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Author Topic: I am in need of some guidance  (Read 578 times) Average Rating: 0
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Dolly
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« on: October 22, 2012, 01:17:35 PM »

Hello All, I am so grateful to be here in this forum.  After reading and lurking here for a long time, I see so much love and help freely offered and am amazed by the spirit I find here.

I come here today because I am actually overwhelmed and need some guidance. In fact, I am so overwhelmed that I am not exactly sure where to begin.  Let me start by saying that my parent's had me baptized a Lutheran when I was 5 years old but they never took me to church.  Then in college I converted to Catholicism.  This happened because I wanted to be closer to God and because my boyfriend's family always took me to mass with them.  My family had fallen apart and I was definitely looking for stability.  I didn't even know there was an Orthodox church at the time.  I've since gotten married and my husband (who grew up protestant) have grown together in Christ and are looking for a church to really call home.

He has been going to Mass with me but neither one of us quite feel right there.  We both went to an Orthodox service once and he was upset by it because the people at the church gossiped during the service.  We also went to a local Greek Orthodox Church and spoke to the priest there.  He was absolutely amazing and explained to us that the gossiping during the service was wrong and not normal.  That made my husband feel better.  He is still struggling with feeling like an outsider due to the ethnic part of Orthodoxy but he is willing to work through it.  We have been studying and praying on this issue for years now. On Saturday I attended a lecture at the Catholic church on Marian theology and it had a profound effect on me.  It made me feel like I need to seriously devote my life to God but in a church were apparitions were not more important than Jesus (I hope that makes sense, I am not being critical.  Just telling you what is in my heart).

So, here are my questions for anyone willing to try to answer them:
-we have three Orthodox churches near our home: Russian Orthodox, Pan Orthodox, and Greek Orthodox. Which one would you try attending first?

-When you go to an Orthodox church for the first time is there anything special we should do or not do?

-I suffer from Celiac Disease.  Does anyone else out there also have this condition (or someone they love) and know how this effects taking communion (I know this is not the proper term in Orthodoxy but I am not sure of it)? 

-Can someone explain how fasting works?  This is a concern to me due to my disease and my husband isn't sure he can do it.

-How do the woman dress at church?  Is it OK to wear dress pants? (I know that sounds stupid but my church people wear shorts and sweat pants) Also, are woman suppose to cover their heads?

-Am I missing any questions that you think I should be asking?

-Can anyone give me any advice on starting this process?

Thank you so much.  I realize this is a long and somewhat rambling post.  I just feel that we need to get serious about this and take proper steps. Thank you all and God bless!!!!
 
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Marc1152
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« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2012, 01:38:14 PM »

I am generally interested in Nutrition and of late the effects of Wheat eating since I read the book "Wheat Belly". I will post a link to a short lecture by the author.

The theory is that everyone has a bad reaction to wheat. Celiac disease is just a more exaggerated reaction.
One big reason is that the wheat we eat today has been genetically modified and the plant has been hybridized so many times to meet modern needs as to virtually be a different plant than what it was. It is much shorter and the grain is more abundant and closer to the stalk which has been modified to be thicker ( to withstand wind better).

But every time the plant has been modified no one has asked the question whether or not it was still fit for human consumption.

I dont know if the very small amount of bread in the Eucharist will give you a reaction so consult your allergist. But one solution is to purchase Ancient Wheat (which is the same as what was used in Biblical Times in any event, so that is cool) and ask if whomever makes the Prosphora will use the flour made from it. They may be open to doing you this favor and if your Parish consumes Antidorn ( the left over bread) you will be doing all of them a small health favor.

It can be purchased on line. Read Wheat Belly.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrYg22BU9oU
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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2012, 01:40:52 PM »

So, here are my questions for anyone willing to try to answer them:
-we have three Orthodox churches near our home: Russian Orthodox, Pan Orthodox, and Greek Orthodox. Which one would you try attending first?

Call each and find out if the services is mostly in English (this helps a lot)

-When you go to an Orthodox church for the first time is there anything special we should do or not do?

This might help http://www.frederica.com/12-things/ and also http://ancientfaith.com/podcasts/eastwest/10_things_i_wish_i_knew

-I suffer from Celiac Disease.  Does anyone else out there also have this condition (or someone they love) and know how this effects taking communion (I know this is not the proper term in Orthodoxy but I am not sure of it)?  

Talk to the Priest it can be worked out.
 See above^

-Can someone explain how fasting works?  This is a concern to me due to my disease and my husband isn't sure he can do it.

This is also something that is determined between you and your Priest.  There are rules but they need to be applied to your situation. It needs to be accomplished in stages.


-How do the woman dress at church?  Is it OK to wear dress pants? (I know that sounds stupid but my church people wear shorts and sweat pants) Also, are woman suppose to cover their heads?

In some parishes head covering are used but not all.  Dress nice as you would if you were honoring someone, however we meet Christ as we are.


-Am I missing any questions that you think I should be asking?

Go slow and make sure you finds and talk to a Priest you can be comfortable with.


-Can anyone give me any advice on starting this process?

Thank you so much.  I realize this is a long and somewhat rambling post.  I just feel that we need to get serious about this and take proper steps. Thank you all and God bless!!!!
 
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 01:45:30 PM by soderquj » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2012, 01:41:13 PM »

So, here are my questions for anyone willing to try to answer them:
-we have three Orthodox churches near our home: Russian Orthodox, Pan Orthodox, and Greek Orthodox. Which one would you try attending first?

Have you checked their websites?  Maybe get a feel what the church is like.  I'd go to one that has English services.  By Pan Orthodox, do you mean OCA?

-When you go to an Orthodox church for the first time is there anything special we should do or not do?

Introduce yourself to the priest if you can.

-I suffer from Celiac Disease.  Does anyone else out there also have this condition (or someone they love) and know how this effects taking communion (I know this is not the proper term in Orthodoxy but I am not sure of it)? 

You can speak to the priest about it and I believe he can give you Communion with just the Precious Blood of Christ.  But given you are not Orthodox yet, don't worry about this now, but it is a good question to ask the priest during your inquiry.

-Can someone explain how fasting works?  This is a concern to me due to my disease and my husband isn't sure he can do it.

The best person to speak again is your priest.  Unlike Western Christianity where it is mandated by law, in Orthodoxy there is a prescription and the priest will apply it to you.  When the time for fasting comes, the priest will help you come up with your fasting "regime", if you want to call it that, based on your limits and abilities and spiritual needs.

-How do the woman dress at church?  Is it OK to wear dress pants? (I know that sounds stupid but my church people wear shorts and sweat pants) Also, are woman suppose to cover their heads?

In the parish I visit some women cover their heads, some do not.  It is up to the individual.  Even how women dress are different.  Just keep in mind, you'll be standing most of the time and you may have to sit on the floor so wearing a short skirt is a no-no in many ways.

-Am I missing any questions that you think I should be asking?

Can't think of anything, just go and attend.  If you don't know what to do, then just remain in one corner.  That is okay.  You don't have to join in anything at the beginning until you know what is going on.  It is perfectly fine.  If people go up to reverence the book of Gospels, you don't have to join that.  During Communion though some people do bring antidoron to guests (happened to me).  Since you are celiac you wouldn't be able to eat that, but take it anyway (its a nice, Christian gesture) and maybe give it to your husband.

-Can anyone give me any advice on starting this process?

Check out the start time of Liturgy, and be there.  Walk in the door.  That is it!  If you try to come in early you may get a chance to speak with the priest prior to Liturgy.  Or stay a bit after and see if you can speak with the priest after.
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« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2012, 01:42:48 PM »

I am generally interested in Nutrition and of late the effects of Wheat eating since I read the book "Wheat Belly". I will post a link to a short lecture by the author.

The theory is that everyone has a bad reaction to wheat. Celiac disease is just a more exaggerated reaction.
One big reason is that the wheat we eat today has been genetically modified and the plant has been hybridized so many times to meet modern needs as to virtually be a different plant than what it was. It is much shorter and the grain is more abundant and closer to the stalk which has been modified to be thicker ( to withstand wind better).

But every time the plant has been modified no one has asked the question whether or not it was still fit for human consumption.

I dont know if the very small amount of bread in the Eucharist will give you a reaction so consult your allergist. But one solution is to purchase Ancient Wheat (which is the same as what was used in Biblical Times in any event, so that is cool) and ask if whomever makes the Prosphora will use the flour made from it. They may be open to doing you this favor and if your Parish consumes Antidorn ( the left over bread) you will be doing all of them a small health favor.

It can be purchased on line. Read Wheat Belly.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrYg22BU9oU

Interesting.  I am a prosphora maker.  Where do I find this ancient wheat?
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Marc1152
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« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2012, 01:47:48 PM »

I am generally interested in Nutrition and of late the effects of Wheat eating since I read the book "Wheat Belly". I will post a link to a short lecture by the author.

The theory is that everyone has a bad reaction to wheat. Celiac disease is just a more exaggerated reaction.
One big reason is that the wheat we eat today has been genetically modified and the plant has been hybridized so many times to meet modern needs as to virtually be a different plant than what it was. It is much shorter and the grain is more abundant and closer to the stalk which has been modified to be thicker ( to withstand wind better).

But every time the plant has been modified no one has asked the question whether or not it was still fit for human consumption.

I dont know if the very small amount of bread in the Eucharist will give you a reaction so consult your allergist. But one solution is to purchase Ancient Wheat (which is the same as what was used in Biblical Times in any event, so that is cool) and ask if whomever makes the Prosphora will use the flour made from it. They may be open to doing you this favor and if your Parish consumes Antidorn ( the left over bread) you will be doing all of them a small health favor.

It can be purchased on line. Read Wheat Belly.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrYg22BU9oU

Interesting.  I am a prosphora maker.  Where do I find this ancient wheat?

here is a link..Google around, there are more

http://www.einkorn.com/baking-einkorn-bread/

And this is about Celiac disease

http://www.einkorn.com/did-wheat-hybridization-lead-to-celiac-disease/
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 01:49:39 PM by Marc1152 » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2012, 01:56:58 PM »

Again, I am so very grateful to all of you.  I am always overwhelmed with the kindness and warmth in this forum!  Thank you all so much for reading and responding to my many questions.  I have read all of your answers and they have helped so much!!!  All of it makes so much sense.  I feel a lot less overwhelmed now.  Especially understanding that Orthodoxy isn't a set of unflinching laws.  Knowing that you can go to a priest and talk through things is wonderful.  Not something I have encountered since college.  Please pray for us that we can find our way through this process.  Thank you!!!!

To Marc1152-I really appreciate that you took the time to respond especially since you have taken the time to read Wheat Belly.  I have been aware of the book for a long time.  I have not read it since I have already read most of the books on the topic (especially on the topic of the paleo diet).  I am not certain how "Wheat Belly" portrayed Celiac Disease but it isn't an allergy.  It is a genetic condition (one of the ways to diagnosis it is to take a genetic test).  Even ancient wheat, totally unmodified, will harm me.  I am only telling you this so you understand that it is not an allergy. Many people think that it is for some reason.  But, thank you for your time and understanding.  I very much appreciate your response!!
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« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2012, 01:59:06 PM »

Quote
-we have three Orthodox churches near our home: Russian Orthodox, Pan Orthodox, and Greek Orthodox. Which one would you try attending first?
I would be concerned about the “Pan-orthodox” one. What does that mean? The Orthodox Church is a kind of confederation of national churches, wherein the Church of Constantinople has some special honors and minor prerrogatives as “president” of the “confederation”.

What I mean is, every canonical Orthodox Church you meet will belong to one of the traditional jurisdictions. Many do receive people from every ethnicity, some parishes are more multicultural than others, nevertheless, institutionally, they belong to one national jurisdiction only. So, I am not sure what a “pan-Orthodox” parish can mean.

The best way to avoid fake-orthodox churches is to get to know which bishop they are under. The only canonical presiding bishops in the US are the ones listed here: http://www.assemblyofbishops.org/directories/bishops

If the parish is not under one of these, it may be Christian, it may be good-intentioned, but it is not really Orthodox.

As for the Russian and Greek parishes, I would say for you two to go to the one you feel more comfortable at. Church life is community life. Which community do you want to be part of?


Quote
-When you go to an Orthodox church for the first time is there anything special we should do or not do?
I recommend this article: “12 Things I Wish I’d Known in a First Visit to an Orthodox Church” - http://www.frederica.com/12-things/

Quote
-I suffer from Celiac Disease.  Does anyone else out there also have this condition (or someone they love) and know how this effects taking communion (I know this is not the proper term in Orthodoxy but I am not sure of it)?  

I can’t advice on that, maybe other forumites have faced this situation. This may be a good reference to know where to go. Where would they be able to provide gluten-free bread in the Eucharist? I know there is an association of Orthodox Church doctors, though I can’t find the link right now. Maybe they could help if you emailed them. I’ll try to find it.

Quote
-Can someone explain how fasting works?  This is a concern to me due to my disease and my husband isn't sure he can do it.
Fasting is an exercise of our hearts and will. It is not self-immolation. If anyone has a medical condition that prevents from fasting, then the person should not do it.
I would suggest you take fasting rules to your doctor and ask him how far you can go into that. If he says that you can’t at all, well, then you can’t.
Remember that fasting of food is just an exercise for the real fasting of the mind, that is, not “eating” bad thoughts, not allowing sinful ideas to develop in our hearts, not to look at people and things sinfully.
With food, we first smell it, but it doesn’t mean we eat it. Likewise with thoughts. The thought itself can come to our mind, but if we do not cultivate it or act on it, then it is not a sin. Food fasting is an exercise for that, so, even if you can’t exercise, you still will be able to truly fast in heart.

Quote
-How do the woman dress at church?  Is it OK to wear dress pants? (I know that sounds stupid but my church people wear shorts and sweat pants) Also, are woman suppose to cover their heads?

Like men, with modesty. The details depend pretty much on local culture and parish policies.

Quote
-Am I missing any questions that you think I should be asking?
Hmmm… if I think of any I get back to you. Smiley

Quote
-Can anyone give me any advice on starting this process?
Go in prayer and in the Holy Spirit with faith and love. That’s all that you need for now really. Smiley
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Dolly
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« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2012, 02:08:59 PM »

Fabio Leite (or anyone else who would like to help me), so does this church count as a real orthodox church?  Sorry, you have confused me.

http://www.htoca.org/htoca/Welcome.html


(just a little side note:  I will be running out to my volunteer work in a few minutes.  So, thanks to anyone else who posts and I will respond tonight when I return home.)
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 02:10:59 PM by Dolly » Logged
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« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2012, 02:28:00 PM »

Fabio Leite (or anyone else who would like to help me), so does this church count as a real orthodox church?  Sorry, you have confused me.

http://www.htoca.org/htoca/Welcome.html


(just a little side note:  I will be running out to my volunteer work in a few minutes.  So, thanks to anyone else who posts and I will respond tonight when I return home.)

I checked it out and they are under the OCA http://oca.org/parishes/state/PA
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« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2012, 02:29:32 PM »

Yes, it is.

You can see it at the directory of the Assembly of Bishops:
http://www.assemblyofbishops.org/directories/parishes?parish=holy+trinity&clergy=&city=&state=44&searchType=parish

It is part of the Orthodox Church of America (OCA).

And sorry for the confusion. It's that now and then the "trend" to indepedent denominations make people create their "own" orthodox churches and I, at least, got confused with the name pan-Orthodox parish. Smiley My fault. That is certainly not the case here. Smiley

Fabio Leite (or anyone else who would like to help me), so does this church count as a real orthodox church?  Sorry, you have confused me.

http://www.htoca.org/htoca/Welcome.html


(just a little side note:  I will be running out to my volunteer work in a few minutes.  So, thanks to anyone else who posts and I will respond tonight when I return home.)
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 02:38:26 PM by Fabio Leite » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2012, 03:04:37 PM »

Hello All, I am so grateful to be here in this forum.  After reading and lurking here for a long time, I see so much love and help freely offered and am amazed by the spirit I find here.

I come here today because I am actually overwhelmed and need some guidance. In fact, I am so overwhelmed that I am not exactly sure where to begin.  Let me start by saying that my parent's had me baptized a Lutheran when I was 5 years old but they never took me to church.  Then in college I converted to Catholicism.  This happened because I wanted to be closer to God and because my boyfriend's family always took me to mass with them.  My family had fallen apart and I was definitely looking for stability.  I didn't even know there was an Orthodox church at the time.  I've since gotten married and my husband (who grew up protestant) have grown together in Christ and are looking for a church to really call home.

He has been going to Mass with me but neither one of us quite feel right there.  We both went to an Orthodox service once and he was upset by it because the people at the church gossiped during the service.  We also went to a local Greek Orthodox Church and spoke to the priest there.  He was absolutely amazing and explained to us that the gossiping during the service was wrong and not normal.  That made my husband feel better.  He is still struggling with feeling like an outsider due to the ethnic part of Orthodoxy but he is willing to work through it.  We have been studying and praying on this issue for years now. On Saturday I attended a lecture at the Catholic church on Marian theology and it had a profound effect on me.  It made me feel like I need to seriously devote my life to God but in a church were apparitions were not more important than Jesus (I hope that makes sense, I am not being critical.  Just telling you what is in my heart).

Hi, Dolly! Welcome to the forum! Let me begin by apologizing to everyone on the thread, because I love to answer these kinds of threads, and usually read through the other answers first to make sure I don't spend a bunch of time telling you something others already have said. However, I'm in a bit of a hurry to get out the door, so I've only skimmed the thread that follows the OP. Sorry if I'm redundant!

Quote
So, here are my questions for anyone willing to try to answer them:
-we have three Orthodox churches near our home: Russian Orthodox, Pan Orthodox, and Greek Orthodox. Which one would you try attending first?

I would like to know what you mean by "Pan Orthodox." In the world, different local (i.e., national) churches exist in various places, and where Orthodoxy is newer, those different churches have sent mission efforts in for the purpose of evangelizing the native population, serving an ethnic diaspora, etc. "Pan Orthodox" is a term that generally means "cross-jurisdictional." i.e., a group made up of folks from different jurisdictions (jurisdiction being a local church, like the Greeks, the Russians, the Serbians, etc.). A parish can be said to be "pan Orthodox" if their members come from many different such backgrounds, but the parish itself will exist in a single jurisdiction, as our Church is a hierarchical one.

By Russian Orthodox, I assume you mean ROCOR (Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia), though you could mean a church belonging to the Russian Patriarchal Parishes. Doesn't really matter. Russian Orthodoxy has a reputation for being more conservative, and more rigid in things like liturgical practice. Their parishes also tend to be ethnic, but are not always. This is especially true where Orthodoxy has been for a while (such as Pennsylvania).

The Greeks tend to be fairly middle-of-the-road, not necessarily conservative or liberal in their piety. It depends on the parish. Greek parishes also have a reputation for being ethnic, but again, that doesn't mean not friendly. I know many that do services mostly or completely in English (same for ROCOR) and always welcome visitors.

While beginning your initial inquiry, before you get attached to a certain priest or parish, I'd recommend going to all of them. This is what the priest who received me had me do, to make sure I understood I was converting to Orthodoxy, and not to just his parish (i.e., be disillusioned if I went elsewhere, even if it were Orthodox).

Quote
-When you go to an Orthodox church for the first time is there anything special we should do or not do?

There isn't particularly anything. You will probably not be able to follow the services quite yet, and have that standard "new person" expression. We can spot it pretty easily. Wink When people know you're new, we can't really expect anything of you, and hopefully folks will come over to say hi, and maybe even offer to answer any questions you've had about the service. Don't feel obligated to venerate icons, cross yourself (though you're Catholic, this may come naturally to you...but we cross a lot more than you Latins!) or anything else. As for movements (e.g., standing, sitting, moving as the priest/deacon censes the temple), just follow the crowd, and don't be worried if something catches you off-guard.

Quote
-I suffer from Celiac Disease.  Does anyone else out there also have this condition (or someone they love) and know how this effects taking communion (I know this is not the proper term in Orthodoxy but I am not sure of it)? 

I've known several Celiacs who are Orthodox, and there are different solutions. Some people can partake normally without issues, by the grace of God. For others, this isn't the case. Some take only a VERY small particle of the Body, and others are only communed with the Blood from the same chalice (as we place our bread into the chalice with the wine). Those who have truly severe issues may be given just the Blood from a separate chalice, separated out before any Body is added)

As for your terminology, "taking communion." it is not unacceptable. Don't worry about it. Perhaps a better way to phrase is "receiving communion" or "partaking [of the Eucharist/Mysteries]", but I doubt you'll offend anyone with your phrasing, especially as an inquirer!

Quote
-Can someone explain how fasting works?  This is a concern to me due to my disease and my husband isn't sure he can do it.

Orthodox fasting occurs almost every Wednesday and Friday of the year, as well as during Great Lent (40 days), Holy Week, Nativity Fast (also, "St. Philip's Fast" or, a Latinized term, "Advent [Fast]", 40 days) the Dormition Fast (For the Dormition (Assumption) of the Mother of God) 14 days, and for the Ss. Peter and Paul Fast (Or, "Apostles Fast", which varies in length).

During a fasting day or period, no animal products are consumed. No meat of any kind, including fish...though seafood such as shrimp, crab, etc. are acceptable. Also no cheese, butter, eggs, milk, etc. Also, no alcohol is taken, particularly wine, though liquors are generally included in the prohibition. Beer is permitted. Oil is also not consumed, but how this is a applied varies. Some partake of no oil, others only olive oil. Most take this prohibition to mean that oil should not be used in excess (i.e., for bread, salad dressings, fried foods etc.), particularly as oil can be found in almost every food item these days.

There are also "relaxed" fasting days that aren't as strict. They generally permit either "wine and oil" or "fish, wine and oil." Though, some days are only "wine" days, and a pre-Lenten week allows the consumption of animal products like cheese, butter or eggs, while disallowing meat.

Fasting is both a corporate and private asceticism. Some, particularly though with diseases or diet problems cannot follow the full "brunt" of the fast, and this is acceptable. If you feel unable to do so, speak with your priest (once you have found a parish and feel comfortable about starting to fast) and work out something that works for you.

Quote
-How do the woman dress at church?  Is it OK to wear dress pants? (I know that sounds stupid but my church people wear shorts and sweat pants) Also, are woman suppose to cover their heads?

This somewhat depends on the parish. Practices differ. The most conservative (such as ROCOR), will want dresses and headscarves. Others are not as strict and do not care if a woman wears a headscarf and/or a dress. It's my personal opinion that folks should look nice for church, meaning button-ups and dress shoes for men, dresses for women. While not everyone is as conservative as myself, most will agree that nothing particularly casual should be worn, like sweatpants or shorts. Wink Think, perhaps, smart casual. That is generally acceptable.

Quote
-Am I missing any questions that you think I should be asking?

There aren't really questions you should or shouldn't be asking, aside from the ones you have. Don't worry, others will pop up as you continue on this journey. Don't sweat it!

Quote
-Can anyone give me any advice on starting this process?

Just start visiting. Check out your local parishes, and speak to the people there. Introduce yourself to the priest. Mention your background, and let them know you're going around to all the local Orthodox parishes to get a broad perspective (if that's what you choose to do, again...I encourage it) and be friendly. No matter what parish you end up with, if you do convert, chances are you'll be seeing people from all the local parishes every now and then.

Quote
Thank you so much.  I realize this is a long and somewhat rambling post.  I just feel that we need to get serious about this and take proper steps. Thank you all and God bless!!!!

No problem! Looking forward to hear more from you, Dolly.

Fabio Leite (or anyone else who would like to help me), so does this church count as a real orthodox church?  Sorry, you have confused me.

http://www.htoca.org/htoca/Welcome.html


(just a little side note:  I will be running out to my volunteer work in a few minutes.  So, thanks to anyone else who posts and I will respond tonight when I return home.)

It took a bit of digging, but yes, this parish is canonical, part of the Orthodox Church in America.
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Marc1152
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Probiotic .. Antibiotic


« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2012, 03:06:48 PM »

Again, I am so very grateful to all of you.  I am always overwhelmed with the kindness and warmth in this forum!  Thank you all so much for reading and responding to my many questions.  I have read all of your answers and they have helped so much!!!  All of it makes so much sense.  I feel a lot less overwhelmed now.  Especially understanding that Orthodoxy isn't a set of unflinching laws.  Knowing that you can go to a priest and talk through things is wonderful.  Not something I have encountered since college.  Please pray for us that we can find our way through this process.  Thank you!!!!

To Marc1152-I really appreciate that you took the time to respond especially since you have taken the time to read Wheat Belly.  I have been aware of the book for a long time.  I have not read it since I have already read most of the books on the topic (especially on the topic of the paleo diet).  I am not certain how "Wheat Belly" portrayed Celiac Disease but it isn't an allergy.  It is a genetic condition (one of the ways to diagnosis it is to take a genetic test).  Even ancient wheat, totally unmodified, will harm me.  I am only telling you this so you understand that it is not an allergy. Many people think that it is for some reason.  But, thank you for your time and understanding.  I very much appreciate your response!!

Look up our Nutrition and Diet thread. I also like the paleo diet which says that none of us can tolerate grains well based on our genetics.
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Your idea has been debunked 1000 times already.. Maybe 1001 will be the charm
Delphine
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« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2012, 03:27:31 PM »

-we have three Orthodox churches near our home: Russian Orthodox, Pan Orthodox, and Greek Orthodox. Which one would you try attending first?
Like other people said, checking to see how much English each church uses in their services is a good start, since attending services that I could understand definitely helped me to feel more comfortable. I also avoided old calendar churches, like Russian Orthodox, because celebrating Christmas at the same time as the rest of my family is important to me. But I'd still try going to all three, since each parish community is slightly different (for example, you'll have to see for yourself how women dress in each parish), and you may connect more with one priest over the others. Which church would you want to establish as your home base for your catechumenate and early years as an Orthodox Christian?


-I suffer from Celiac Disease.  Does anyone else out there also have this condition (or someone they love) and know how this effects taking communion (I know this is not the proper term in Orthodoxy but I am not sure of it)? 
This topic interests me, because I have a friend with a wheat allergy who is considering Orthodoxy. However, she doesn't have Celiac, and on special occasions she may take a few crumbs of a cake people are raving about and deal with the stomach ache. This topic was discussed here, and to me, the takeaway seemed to be that how you receive communion would depend on the priest and the severity of your reaction.
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Dolly
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« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2012, 06:25:31 PM »

Thank you all for the posts that i have just had the chance to read.  Thank you for checking out that church for me.  Sorry for the confusion regarding my description of the types of churches. Honestly, I am a little lost myself right now.  I am just so appreciative of all of the help that you all have given me!!!!  God bless you all!!!
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