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Author Topic: Book burning  (Read 21547 times) Average Rating: 0
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« Reply #90 on: December 11, 2004, 11:43:32 PM »

Yeah, almost on a par with Indian food.   Tongue
Agree 100%!  Indian food is the most sublime thing.  (Big grin.)
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« Reply #91 on: December 12, 2004, 08:18:38 PM »

Ajj this started as a little joke haha funny. fun fun but then I got serious for some reason[i was talking to neoconCatholics that day, so that;s why] Mor ephrem has the right idea

Transmitting humour on a posting can be tricky. Judicious use of smilies and other hints can help.  Otoh, some things aren't joking matters to many people, and Book burning is one of them it would seem.  

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« Reply #92 on: December 12, 2004, 08:33:26 PM »

This is the aspect of Sci-Fi that I am interested in...mostly my interests lie in Fantasy (vs. Sci-Fi), but the quasi-realistic future-speculating sorta sci-fi is something I am very into Smiley I would love some recommendations...my personal favorite thus far is The Time Machine by H.G. Wells...that blew my mind. Smiley I have yet to read 1984, but have it on my shelf and will get to it eventually I am sure.

Well, there is Huxley's Brave New World as a classic.  Then there's The Dispossed by Ursula K. LeGuin.  Others that I've read are This Perfect Day by Ira Levin and an old one Looking Backward by Bellamy  

Some sort of dystopia stories are founded on an idea of "after a holocaust" like climate change, epidemics, nuclear war and so forth.  They could be considered more speculations of how societies would rebuild.  Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale I think sort of fits here.  Though I have to say, I found her axe-grinding too strong.  Laurie King, who most writes mysteries has an SF future society after disaster book that I'm starting, Califia's Daughters.  She wrote in a sort of response to Atwood and her cowed women with the "evil male oppressors" keeping power.

If you like, I can think of more (I'll go paw through the SF shelves in the basement.)  8-)

Ebor
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« Reply #93 on: December 12, 2004, 08:42:17 PM »

As a kind of related idea, the list of 1000 most found books that I linked to over in The Other Board has a subset of what books on the list have been banned at one time or another.  It references a 4 volume work on banning with the reasons given as for reasons of Political, Religious, Sexual or Social grounds.  

Here's the link: http://www.oclc.org/research/top1000/banned.htm

While with some books it was obvious the reason for banning, others puzzled me and I haven't figured them out yet.  For example: #38 on the list is The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes!  Why would *that* be banned, I wonder.    Or #88 Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder.  And in the Hugely Ironic department, #50 on the list is Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.  

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« Last Edit: December 12, 2004, 08:44:19 PM by Ebor » Logged

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« Reply #94 on: December 12, 2004, 09:13:00 PM »

Yeah, almost on a par with Indian food.   Tongue
Which, in turn, if very-well prepared, is almost (but not quite) on a par with German food     :-)
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« Reply #95 on: December 12, 2004, 09:15:06 PM »

Quote
Well, there is Huxley's Brave New World as a classic.  Then there's The Dispossed by Ursula K. LeGuin.  Others that I've read are This Perfect Day by Ira Levin and an old one Looking Backward by Bellamy

Some sort of dystopia stories are founded on an idea of "after a holocaust" like climate change, epidemics, nuclear war and so forth.  They could be considered more speculations of how societies would rebuild.  Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale I think sort of fits here.  Though I have to say, I found her axe-grinding too strong.  Laurie King, who most writes mysteries has an SF future society after disaster book that I'm starting, Califia's Daughters.  She wrote in a sort of response to Atwood and her cowed women with the "evil male oppressors" keeping power.

If you like, I can think of more (I'll go paw through the SF shelves in the basement.)  8-)

Ebor

I actually own Brave New World, so I will make a point to raise it at least a bit on my To Read list (probably from number 116 to 82 hehe). I am also a fan of LeGuin, so I shall remember her as well. I have been meaning to pick up The Handmaiden's Tale for so long now, and I just never get around to it! It's somewhere in the vicinity of #35 on my To Read list Smiley I will get there eventually! Let me know how the Laurie King book that's a response to Atwood's turns out...if it is good, I will have it join Handmaiden's Tale at 35 (they can share a spot if they should be read together hehe).

If you think of any more, do let me know! Also, I noticed you didn't respond to my bit about The Giver...have you read it? If not, I highly recommend it (and you would get through it in about 3 hours, if that, since it is a young adult book...I just gave it to my roomie for Christmas actually, and she plans to read it on the plane back to MN for winter break Grin )
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« Reply #96 on: December 13, 2004, 10:22:38 AM »

I have been meaning to pick up The Handmaiden's Tale for so long now, and I just never get around to it! It's somewhere in the vicinity of #35 on my To Read list Smiley
To be honest, I strongly dis-recommend (is that a word? lol) that particular book.  Had to read it for school.  It's a strong candidate for the preachiest and most implausible work of its type. ;-)
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« Reply #97 on: December 13, 2004, 11:18:05 AM »

Quote
For example: #38 on the list is The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes!  Why would *that* be banned, I wonder. 

If I remember correctly, it was banned in the Soviet Union because of references to "occultism and spiritualism".  Being a Sherlockian myself, I cannot for the life of me find these supposed references.  I really would think the only place that might have a case for banning any Holmes stories would have been Utah because of the villification the Mormons, particuarly Brigham Young, received in "A Study in Scarlet"!
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« Reply #98 on: December 13, 2004, 05:01:04 PM »

Well book burning in any country in any part of the world can infringe people's freedom. Of the writer wants to express his feelings let his do so even if it hurts them Let them experience what your experienceing. Just as long the Church perspective is pointed out and he can decry his foul. I beleieve we express our anxiety at someone that we cant fully understand the spectrums of the whole box. It can benefit all of us so much.  thank you

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« Reply #99 on: December 13, 2004, 05:54:15 PM »



If I remember correctly, it was banned in the Soviet Union because of references to "occultism and spiritualism".

Bet it was banned because of Holmes' cocaine use.
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« Reply #100 on: December 14, 2004, 12:15:40 AM »

Also, I noticed you didn't respond to my bit about The Giver...have you read it? If not, I highly recommend it (and you would get through it in about 3 hours, if that, since it is a young adult book...I just gave it to my roomie for Christmas actually, and she plans to read it on the plane back to MN for winter break Grin )

I read "The Giver" some years ago.  It definitely is a dystopian book for me.  I'm afraid that some of the things in it were rather distressing.  As I recall, there is an infant that doesn't respond to being 'programmed' in behavioor, it doesn't fit in.  So it is casually destroyed.  With our youngest having mild Downs that cut too close to home.  I have found since having children of our own that I cannot read about children getting maltreated/dying.  A flaw on my part.  The killing of the old people at a certain time was chilling as well as the view that the women who bear children for the society are not to be emulated.  That it's low status to be a parent.  In some ways,these ideas are in "This Perfect Day".

By coincidence, my eldest brought "The Giver" home from the school library this past week. Perhaps I can look over it.

Ebor
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« Reply #101 on: December 14, 2004, 12:20:19 AM »



I have been meaning to pick up The Handmaiden's Tale for so long now, and I just never get around to it! It's somewhere in the vicinity of #35 on my To Read list Smiley I will get there eventually! Let me know how the Laurie King book that's a response to Atwood's turns out...if it is good, I will have it join Handmaiden's Tale at 35 (they can share a spot if they should be read together hehe).


I found the Handmaid's Tale to be overrated.  I much preferred Cat's Eye, also by Margaret Atwood.  I read it years ago and it still sticks with me. 
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« Reply #102 on: December 14, 2004, 12:25:04 AM »


To be honest, I strongly dis-recommend (is that a word? lol) that particular book. Had to read it for school. It's a strong candidate for the preachiest and most implausible work of its type. ;-)

Well, I don't say that it's a *good* book, but it definitely is dystopian. And it could be a good example of "See this book. The Author thinks she has an IMPORTANT MESSAGE. She is going to Make Sure The Reader Gets It." And it can lead to discussion about why this is so.

I confess that I'm not keen on Margaret Atwood. She doesn't think she writes SF and has a low opinion of that genre. I get a monthly email SF news and information publication called "Ansible". It usually has a section called "As Others See US". Margaret Atwood has been there several times with comments about Science Fiction being about "talking squids in space".  :- Harummph.

Always Coming Home is another LeGuin. I found the cultural and background parts of it more interesting then some of the 3 parts of the story. Then again, how can I forget The Left Hand of Darkness

Ebor
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« Reply #103 on: December 14, 2004, 03:25:09 PM »


Yah anastasios,
We in Michigan also have plenty of Protestants.. [There's only 3 million Catholics here] Especially around Grand Rapids. Please do remember that Michigan also has a huge Muslim population[for da USA] and Muslims are scarier than Protestants with their shrieks to da devil and terrible smelling food.

Have you ever put your nose in saurkraut? Not exactly a bed of roses.
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« Reply #104 on: December 14, 2004, 08:41:59 PM »



Have you ever put your nose in saurkraut? Not exactly a bed of roses.
I've never had sauerkraut. I only eat kapusta!!! Polish people have basically two types of kapusta. The fresh type and the aged one. Aged resembles german insult to kapusta. Tongue Wink
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« Reply #105 on: December 14, 2004, 08:58:42 PM »

 


 I am beginning to hear the strains of the "Horst Wessel Lied" coming from this thread.  I can't believe it was started!!!
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« Reply #106 on: December 14, 2004, 10:02:32 PM »

I can't believe people took this so seriously!  Tongue
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« Reply #107 on: December 14, 2004, 10:02:45 PM »

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Have you ever put your nose in saurkraut?

Why would anyone purposely put their nose in sauerkraut?

Or do you have a humourus story about how this happened to you? Wink

If so, do tell! Cheesy
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« Reply #108 on: December 14, 2004, 10:59:34 PM »

Quote
I read "The Giver" some years ago.  It definitely is a dystopian book for me.  I'm afraid that some of the things in it were rather distressing.  As I recall, there is an infant that doesn't respond to being 'programmed' in behavioor, it doesn't fit in.  So it is casually destroyed.  With our youngest having mild Downs that cut too close to home.  I have found since having children of our own that I cannot read about children getting maltreated/dying.  A flaw on my part.  The killing of the old people at a certain time was chilling as well as the view that the women who bear children for the society are not to be emulated.  That it's low status to be a parent.  In some ways,these ideas are in "This Perfect Day".

By coincidence, my eldest brought "The Giver" home from the school library this past week. Perhaps I can look over it.

Ebor 

There are many things in The Giver that are distressing, I will give you that! It is the first book I ever had an emotional response really, when I read it in 6th grade. It was the first book that actually made me think and even feel, and so I can honestly say that The Giver changed my life at that point, as short as it (my life) had been thus far.

There is also immense hope in the book as well, and the especially distressing moments make the final few chapters all the more beautiful in their determined hopefulness. I definitely recommend you pick it up again if you can. Smiley
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« Reply #109 on: December 14, 2004, 11:30:35 PM »

I can't believe people took this so seriously! Tongue
Umfa, umfa, umfa,umfa.
Na zielonej Ukrainie, [in the green ukraine]
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« Reply #110 on: December 14, 2004, 11:54:36 PM »

Huh???  Huh
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« Reply #111 on: December 14, 2004, 11:57:33 PM »

Huh??? Huh


i second that "Huh?".
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« Reply #112 on: May 06, 2009, 02:37:08 PM »

I wanna burn all those cheap and inexpensive romance novels they sell at cash registers, the really thick ones where the woman on the cover is enraptured by and embracing the large, beefy Fabio look-alike, and the title is in big gold letters, and the entire thing is raised from the paper so that even the blind can feel Fabio, and take him home for only $2.95.  I want to burn them because they suck.

I agree that it is better to refute intangible ideas rather than burn tangible objects. But some things are worthy of the fire, for example pornography. I don't need to familiarize myself with all forms of pornography in order to know that it is damnable. Of course you will always have these fools who want to split hairs and say, "Who is to decide what constitutes pornography?" and so on. And I for one think that these "romance novels" are worthy of the fire. It is outrageous that my children have to be exposed to these grotesque images whenever they walk through our local Books-A-Million. 

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« Reply #113 on: May 07, 2009, 11:00:11 AM »

Well, I don't mean to be difficult, I assure you, but is it always a case of "fools splitting hairs" with the question of what is "pornography"?  Michaelanglo's "David" is a nude, and has been considered by some people as "pornographic" and by others as a masterpiece of sculpture.  While there is a lot that is very clearly (and intended to be) prurient with no "redeeming social value" as it were. there are other works that *some* say are obscene but that others do not or that it is a minority that declares that anything that shows or tells something is unacceptable due to their own "lens".

Ebor
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« Reply #114 on: May 07, 2009, 04:42:14 PM »

The only thing I could think of when I saw this title was the Königgrätzer Marsch, and Sean Connery saying "My son, we're pilgrims in an unholy land..."
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« Reply #115 on: May 13, 2009, 09:40:26 PM »

The only thing I could think of when I saw this title was the Königgrätzer Marsch, and Sean Connery saying "My son, we're pilgrims in an unholy land..."

Bingo!  Nice reference; my first thought too (of course, seeing the movie again not even a week ago helps).
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« Reply #116 on: May 14, 2009, 01:55:01 PM »

Can we burn Twighlight?
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« Reply #117 on: May 14, 2009, 02:26:42 PM »

I'd suport banning any of Judy Blume's books. I remember her boks being passed around when I was in elementary school, at that was in the late 70's early 80's! Her books were shrewdly packaged to sexualize children at an early age; and being raised in a non-Christian home I was very susceptible to her insidious message.

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