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Author Topic: judaism closest match after Christianity  (Read 954 times) Average Rating: 0
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wgw
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« Reply #45 on: January 20, 2015, 02:29:02 AM »


Have you ever wondered about maybe the Jews where right, I'm just curious.
Lately this idea has for reasons beyond me plagued me a bit.
I've always said that I'm an believer in God and that if I ever for some reason fall away from Christianity I will most likely seek to become jewish as to me it's either the Gospel or abide the law.

I believe in Christ, but there are certain aspects of Christianity which I find problematic to some sense.
How we're shattered into billions of different sects and denominations doesn't help showing the Glory of God either.

The Jewish view on God as something we humans cannot explain accurately with words and how God is a mystery to us is compelling to me I admit.
The we have it all figured out attitude among us christians isn't helping either.

I don't know, I guess I'm just curious if this ideas have ever struck others at OC.NET ad well?




Pax Christi
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You know the Orthodox Christians believe God in His essence to be incomprehensible, and like your conception of Mewish doctrine, something words cannot define (acrually some Kabbalistic doctrines are rather different and postulate elaborately detailed conceptions of God).  So if you find the idea of a God unknowable in His essence but knowable in His energies you might want to seriously consider becoming Orthodox.  Our doctrine on this point differs fairly dramatically from the Scholastic dogma of Absolute Divine Simplicity, and is based on the work of St. Gregory of Palamas in summarizing the wisdom of the Heaychasts on Mount Athos.
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Someone once asked William Inge KCVO, the Dean of St. Paul's in London from 1911-1934, if he was an enthusiast of the study of the liturgy, and he replied, “No. Nor do I collect postage stamps.”
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« Reply #46 on: January 20, 2015, 03:10:30 AM »


Have you ever wondered about maybe the Jews where right, I'm just curious.
Lately this idea has for reasons beyond me plagued me a bit.
I've always said that I'm an believer in God and that if I ever for some reason fall away from Christianity I will most likely seek to become jewish as to me it's either the Gospel or abide the law.

I believe in Christ, but there are certain aspects of Christianity which I find problematic to some sense.
How we're shattered into billions of different sects and denominations doesn't help showing the Glory of God either.

The Jewish view on God as something we humans cannot explain accurately with words and how God is a mystery to us is compelling to me I admit.
The we have it all figured out attitude among us christians isn't helping either.

I don't know, I guess I'm just curious if this ideas have ever struck others at OC.NET ad well?




Pax Christi
MC

You know the Orthodox Christians believe God in His essence to be incomprehensible, and like your conception of Mewish doctrine, something words cannot define (acrually some Kabbalistic doctrines are rather different and postulate elaborately detailed conceptions of God).  So if you find the idea of a God unknowable in His essence but knowable in His energies you might want to seriously consider becoming Orthodox.  Our doctrine on this point differs fairly dramatically from the Scholastic dogma of Absolute Divine Simplicity, and is based on the work of St. Gregory of Palamas in summarizing the wisdom of the Heaychasts on Mount Athos.

No one hath seen God at any time; the Only-begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, He hath declared Him (John 1:18). The Deity, therefore, is ineffable and incomprehensible. For no one knoweth the Father, save the Son, nor the Son, save the Father (Matt. 11:27). And the Holy Spirit, too, so knows the things of God as the spirit of the man knows the things that are in him (1 Cor. 2:11). Moreover, after the first and blessed nature no one, not of men only, but even of supramundane powers, and the Cherubim, I say, and Seraphim themselves, has ever known God, save he to whom He revealed Himself.

God, however, did not leave us in absolute ignorance. For the knowledge of God’s existence has been implanted by Him in all by nature. This creation, too, and its maintenance, and its government, proclaim the majesty of the Divine nature (Wisd. 13:5). Moreover, by the Law and the Prophets in former times, and afterwards by His Only-begotten Son, our Lord and God and Saviour Jesus Christ, He disclosed to us the knowledge of Himself as that was possible for us.

All things, therefore, that have been delivered to us by Law and Prophets and Apostles and Evangelists we receive, and know, and honour, seeking for nothing beyond these. For God, being good, is the cause of all good, subject neither to envy nor to any passion. For envy is far removed from the Divine nature, which is both passionless and only good.

As knowing all things, therefore, and providing for what is profitable for each, He revealed that which it was to our profit to know; but what we were unable to bear He kept secret. With these things let us be satisfied, and let us abide by them, not removing everlasting boundaries, nor overpassing the divine tradition (Prov. 22:28).

St. John Damascene (c.675-749): De Fide Orthodoxa 1,1.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2015, 03:11:20 AM by xOrthodox4Christx » Logged

"We knew not whether we were in Heaven or on Earth… We only know that God dwells there among the people, and their service is fairer than the ceremonies of other nations." (St. Vladimir of Kiev)
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« Reply #47 on: January 20, 2015, 03:18:04 AM »

Thanks, XO4,
IIRC some  of the "Dead Sea Scrolls" were/are from Isaiah, which is a seminal source of that 'tradition' you mentioned.
When I listen to folks often I hear they wish someone to come along and either "fix it" or take responsibility to get them out of the "mess" they're in, which is a kind of Messiah, someone who can come and take care of them/it, etc. thus some are still as children, awaiting! The Jewish tradition captured and codified it well.
There was a political angle in it though. As I understand Palm Sunday signified a return to the Maccabeian reign which overthrew their Greek overlords and briefly freed them until Rome came along, subjugating all. The Palms were the symbol of the Macabean Kingdom, victory and freedom. Point is by the time He came they wanted a Davidian King-General-Statesman. So that Messiah notion is not to modern.

What the Qumran scrolls reveal is that, Jewish tradition expected that there were supposed to be two "Messiahs" one that was spiritual and one that was political.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2015, 03:18:28 AM by xOrthodox4Christx » Logged

"We knew not whether we were in Heaven or on Earth… We only know that God dwells there among the people, and their service is fairer than the ceremonies of other nations." (St. Vladimir of Kiev)
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« Reply #48 on: January 20, 2015, 08:26:42 AM »

Thanks, XO4,
IIRC some  of the "Dead Sea Scrolls" were/are from Isaiah, which is a seminal source of that 'tradition' you mentioned.
When I listen to folks often I hear they wish someone to come along and either "fix it" or take responsibility to get them out of the "mess" they're in, which is a kind of Messiah, someone who can come and take care of them/it, etc. thus some are still as children, awaiting! The Jewish tradition captured and codified it well.
There was a political angle in it though. As I understand Palm Sunday signified a return to the Maccabeian reign which overthrew their Greek overlords and briefly freed them until Rome came along, subjugating all. The Palms were the symbol of the Macabean Kingdom, victory and freedom. Point is by the time He came they wanted a Davidian King-General-Statesman. So that Messiah notion is not to modern.

What the Qumran scrolls reveal is that, Jewish tradition expected that there were supposed to be two "Messiahs" one that was spiritual and one that was political.

That's new to me. Thanks.
Like their sacrifices too, one took the sins of the people into the desert, the other offered to God.
Of course we have Judas Iscariot and Him too.
Yeah, always loved symmetry.
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« Reply #49 on: January 20, 2015, 10:37:25 AM »

your conception of Mewish doctrine

I thought biro was the only Mewish believer on these boards.

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