Author Topic: Early Church Fathers  (Read 88410 times)

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Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #360 on: March 09, 2017, 09:02:20 PM »
To the wise man truth shines from whatsoever mouth it has issued forth.

-- St. Gildas (d. 570), Fragments From Lost Letters

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #361 on: March 11, 2017, 07:21:49 PM »
Our prayer is public and common; and when we pray, we pray not for one, but for the whole people, because we the whole people are one. The God of peace and the Teacher of concord, who taught unity, willed that one should thus pray for all, even as He Himself bore us all in one. This law of prayer the three children observed when they were shut up in the fiery furnace, speaking together in prayer, and being of one heart in the agreement of the spirit...

-- St. Cyprian of Carthage (d. 258), Treatise 4.8

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #362 on: March 13, 2017, 01:16:25 AM »
Later, as she traveled, one very hot day, Etheldreda was overpowered with fatigue. She stuck her staff into the ground and lay down to rest on the open plain. When she awoke, the staff had put forth leaves and branches, and it afterwards became a mighty oak tree, larger than any other for many miles around. At length, after many days of weary walking, the saint arrived on her own lands in Ely. Here, there was a piece of good, firm, rich land, supporting six hundred families and surrounded to a great distance by fens, forming a more formidable rampart than walls or plain water would have done.

Here, in AD 673, Etheldreda built a large double monastery. Wilfred, who never lost sight of his old friend, made her abbess and gave the veil to her first nuns. He obtained special privileges for her, from the Pope, and often visited her and helped her with advice and suggestions useful in the management of her large establishment. Etheldreda ruled over her monastery for seven years, setting a great example of piety and abstinence and all other monastic virtues. Though such a great lady, and so delicately reared, she never wore any linen, but only rough woolen clothing. She denied herself the use of the warm bath, a luxury much in use among the English in her time. Only permitting herself this indulgence at the four great festivals of the year and, even then, she only used the bath that had already served the other nuns. Many of her old friends, relations and courtiers followed her and her example.

-- Said of Saint Etheldreda of Ely (d. 679), Source

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #363 on: March 14, 2017, 03:10:01 PM »
For the son of thunder [John], the beloved of Christ, the pillar of the Churches throughout the world, who holds the keys of heaven, who drank the cup of Christ, and was baptized with His baptism, who lay upon his Master's bosom with much confidence, this man comes forward to us now... By this Apostle stand the powers from above, marveling at the beauty of his soul, and his understanding, and the bloom of that virtue by which he drew unto him Christ Himself, and obtained the grace of the Spirit. For he has made ready his soul, as some well-fashioned and jeweled lyre with strings of gold, and yielded it for the utterance of something great and sublime to the Spirit. Seeing then it is no longer the fisherman the son of Zebedee, but He who knows the deep things of God (1 Cor. 2:10), the Holy Spirit I mean, that strikes this lyre, let us hearken accordingly. For he will say nothing to us as a man, but what he says, he will say from the depths of the Spirit, from those secret things which before they came to pass the very Angels knew not; since they too have learned by the voice of John with us, and by us, the things which we know.

-- St. John Chrysostom (d. 407), Homilies on the Gospel of John, 1.2-3
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 03:10:19 PM by Asteriktos »

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #364 on: March 16, 2017, 01:34:47 AM »
The blessed Passarion, that great lover of the poor and lover of strangers, besides his other godly virtues and righteous acts, built a house for the poor outside the eastern gates of the city, for the rest and consolation of those whose bodies were wretchedly afflicted by weakness. He also erected inside the [city] walls of holy Zion [Jerusalem] a great and comely monastery for the service and for the chanting [of psalms] of those who continuously without ceasing are praising the Lord. When [Peter] saw this [foundation of Passarion's], he longed to become an imitator of this good thing.

-- Life of Peter the Iberian, 52 (5th century)

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #365 on: March 18, 2017, 01:03:32 AM »
If you refuse to accept suffering and dishonor, do not claim to be in a state of repentance because of your other virtues. For self-esteem and insensitivity can serve sin even under the cover of virtue.

-- St. Mark the Monk (d. 5th century), On Those who Think that They are Made Righteous by Works: Two Hundred and Twenty-Six Texts, 156

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #366 on: March 19, 2017, 08:58:59 PM »
Also I say that even those who are scourged in Hell are tormented with the scourgings of love. Scourgings for love's sake, namely of those who perceive that they have sinned against love, are more hard and bitter than the tortures through fear. The suffering which takes hold of the heart through the sinning against love is more acute than any other torture. It is evil for a man to think that the sinners in Hell are destitute of love for the Creator. For love is a child of true knowledge such as is professed to be given to all people. Love works with its force in a double way. It tortures those who have sinned, as happens also in the world between friends. And it gives delight to those who have kept its decrees. Thus it is also in Hell. I say that the hard tortures are grief for love. the inhabitants of heaven, however, make drunk their soul with the delight of love.

-- St. Isaac the Syrian (d. c. 700), Mystic Treatises, 27

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #367 on: Yesterday at 08:18:41 PM »
And let no one be startled at the word "creditor" (Luke 7:41). We were before under a hard creditor, who was not to be satisfied and paid to the full but by the death of the debtor. The Lord Jesus came, He saw us bound by a heavy debt. No one could pay his debt with the patrimony of his innocence. I could have nothing of my own wherewith to free myself. He gave to me a new kind of acquittance, changing my creditor because I had nothing wherewith to pay my debt. But it was sin, not nature, which had made us debtors, for we had contracted heavy debts by our sins, that we who had been free should be bound, for he is a debtor who received any of his creditor's money. Now sin is of the devil; that wicked one has, as it were, these riches in his possession. For as the riches of Christ are virtues, so crimes are the wealth of the devil.

He had reduced the human race to perpetual captivity by the heavy debt of inherited liability, which our debt-laden ancestor had transmitted to his posterity by inheritance. The Lord Jesus came, He offered His death for the death of all, He poured out His Blood for the blood of all. So, then, we have changed our creditor, not escaped wholly, or rather we have escaped, for the debt remains but the interest is cancelled, for the Lord Jesus said, "To those who are in bonds, Come out, and to those who are in prison, Go forth" (Isa. 49:9); so your sins are forgiven. All, then, are forgiven, nor is there any one whom He has not loosed. For thus it is written, that "He has forgiven all transgressions, doing away the handwriting of the ordinance that was against us" (Col. 2:13-14).

-- St. Ambrose of Milan (d. 397), Letter 41.7