantly.

But in Eastern Orthodox countries (and maybe Greece or the Middle East), the cultural "standard" means going to church once a month, even though our faith would have us go weekly. So if you were raised in that environment, you might think that going to church monthly was normal. I don't think it really has to matter whether the person grew up Orthodox, so much as what the person's and society's own expectations area.

If he is in an environment where there are lots of church people and he is used to being in such an environment, then Yes, it can be tough. But the answer is to learn about the tradition of hermitage in Orthodoxy and to make sure that he attends when those monthly services are available. I commute over a half hour to church, and we have church council members who drive an hour. I used to commute 45 minutes to work. Again, I am not saying that it's preferable, but that it's manageable.
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« Reply #30 on: September 21, 2014, 09:34:56 PM »

The other thing is that I liked the flickr photos. They had a neat international feel, with photos of Asian dancing. My guess is that living in the mountains, Divine Liturgy might not be the only thing you are missing. You simply may have a desire to be in an urban cultural environment like Calgary a few times a year. You can schedule that to coincide with divine liturgies or Vespers, which can sometimes be during the week. My folks drive 8-12 hours in their car once a month to the South, where they stay for relaxation.
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« Reply #31 on: September 21, 2014, 09:39:07 PM »

Nephi and rakovsky, I appreciate both of your perspectives and input, honestly.

Nephi, thanks for your words of understanding. You are correct in saying that it would be easier to practice Orthodoxy with others, or even AN other. But alas, that is not my situation. I also have a child that I don't want to leave to a purely secular upbringing. As he gets older, I would like to try to take him to an Orthodox service. And to answer your question, I felt like my conversion to Catholicism was more of a 'transition', really (which makes more sense from a Catholic perspective, I think). I said the Apostle's Creed before a small group of parishioners during a weekday Mass, and began communing that day. Technically, I suppose I converted, but I still pray the Jesus Prayer and say the daily prayers from my Orthodox prayer book. The ordinary form of Mass is simply no substitute for the Divine Liturgy, though. But attending and worshiping at the Catholic parish has kept my faith afloat, so to speak, and has at least given me the regularity of sacraments and fellowship that I simply couldn't have within Orthodoxy in my present circumstances.

rakovsky, I appreciate what you say, and you've reminded me of a lot of the reasons I sought Orthodoxy in the first place. The Catholic Church is comfortable in a way that Orthodoxy rarely was for me, but I sometimes wonder if it's a spiritually beneficial kind of 'comfortable' or not. I've started to sense that some of the differences between the Roman Catholic (excluding eastern rite, which I have no experience with) and Orthodox Churches aren't as superficial as I had thought. But at least there I can hear the Gospel read, and participate in the Eucharist. Like Nephi, I am not really cut out for the life of a hermit, even though there was a time that I truly thought I was! Perhaps as time goes on, things will change. You have given me some good for food for thought; I'll say that.
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« Reply #32 on: September 21, 2014, 09:41:41 PM »

The other thing is that I liked the flickr photos. They had a neat international feel, with photos of Asian dancing. My guess is that living in the mountains, Divine Liturgy might not be the only thing you are missing. You simply may have a desire to be in an urban cultural environment like Calgary a few times a year. You can schedule that to coincide with divine liturgies or Vespers, which can sometimes be during the week.

We do go to Calgary for an urban fix at least a couple times a year, and occasionally miss some of the amenities of the city. That's a good idea (one that I've entertained but have just never put into action). And thank you regarding the photos.  Smiley
« Last Edit: September 21, 2014, 09:55:09 PM by stavros_388 » Logged

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« Reply #33 on: September 21, 2014, 10:18:58 PM »

rakovsky, I appreciate what you say, and you've reminded me of a lot of the reasons I sought Orthodoxy in the first place. The Catholic Church is comfortable in a way that Orthodoxy rarely was for me, but I sometimes wonder if it's a spiritually beneficial kind of 'comfortable' or not. I've started to sense that some of the differences between the Roman Catholic (excluding eastern rite, which I have no experience with) and Orthodox Churches aren't as superficial as I had thought. But at least there I can hear the Gospel read, and participate in the Eucharist. Like Nephi, I am not really cut out for the life of a hermit, even though there was a time that I truly thought I was! Perhaps as time goes on, things will change. You have given me some good for food for thought; I'll say that.
I don't really see an unmanageable problem. Your motivation is that you want to be part of a Christian community, and you like the Divine Liturgy and Eastern theology and life.

You can be part of a mission parish and go once a month when they have services, which is how often most Americans on average attend. On top of that, you can go to Calgary once a month for cultural events, and go to a Sunday or weekday day liturgy or Vespers when you are there.

On top of that, you can visit Catholic services and participate in their events and community without being Catholic. I went to Catholic school, was born in a Catholic Hospital, was active in the Catholic ministry on campus all without being Catholic. On top of that, Orthodox life involves things like reading about saints and a prayer life, which are outside of church services.

It sounds like what happened is that you moved from Ontario where there was a wonderful Antiochian parish to a beautiful place in nature, the kind where our major saints have lived, and you can go to Orthodox churches almost half the time with a "New York" style commute and participate in Catholic or Protestant activities the rest of the time.
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« Reply #34 on: September 22, 2014, 01:14:22 AM »

On a sidenote- and this is not necessarily what you are looking for - there was a longstanding Russian pacifist Christian "Doukhobor" colony around Nelson.
http://www.doukhobor.org/Schaarschmidt-Maintenance-Revitalization.htm


laughs...you might as well also recommend he try and become a Hutterite....they leave in AB too..Wink


Even if they WERE not even close to the Church in belief, I would also suggest that they wouldn't particular be all that inclined to have random outsiders 'join up'


(Please note, I would 100% use the big H word with the Dukhobors as I would with my own related tradition...this is not my being mean or horrible...but its truth)


oh a very unrelated note, my great-great-great-great grandfather merits an ENTIRE page on the dukhobor website that you referenced...so I do actually know a -bit- about what i speak of.... for reference   http://www.doukhobor.org/Samarin.htm
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« Reply #35 on: September 22, 2014, 01:20:48 AM »


Even if they WERE not even close to the Church in belief, I would also suggest that they wouldn't particular be all that inclined to have random outsiders 'join up'


Precisely. Which makes the suggestion of such groups as an answer to the OP even less suitable.
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« Reply #36 on: September 22, 2014, 01:29:39 AM »

Apparently, there was another group that grew out of the Molokans and Doukhobors, combining aspects of both with the added idea of a restored "prophethood" and, in many cases, polygamy. It wasn't long before they were called by their neighbors...you guessed it...Mormons!

http://scottcorner.org/russianmormons/
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« Reply #37 on: September 22, 2014, 01:42:16 AM »

Oh there are a million things like that.   Russia was an interesting place at that point in history.


But...back to the actual issue.

None of these groups are even as -close- as the RC church Stavros is currently participating in.....so not that I am recommending he stick with that etc.....but it is at least not nearly as far from the mark as making random suggestions from the Jeopardy Category.


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« Reply #38 on: September 22, 2014, 01:48:11 AM »

To expand on my idea from earlier, what's your (Stavros') financial situation like?

The reason why I ask is because if you have the money, you could set up a few of these near where you live. They're relatively inexpensive (at least some models are, notably the tipis) and could potentially make good dwellings for monks. "If you build it, they will come".

You'd want to make sure beforehand that there are monks who'd be interested in such an arrangement. If it's anything like Alaska, it does seem like the ideal sort of setting for a monastery, especially a small one of the skete type. If one of them was a hieromonk, then you could attend Divine Liturgy again without needing a long commute.

Alternatively, if you don't have the money yourself, perhaps someone else might be willing and able to chip in.

Just an idea. I'm good at coming up with those. My ideas aren't always the most practical ones though....
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« Reply #39 on: September 22, 2014, 02:40:17 AM »

Even if they WERE not even close to the Church in belief, I would also suggest that they wouldn't particular be all that inclined to have random outsiders 'join up'
Precisely. Which makes the suggestion of such groups as an answer to the OP even less suitable.
To summarize:
Things even vaguely related to Eastern Christians where he is located:
Calgary churches: Awesome, but 3 hours' drive.
St. Herman of Alaska: Awesome saint he can read about for his spirituality, but located in Alaska.
Russian imperial involvement in British Columbia: An interesting historical study
St Elijah Church: Good, but only meets once a month and is still a NYC-style commute.
Dukhobors: Interesting and related to Eastern Christianity and Russia in general, and located in his region, but they are pacifist style heretics, from the Orthodox POV.
Catholic or Traditional Protestant Churches: It's Christian and close, but it's not Eastern or Orthodox.

Did I miss anything?
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« Reply #40 on: September 23, 2014, 11:35:18 AM »

Even if they WERE not even close to the Church in belief, I would also suggest that they wouldn't particular be all that inclined to have random outsiders 'join up'
Precisely. Which makes the suggestion of such groups as an answer to the OP even less suitable.
To summarize:
Things even vaguely related to Eastern Christians where he is located:
Calgary churches: Awesome, but 3 hours' drive.
St. Herman of Alaska: Awesome saint he can read about for his spirituality, but located in Alaska.
Russian imperial involvement in British Columbia: An interesting historical study
St Elijah Church: Good, but only meets once a month and is still a NYC-style commute.
Dukhobors: Interesting and related to Eastern Christianity and Russia in general, and located in his region, but they are pacifist style heretics, from the Orthodox POV.
Catholic or Traditional Protestant Churches: It's Christian and close, but it's not Eastern or Orthodox.

Did I miss anything?


Just that Eastern Catholicism (e.g. Byzantine-Ruthenian, etc.) is not only Christian but fully Eastern and fully orthodox!!  

Stavros can do much of what has been suggested: icon corner, prayer rule, reading of Scripture, saints, and patristic literature, watching live broadcasts of the Divine Liturgy (ByzCath link previously provided, and I'm sure there are Orthodox links also), etc., while still remaining Catholic and receiving the Sacraments, albeit at a Novus Ordo parish (but valid Sacraments nonetheless).

EDIT:  Stavros, you might also want to check out this parish.  Maybe contact the pastor and seek some advice and guidance.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2014, 11:38:59 AM by J Michael » Logged

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« Reply #41 on: September 23, 2014, 10:56:17 PM »

Even if they WERE not even close to the Church in belief, I would also suggest that they wouldn't particular be all that inclined to have random outsiders 'join up'
Precisely. Which makes the suggestion of such groups as an answer to the OP even less suitable.
To summarize:
Things even vaguely related to Eastern Christians where he is located:
Calgary churches: Awesome, but 3 hours' drive.
St. Herman of Alaska: Awesome saint he can read about for his spirituality, but located in Alaska.
Russian imperial involvement in British Columbia: An interesting historical study
St Elijah Church: Good, but only meets once a month and is still a NYC-style commute.
Dukhobors: Interesting and related to Eastern Christianity and Russia in general, and located in his region, but they are pacifist style heretics, from the Orthodox POV.
Catholic or Traditional Protestant Churches: It's Christian and close, but it's not Eastern or Orthodox.

Did I miss anything?


Just that Eastern Catholicism (e.g. Byzantine-Ruthenian, etc.) is not only Christian but fully Eastern and fully orthodox!!  

Stavros can do much of what has been suggested: icon corner, prayer rule, reading of Scripture, saints, and patristic literature, watching live broadcasts of the Divine Liturgy (ByzCath link previously provided, and I'm sure there are Orthodox links also), etc., while still remaining Catholic and receiving the Sacraments, albeit at a Novus Ordo parish (but valid Sacraments nonetheless).

EDIT:  Stavros, you might also want to check out this parish.  Maybe contact the pastor and seek some advice and guidance.

Thanks to you again, J Michael! I am trying to do roughly this.
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