Author Topic: Keeping the Khachkars  (Read 513 times)

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Offline CoptoGeek

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Keeping the Khachkars
« on: August 13, 2012, 10:56:00 AM »
Keeping the Khachkars
Ansel Oommen, August 10, 2012

The cross is the most familiar symbol of Christianity worldwide, but nowhere is this iconography as crucial or entrenched in the culture as it is in Armenia. Thousands of khachkars, or cross-stones, dot the mountains of the world’s oldest Christian nation, revealing both the art of spiritual expression and its modern desecration.

http://www.firstthings.com/onthesquare/2012/08/keeping-the-khachkars
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Offline Salpy

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Re: Keeping the Khachkars
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2015, 09:30:39 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO-af17FefY

Video showing a sculptor making two khachkars for the 100th anniversary of the Genocide.  That take such talent and patience.   :)

Offline wgw

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Re: Keeping the Khachkars
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2015, 08:05:43 PM »
I love Khachkars.  Is it appropriate to buy small examples for your home chapel / dining room?  Id call it an icon corner except it is on a single wall.
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Offline Salpy

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Re: Keeping the Khachkars
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2015, 09:13:00 PM »
It's perfectly appropriate to have small khachkars in the home.  Finding them can be a bit tricky, though.  Usually they are hand carved from wood and are small enough that someone could put them on a table or desk.  Most come from Armenia, so supplies are not consistent.  A store may have a few one month, and then have none for a while.  So I would call around first to see if a store has them, and ask about prices.

You could try the Armenian Diocese bookstore in Burbank.  Call ahead before you go, though, as they are not always open.  Also, there is Berj Bookstore, and Abril Books in Glendale.  St. Vartan Bookstore in New York may have some.  I would e-mail them about it if you can't find them elsewhere.

Offline Aram

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Re: Keeping the Khachkars
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2015, 10:03:57 PM »
You'll probably have the most luck finding a wooden khatchkar. I bought a small tufa stone khatchkar in Armenia, but I don't know if I've ever seen one for sale here.

Offline caladri

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Re: Keeping the Khachkars
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2015, 02:15:36 AM »
I am ignorant of the cultural history and context here, but out of curiosity did look around online some.  It does seem like one can buy khachkars carved from tuff online, although something about the site I found strikes me as a bit off; not all links work (e.g. for about page), and everything is a bit too pristine.  Barshamin; they seem to have quite a variety, such as this one.  Are the khachkars on their site representative of what one might see in a home in Armenia?

Offline Salpy

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Re: Keeping the Khachkars
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2015, 03:23:27 PM »
I've never seen that website before.  Interesting.   :)

There are a variety of khachkars on this page:

http://barshamin.com/decoration#limit=10&mode=grid&order=position&dir=asc&p=1&culture%5B%5D=139

Like Aram said, the wooden ones are more common in the US and they are the sort of thing you see in Armenian stores and in people's homes.  The tuff would be more traditional, but you don't see them as often.

I've never seen the egg-shaped one before.  I'm not sure I like it.  It's rather odd.   :o