Author Topic: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)  (Read 42760 times)

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Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #180 on: May 14, 2017, 07:48:36 PM »
The pattern for those who have received the sacerdotal dignity is found in the testimonies and instructions laid down in the canonical constitutions, which we receiving with a glad mind, sing unto the Lord God in the words of the God-inspired David, saying: "I have had as great delight in the way of your testimonies as in all manner of riches." "You have commanded righteousness as your testimonies for ever." "Grant me understanding and I shall live." Now if the word of prophesy bids us keep the testimonies of God forever and to live by them, it is evident that they must abide unshaken and without change. Therefore Moses, the prophet of God, speaks after this manner: "To them nothing is to be added, and from them nothing is to be taken away." And the divine Apostle glorying in them cries out, "which things the angels desire to look into," and, "if an angel preach to you anything besides that which you have received, let him be anathema."

Seeing these things are so, being thus well-testified unto us, we rejoice over them as he that has found great spoil, and press to our bosom with gladness the divine canons, holding fast all the precepts of the same, complete and without change, whether they have been set forth by the holy trumpets of the Spirit, the renowned Apostles, or by the Six Ecumenical Councils, or by Councils locally assembled for promulgating the decrees of the said Ecumenical Councils, or by our holy Fathers. For all these, being illumined by the same Spirit, defined such things as were expedient. Accordingly those whom they placed under anathema, we likewise anathematize; those whom they deposed, we also depose; those whom they excommunicated, we also excommunicate; and those whom they delivered over to punishment, we subject to the same penalty. And now "let your conversation be without covetousness," cries out Paul the divine Apostle, who was caught up into the third heaven and heard unspeakable words.

-- Seventh Ecumenical Council (787), Canon 1
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #181 on: May 16, 2017, 06:43:12 PM »
Though hitherto some bishops having descended to the habit of monks, have been forced nevertheless to remain in height of the prelacy, they have been overlooked when they did so. But, with this in mind, this holy and ecumenical Council, with a view to regulating this oversight, and readjusting this irregular practice to the ecclesiastical statutes, has decreed that if any bishop or anyone else with a prelatical office is desirous of descending to monastic life and of replenishing the region of penitence and of penance, let him no longer cherish any claim to prelatical dignity. For the monks’ conditions of subordination represent the relationship of pupilship, and not of teachership or of presidency; nor do they undertake to pastor others, but are to be content with being pastored. Wherefore, in accordance with what was said previously, we decree that none of those who are on the prelatical list and are enrolled pastors shall lower themselves to the level of the pastored and repentant. If anyone should dare to do so, after the delivery and discrimination of the decision hereby being pronounced, he having deprived himself of his prelatical rank, shall no longer have the right to return to his former status, which by actual deeds he has vitiated.

-- (Ecumenical?) Council of Constantinople (879), Canon 2
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #182 on: May 17, 2017, 10:01:17 PM »
I rejoice, beloved brother and fellow priest, that you are deserving of the highest prize of virtue. You have approached the hitherto stony and barren hearts of the pagans, trusting in the plenitude of your faith, and have labored untiringly with the plowshare of Gospel preaching, striving by your daily toil to change them into fertile fields. To you may well be applied the Gospel saying: "The voice of one crying in the wilderness," etc. Yet a part of the second prize shall be given, not unfittingly, to those who support so pious and useful a work with what help they can give and supplement the poverty of those laborers with means sufficient to carry on zealously the work of preaching which has already been begun and to raise up new sons to Christ. And so I have with affectionate good will taken pains to suggest to Your Prudence a few things that may show you how, according to my ideas, you may most readily overcome the resistance of those uncivilized people.

Do not begin by arguing with them about the origin of their gods, false as they are, but let them affirm that some of them were begotten by others through the intercourse of male and female, so that you may at least prove that gods and goddesses born after the manner of men are men and not gods and, since they did not exist before, must have had a beginning. Then, when they have been compelled to learn that their gods had a beginning since some were begotten by others, they must be asked in the same way whether they believe that the world had a beginning or was always in existence without beginning. If it had a beginning, who created it? Certainly they can find no place where begotten gods could dwell before the universe was made. I mean by "universe" not merely this visible earth and sky, but the whole vast extent of space, and this the heathen too can imagine in their thoughts.  But if they argue that the world always existed without beginning, you should strive to refute this and to convince them by many documents and arguments. Ask your opponents who governed the world before the gods were born, who was the ruler? How could they bring under their dominion or subject to their law a universe that had always existed before them? And whence, or from whom or when, was the first god or goddess set up or begotten?...

These and many similar things which it would take long to enumerate you ought to put before them, not offensively or so as to anger them, but calmly and with great moderation. At intervals you should compare their superstitions with our Christian doctrines, touching upon them from the flank, as it were, so that the pagans, thrown into confusion rather than angered, may be ashamed of their absurd ideas and may undertand that their infamous ceremonies and fables are well known to us... If they boast that the rule of the gods over those people has been, as it were, lawful from the beginning, show them that the whole world was once given over to idol-worship, until by the grace of Christ and through the knowledge of one God, its Almighty Founder and Ruler, it was enlightened, brought to life, and reconciled to God. For what is the daily baptism of the children of believing Christians but a purification of each one from the uncleanness and giult in which the whole world was once involved?

-- Bp. Daniel of Winchester (d. 745), Letter to Saint Boniface
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #183 on: May 18, 2017, 10:27:44 PM »
For what would be worse than separation from You, O Savior?
And what is more grievous than to be cut off from life,
and from thence to live as a corpse deprived of life,
at once to have all goods taken away?
For one who is separated from You is deprived of every good.
For then it will not be as it is now on earth.
For now, those who are ignorant of You live in bodily self-indulgence,
and here they exult like leaping, irrational beasts.
They have all things that You have given for the enjoyments of life,
and seeing only these things, they suppose it will be
the same after the departure of their soul and of their life.
But they speculate badly, and badly do they believe
when they say that they are not with You, but still they
prepare a certain place of repose--oh the folly--
They do not receive light, yet they have no share in darkness,
they are outside the Kingdom, but also outside of hell,
both outside the bridal chamber, and away from the fire of punishment,
the wretched pray to arrive in such a place.
And they say there is no need for your eternal glory
or the Kingdom of Heaven, but it is enough to be in repose.
Alas for their darkness! Alas for their ignorance!
Alas their wretchedness and vain hopes!

-- St. Symeon the New Theologian (d. 1022), Divine Eros: Hymns of Saint Symeon the New Theologian, Hymn 1
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #184 on: May 19, 2017, 09:10:02 PM »
As the son of a priest, Ephraim yearned for a spiritual and ascetical life from an early age. He fled to Mt. Athos when his parents wanted him to marry. He later returned and lived a life of asceticism in the Ibar gorge and in the Monastery of Dečani [Kosovo]. When rivalry and war broke out concerning precedence in the state and, unfortunately, even in the Church, the Synod [Sabor] chose Ephraim to succeed the deceased Sava as patriarch in 1375 A.D. When he was informed of his election, he wept bitterly but was unable to refuse. He crowned Prince Lazar as Tsar in 1382 A.D., then renounced his throne and turned it over to Spyridon and again withdrew to the wilderness. Following the death of Spyridon in 1388 A.D., Tsar Lazar begged him to accept the throne again. He governed the Serbian Church in the difficult time of the defeat at Kosovo [1389 A.D.] until 1400 A.D. when he died in the eighty-eighth year of his earthly life and took up his habitation with the Lord, Whom he loved. His relics repose in the Monastery of Peć [Kosovo].

-- Said of St. Ephraim of Serbia (d. 1400) in the Prologue of Ohrid
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #185 on: May 21, 2017, 03:12:30 PM »
It was with the instinct of a mother that the future saint taught her spiritual children. And in the same spirit she gave thanks for the immense fruit that it bore in their lives. These and other experiences instilled such assurance of the Lord’s presence in their work that Irene asked Him (our Lord God) for the most responsible charisma of all, that of foresight, so that she might be able to have knowledge of the sisters’ impending trials, not for the purpose of gaining fame but to be better able to advise them. In answer to this prayer, there appeared to her a guardian angle who greeted her, saying, “Hail, fruitful servant of God, the Lord has sent me that more might be saved through your guidance. I am to remain at your side and disclose the events of the future. He then disappeared, yet remained with her, continually revealing the hidden problems not only of the nuns but of all who sought her advice. Irene in no way used this knowledge to reprimand or humiliate people but corrected their confessions in such a way that they understood she had certain supernatural powers. Her fame spread to such an extent that rich and poor alike gathered to seek her advice and yet, continually offering thanks to God, she increased in humility.

Soon after, her sister, the wife of Prince Varda, sent her eunuch to see Irene who was thus able to inform him of a recent revelation that the Prince would soon die at the wish of the Emperor Michael, who would himself immediately lose his life and kingdom. Despite the obvious confidential nature of the information, the sister told her husband everything. Nevertheless, with characteristic pride and lack of faith, he dismissed the idea. The events took their course and as the saint predicted, the following week he was killed in battle, closely followed by the unworthy Emperor. Irene continued her very remarkable ministry in the reign of his successor, Basil the Macedonian.

-- The Life Of Saint Irene of Cappadocia (d. 9th century), Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #186 on: May 27, 2017, 08:50:32 PM »
The altar corresponds to the holy tomb of Christ. On it Christ brought Himself as a sacrifice to [His] God and Father through the offering of His body as a sacrificial lamb, and as highpriest and Son of Man, offering and being offered as a mystical bloodless sacrifice, and appointing for the faithful reasonable worship, through which we have become sharers in eternal and immortal life. This lamb Moses prefigured in Egypt "towards evening" when its blood turned back the destroyer so that he would not kill the people (cf Ex. 12:7-13). The expression "towards evening" signifies that towards evening the true lamb is sacrificed, the One who takes away the sin of the world on his cross, "For Christ, our Pascha, has been sacrificed for us" (cf 1 Cor. 5:7).

The altar is and is called the heavenly and spiritual altar, where the earthly and material priests who always assist and serve the Lord represent the spiritual, serving, and hierarchical powers of the immaterial and celestial Powers, for they also must be as a burning fire. For the Son of God and Judge of all ordained the laws and established the services of both the heavenly and the earthly (powers).

-- St. Germanus of Constantinople (d. 740), On the Divine Liturgy (Source)
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #187 on: May 29, 2017, 04:55:17 PM »
There are pleasures of the soul and pleasures of the body. The pleasures of the soul are those which are the exclusive possession of the soul, such as the pleasures of learning and contemplation. The pleasures of the body, however, are those which are enjoyed by soul and body in fellowship, and hence are called bodily pleasures: and such are the pleasures of food and intercourse and the like. But one could not find any class of pleasures belonging solely to the body. Again, some pleasures are true, others false. And the exclusively intellectual pleasures consist in knowledge and contemplation, while the pleasures of the body depend upon sensation. Further, of bodily pleasures , some are both natural and necessary, in the absence of which life is impossible, for example the pleasures of food which replenishes waste, and the pleasures of necessary clothing. Others are natural but not necessary, as the pleasures of natural and lawful intercourse. For though the function that these perform is to secure the permanence of the race as a whole, it is still possible to live a virgin life apart from them.

Others, however, are neither natural nor necessary, such as drunkenness, lust, and surfeiting to excess. For these contribute neither to the maintenance of our own lives nor to the succession of the race, but on the contrary, are rather even a hindrance. He therefore that would live a life acceptable to God must follow after those pleasures which are both natural and necessary: and must give a secondary place to those which are natural but not necessary, and enjoy them only in fitting season, and manner, and measure; while the others must be altogether renounced. Those then are to be considered moral pleasures which are not bound up with pain, and bring no cause for repentance, and result in no other harm and keep within the bounds of moderation, and do not draw us far away from serious occupations, nor make slaves of us.

-- St. John of Damascus (d. 749), Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 2.13
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Rohzek

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #188 on: May 29, 2017, 09:44:41 PM »
And she said to them, " Just as you know, what I have been able to say is of God. Thus that what I intend to do to, you shall prove whether if it be of God, [and] you shall pray that God may make my plan strong. Stand at the gate this night, and I will go with my maidservant and you shall pray just like what you have said, that in five days the Lord may look down upon his people Israel" (Judith 8:30-32). Judith entrusts the gate with the presbyters, because the holy Church entrusts the careful protection of the fortress of God to the priests of Christ, so that they will strive to defend it through the armament of prayers with careful effort and skill, and to keep her unhurt from the snares of the enemy.

- St. Hrabanus Maurus (d. 856), Exposition on Judith, Patrologia Latina 109: 0563A-0563B
« Last Edit: May 29, 2017, 09:45:21 PM by Rohzek »
"Il ne faut imaginer Dieu ni trop bon, ni méchant. La justice est entre l'excès de la clémence et la cruauté, ainsi que les peines finies sont entre l'impunité et les peines éternelles." - Denise Diderot, Pensées philosophiques 1746

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #189 on: June 02, 2017, 06:00:49 PM »
"Then," it says, "when all things were prepared for the journey, Tobias bade his father and mother farewell, and the two set out together." (Tob. 5:22) When the Lord appeared in the flesh, all those things that pertained to the world's redemption were prepared, namely, Christ's virtues, his teaching, temptation, suffering, resurrection, ascension, the sending of the Holy Spirit, the faith of believers, and persecution by unbelievers. By these thins the faith and life of the Holy Church are nourished and strengthened until he brings the life of this age to a close. When these things came to pass in Judea, that "mediator between God and humans" (1 Tim. 2:5) proclaimed the joys of heavenly salvation and peace through the apostles to the people and synagogue, whence he had received his origin in the flesh; and to those who through him were willing to believe and accept these things he gave himself, and in this way also he came to save the Gentiles through these same teachers.

"Tobias thus set out and the dog followed him." (Tob. 6:1) When the Lord came to save the nations, holy preachers followed in his footsteps to fulfill what he commanded: "Go and teach all nations." (Matt. 28:19) And so the Lord himself first filled Cornelius' household with the Holy Spirit and peter duly baptized them with water. (Acts 10:44-48) Now teachers are [here] called 'dogs' because they defend their Master's spiritual household, wealth, and sheep from thieves and beasts, that is, from unclean spirits and heretical persons. Having set out with the angel as a guide, Tobias "spent the first night by the river Tigris, and when he went out to wash his feet, behold, an enormous fish sprang up to devour him." (Tob. 6:1-2) Here again the mystery of the Lord's suffering is plainly signified. For the huge fish that Tobias killed at the angel's prompting, after it tried to devour him, signifies the ancient devourer of humankind, namely the devil, whom the divine power snared while [the devil] was eagerly anticipating the death of the flesh in our Redeemer.

The river Tigris, which owing to its rapid course takes its name from the tiger, the swiftest beast, indicates the downward course of our death and morality. In it the enormous fish lay hidden because humanity's invisible seducer "had power over death." (Heb. 2:14) Tobias remained at the flowing Tigris because when the Lord appeared in the world, he led his life among sinners and mortals, yet the water of sin did not touch him nor did the prince of darkness find anything of his own in [the Lord] when he came near. And just as Tobias went out to the river to wash his feet, so the Lord accepted death, to which he owed no debts, so that he might wash all the faithful (that is, his own members) from death's and sin's contagion. The fish fell upon Tobias and wanted to devour him; when the Lord suffered the cross, the devil--who had instructed that he be crucified--came, hoping by chance to find some wickedness in his soul. Terrified of the fish, Tobias cried out in a loud voice saying, 'Sir, it is coming upon me.' (Tob. 6:3) So also, when the point of death drew near, the Lord "began to fear and grow weary." (Mark 14:33) He feared not the devil, but did shudder at death, which 'entered the whole world through the devil's envy' through the natural weakness of the flesh. (Wis. 2:24) Because of this "he also prayed that if it might be done, the house might pass from him, and he said, 'Abba, Father, all things are possible for you. Take this cup from me, but [do] not what I want, but what you want.'" (Mark 14:35-36)

"The angel said to Tobias, 'grab the fish's gill and draw him to you.'" (Tob. 6:4) The Lord grabbed the devil and through his own dying took and vanquished the very one that had wanted to take him in death. Now he grabbed his gill so that he might cut off that most vile head from the trapped body with the right hand of his power; that is, so that the loving Redeemer might both sever the ancient enemy's wickedness from the heart of those whom he had wickedly united to himself--and had made as though they were one body with him--and ingraft these into the body of his own Church. For a fish has its gill where its head and body meet. Now just as our Lord is head of his Church, and the Church is truly his body, so too is the devil head of all the wicked and they are all his body, his members. (Eph. 1:22-23; 5:23) So the Lord grabbed that monstrous fish's gill, drew [the fish] to himself, and threw it upon the shore because in shattering the devil's power he openly delivered and confidently uprooted those whom he foreknew to be sons of light from the power of darkness. (Col. 1:13)

-- St. Bede the Venerable (d. 735), On Tobias
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #190 on: June 09, 2017, 11:02:30 PM »
When at times the sound of useless things beat on the ears of some well-tested men, and the obscene song of laymen disturbed their sanctity, asked by certain brothers worthy of memory, and especially when the words of a certain reverend lady, by the name of Judith, urged me to write for them in German part of the Gospels, so that a small amount of the reading of this song might cancel out the play of worldly voices and, occupied with the sweetness of the Gospels in their own language, they would be able to forego the sound of useless things...
 
Therefore, since through love of those who were spurring me on, I could not refuse, I acted, not as a skilled person, but as one forced by brotherly petition.  I wrote, you see, supported by the demand of their prayers, a portion of the Gospels set down in Frankish, mixing in now and then spiritual and moral  words, in order that whoever is put off by the difficulty of a foreign language as to them, might comprehend the most  holy words here in his own language, and understanding the law of God in his own language, might shrink from deviating from it evan a little through his own thinking...

This book, therefore, I have taken care to transmit to your wise judgment for approval -- because my humble self was educated by Rhaban of blessed memory, formerly worthy Bishop of your see -- I have taken care to commend it to the dignity of your Bishopness and to the equal wisdom in you.  If it pleases the vision of Your Holiness and should it not judge it to be to be rejected, may your authority grant that it be used freely by the faithful; but, if indeed it appears less fitting and is commensurate with my carelessness, may that same venerable and holy authority condemn it.  My humble little person, indeed, recommends that the judgment of either action be left up to your will.

-- Otfrid of Weissenburg (d. 870), Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Rohzek

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #191 on: June 09, 2017, 11:39:52 PM »
And Holofernes said to Judith, "Drink and lie down in delight, because you have found favor before me." And Judith said, "I drink, [my] lord, because today my soul is magnified before all my days." And she received and chewed and drank before THAT man everything which her maidservant had prepared for her (Judith 12:17-19). Notice that Judith flirting with Holofernes was not polluted with the foods or drink of the pagans, but she chewed it and drank what her maidservant had prepared for her. For the Church dwelling among the nations is in no way polluted by idolatry or the superstition of the pagans, but uses these [prepared foods], which it judges to be worthy for its victory, which the devotion of the faithful prepares for itself through obedience and the exercise of good works. Concerning the food the Truth itself in the Gospel says, "You all work for food, which does not perish, but which abides in eternal life (John 6:27)." And elsewhere, when the disciples question him, as they were chewing, he responded, "I have food to eat, which you know nothing of. Indeed, my food is that I do the will of Him who sent me and that I accomplish His work. (John 4:32;34)."

- St. Hrabanus Maurus (d. 856), Exposition on Judith, Patrologia Latina 109: 0572A - 0572B
« Last Edit: June 09, 2017, 11:41:34 PM by Rohzek »
"Il ne faut imaginer Dieu ni trop bon, ni méchant. La justice est entre l'excès de la clémence et la cruauté, ainsi que les peines finies sont entre l'impunité et les peines éternelles." - Denise Diderot, Pensées philosophiques 1746

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #192 on: June 17, 2017, 09:26:05 PM »
St. John wore heavy iron crosses on his body, and on his head he wore a large iron cap, for which he was known as “John the Big Cap.” When he later came to Moscow he walked around barefoot and almost naked even in the bitterest cold...

John feared God alone, and spoke the truth to every person no matter how highly placed. Even to Tsar Boris Gudunov he would often repeat the words: “You, with your smart head in the air, take a look at God’s affairs. God has a lot of patience [at] first, but when He [punishes], it really hurts.”...

Not long before his death in 1589, healings occurred at his prayers. For example, one day a lame man was walking by the church as St. John was coming out. The fool-for-Christ, as if accidentally, stepped on his toes and he leg was restored to health.

-- St. John of Moscow the Fool for Christ.. (d. 1589), Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #193 on: July 24, 2017, 07:17:21 PM »
If there is little evidence of Scottish clergy keeping contact with Irish councils, there is even less for their participation in any of the general councils of the church as a whole. The only possible example is a council held in Rome by Pope Gregory II in 721, when the sederunt included two bishops who are accorded titles that identify one as a Scot and the other as a Pict. Just possibly their areas of episcopal authority were Strathclyde and Abernethy in Perthshire; but alternatively it has been assumed that they both came from Ireland or at any rate Gaeldom. No other general councils are known to have been attended by bishops from Scotland until the Twelfth century.

And contacts of any kind with Rome since the earlier missionary days were very few indeed--Cellach II bishop of St. Andrews is said to have exceptionally gone there for confirmation 966 x 971; and King Macbeth is reported to have gone there in 1050. Mentions of contacts with the Anglo-Saxon church after Whitby are similarly minimal: just once in 978 is an otherwise unidentified Beornelmus mentioned as bishop from Scotia (which at that date must surely mean Scotland north of the River Forth) when attending with Dunstan archbishop of Canterbury a council at Calne in Wiltshire.

-- Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #194 on: October 10, 2017, 10:07:29 PM »
The first gate of entry to the noetic Jerusalem--that is, to attentiveness of the intellect--is the deliberate silencing of your tongue, even though the intellect itself may not yet be still. The second gate is balanced self-control in food and drink. The third, is ceaseless mindfulness of death, for this purifies intellect and body. Having once experienced the beauty of this mindfulness of death, I was so wounded and delighted by it--in Spirit, not through the eye--that I wanted to make it my life's companion, for I was enraptured by its loveliness and majesty, its humility and contrite joy, by how full of reflection it is, how apprehensive of the judgment to come, and how aware of life's anxieties. It makes life-giving, healing tears flow from our bodily eyes, while from our noetic eyes rises a fount of wisdom that delights the mind. This daughter of Adam--this mindfulness of death--I always longed, as I said, to have as my, companion, to sleep with, to talk with, and to inquire from her what will happen after the body has been discarded. But unclean forgetfulness, the devil's murky daughter, has frequently prevented this.

-- St. Philotheos of Sinai (d. 10th century), Forty Texts on Watchfulness, 6
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #195 on: October 11, 2017, 08:10:09 PM »
Yet upon reaching manhood at fifteen, he decided to become a soldier of fortune. He collected a great troop of armed followers around him and, together, they ravaged the countryside, burning, raping and pillaging as they went. For nine years, Guthlac carried on with this thoughtless way of life until, one night, he had a heavenly dream that instilled him with love and compassion for his fellow man. He made an oath to dedicate his life to the service of the Lord and, in the morning, bade his companions farewell. He forsook his accumulated wealth and went off to join the dual-monastery at Repton in Derbyshire, where he received the tonsure from Abbess Aelfthrith.

After two years in the monastery, Guthlac began to long for the more secluded life of a hermit. So, having acquired leave from the monastic elders, he departed for the great Fens, north of Cambridge. Unlike the well drained arable land of today, the Fens were then a labyrinth of black wandering streams, broad lagoons and quagmires with vast beds of reeds, sedge and fern. The islands amongst this dismal swamp were a great attraction for the recluse. Guthlac was directed to a particular one of these islands by a local man named Tatwin. Many people had attempted to inhabit it before, but none had succeeded, on account of the loneliness of the wilderness and its manifold horrors. The twenty-six year old Guthlac eagerly rose to such a challenge and arrived in a little boat at his new home of the "Crow Land" on St. Bartholomew's Day. He surveyed the area a while before returning to Repton for supplies and building materials with which he returned with the help of two servants.

-- said of St. Guthlac of Crowland (d. 714), Source
« Last Edit: October 11, 2017, 08:10:26 PM by Asteriktos »
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #196 on: October 13, 2017, 07:19:12 PM »
All the passions of Christ which He bore in the head, that is in Himself, and are also borne in the members, that is in us, should therefore be borne by each of us... For in ourselves we ought to transform what we read so that, when the soul is roused by hearing, our life should cooperate to do what it hears.

-- St. Odo of Cluny (d. 942), Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #197 on: October 14, 2017, 04:44:47 PM »
It would be just to anathematize the Latins, and call them heretics. But the Orthodox Fathers have mitigated the sentence; they have only cut off and abjured the Latins, but have not openly declared them heretics, neither have they adjudged them to the same punishment with heretics.

-- Pat. Michael III of Constantinople (d. 1178), (found in: Basil Popoff, The History of the Council of Florence, p. 122 (fn 2))
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #198 on: October 15, 2017, 03:25:15 PM »
We are made clean by prayer and instructed by reading. Both are good if both can be done; if not, it is better to pray than to read. One who wishes to be always with God must frequently pray and frequently read. For when we pray, we speak with God; but when we read, God speaks with us. All progress comes from reading and meditation. For what we do not know we learn by reading; and what we have learned we preserve by means of meditation.

-- Smaragdus of Saint-Mihiel (d. 840), Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #199 on: October 16, 2017, 07:14:31 PM »
Our mind too, since it is created in the image of God, possesses the image of this highest love in the relation of the mind to the knowledge which exists perpetually from it and in it, in that this love is from it and in it and proceeds from it together with the innermost word. The insatiable desire of men for knowledge is a very clear indication of this even for those who are unable to perceive their own innermost being. But in that archetype, in that absolutely and supremely perfect goodness wherein their is no imperfection, leaving aside the being derived from it, the divine love is indistinguishably identical in every way with that of goodness.

-- St. Gregory Palamas (d. 1359), The One Hundred and Fifty Chapters, 37
« Last Edit: October 16, 2017, 07:14:45 PM by Asteriktos »
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #200 on: October 17, 2017, 03:20:13 PM »
"Christ redeemed us from the curse of the Law." (Gal. 3:13) From what curse? From the one spoken to Adam, "On whatever day you eat from it you will die" (Gen. 2:17). He redeemed us from this curse, which is to say that he called us back again to life from this death. For it was through his single death that he destroyed our double death. How did he do this? "He became a curse for us." As Saint Ambrose says, it is not that Christ himself became cursed as though he had sin. Rather, he became a curse, that is, a sacrifice offered up for the sake of the cursed and sinners, namely, for us who were bound under the curse and death of the first human being. Or perhaps it is, as Saint Augustine says, that Christ became a curse in the sense that he became mortal just as we are, although he was without sin.

"Because it is written: Cursed is everyone who hangs upon a tree." (Gal. 3:13) Euticus explains this verse in the following way. Cursed are all culpable people who hang upon a tree due to their own guilt and sin. If innocent people are hanged unjustly, however, they will not be cursed. What if Mordecai, although innocent, were hanged upon the three that Haman had prepared for him (Esth. 7:9-10); would he be cursed? Hardly. Hence, although Christ bore that curse of the passion and crucifixion and took on our sins, he was still neither cursed nor a sinner. For he accepted our sins, not that he might retain them but so that he might blot them out. As far as Jews were concerned, however, he may well have seemed cursed, that is, a sinner.

-- Haimo of Auxerre (d. 865), Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #201 on: October 18, 2017, 07:41:37 PM »
Many decades later, John Zonaras questions the dominant tropes of Byzantine historiography, both in his metahistorical statements and, occasionally, in the formation of his narrative. Let me look here at a single example of the latter. Like Theophanes the Confessor, Zonaras mentions the statue erected by Constantine while founding his new City. In Zonaras, however, Constantine's statue is not inscribed, as in Theophanes, within a narrative context of cultural competition between defeated pagan and victorious Christian signs.

While Zonaras does indeed note the Christianization of the statue (Constantine, we are told, had nails from Christ's Holy Cross hammered to the head of the statue), the twelfth-century historian exhibits this most notable sign of imperial power as an aesthetic product of the Greco-Roman past. The statue, Zonaras reports, was originally a depiction of Apollo, brought to Constantinople from Ilion, the ancestral city of ancient Rome. Most importantly, it is a statue that 'displayed the precision (akribeia) of an ancient hand that could fashion objects that are almost breathing.' Akribeia is here restored to its original Hellenistic meaning, for it refers to a principle of artistry, verisimilitude and life-likeness. As opposed to Theophanes who speaks of Constantine's statue as an andrias, Zonaras' statue of Constantine is an agalma--a term that Theophanes reserves for, e.g., the pagan statue of Aphrodite. For Zonaras, the statue is a manifestation of imperial ideology but also an object of aesthetic delight.

-- said of John Zonaras (d. 12th century), Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)

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Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Reply #202 on: Yesterday at 10:07:40 PM »
Let no one, therefore, believe, as Pelagius teaches, that he can live without sins and debts, when he sees the apostles praying earnestly for their own transgressions, as the Lord teaches. And there is also written elsewhere, "The righteous falls seven times and rises again." (Prov. 24:16) For it is impossible even for the saints to live without occasionally incurring guilt in very small sins which are committed through talk, thought, ignorance, forgetfulness, necessity, will, surprise. But still they do not cease being righteous, because with the Lord's assistance they rise again more quickly from their guilty act.

-- St. Bede the Venerable (d. 735), Source
"The bed is too short to stretch out on, the blanket too narrow to wrap around you." (Isa. 28:20)

"For because they wronged the simple, they shall be slain; and an inquisition shall ruin the ungodly." (Prov. 1:32 LXX)