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Author Topic: Celtic Christian chant  (Read 610 times) Average Rating: 0
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William
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« on: August 23, 2012, 09:56:55 PM »

Does any poster here happen to know anything about the Celtic church's chant tradition? Did it borrow any elements from Celtic folk music? Does it still exist today?
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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2012, 11:07:36 PM »

Celtic folk music as we have it today (if you mean Irish, Scots, Welsh and other sorts of folk music) almost all comes from long after the time of St. Patrick and events prior to the Council of Whitby and other events.   From what I have read "Brian Boru's March" is one of the oldest tunes that still exists in Irish music and he died at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014. 

The Chieftains and Brian Boru's March on the Uillan Pipes and Bodhran (small pipes and large hand held drum) and then the rest of the group joining in.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9h2Qmx2zp4E
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William
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« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2012, 12:08:15 AM »

Celtic folk music as we have it today (if you mean Irish, Scots, Welsh and other sorts of folk music) almost all comes from long after the time of St. Patrick and events prior to the Council of Whitby and other events.   From what I have read "Brian Boru's March" is one of the oldest tunes that still exists in Irish music and he died at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014. 

The Chieftains and Brian Boru's March on the Uillan Pipes and Bodhran (small pipes and large hand held drum) and then the rest of the group joining in.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9h2Qmx2zp4E


Thanks. I'm guessing that eventually everyone in the isles went to whatever the English church was using (Gregorian?). I wonder what they sang in before. Since St. Patrick and other missionaries were Roman, maybe they used Old Roman chant?
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Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant

Leave there thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift. - Matt. 5:24
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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2012, 12:17:33 AM »

Does any poster here happen to know anything about the Celtic church's chant tradition? Did it borrow any elements from Celtic folk music? Does it still exist today?

Yes, Celtic Psalm Chant is still used by the Irish & Scottish Protestants, Amish, Mennonites. The Catholic Church in Ireland also uses it but not as often as the churches I stated earlier.

Here are song good links:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMqKxpq6QAE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3MzZgPBL3Q
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txIx9b07RhY&feature=relmfu
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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2012, 10:20:36 PM »

Does any poster here happen to know anything about the Celtic church's chant tradition? Did it borrow any elements from Celtic folk music? Does it still exist today?

Yes, Celtic Psalm Chant is still used by the Irish & Scottish Protestants, Amish, Mennonites. The Catholic Church in Ireland also uses it but not as often as the churches I stated earlier.

Here are song good links:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMqKxpq6QAE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3MzZgPBL3Q
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txIx9b07RhY&feature=relmfu

Unbelievable! Why haven't I heard of this earlier?
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William
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« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2012, 03:22:00 AM »

That don't sound as nice as I was hoping.  Sad

Are you sure that's a specific chant style and not just psalms in a Gaelic language?
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Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant

Leave there thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift. - Matt. 5:24
Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)
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« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2012, 02:20:54 PM »

That don't sound as nice as I was hoping.  Sad

Are you sure that's a specific chant style and not just psalms in a Gaelic language?

I believe it is a specific chant style. Now, please do not make too much fun of me but I have a theory that stems from the similarity between Gaelic and Bulgarian singing, where I think I hear the influence of bagpipes, particularly on the notes that conclude a phrase. I do not have the musical expertise to describe what is happening precisely but it seems to me that either (a) the music was influenced be the instruments they had or (b) the Celts had influence way past the borders of the Islands.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxDIwMdYdIY
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