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Author Topic: Former Catholics, was it tough?  (Read 1994 times) Average Rating: 0
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choy
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« on: July 16, 2012, 01:15:16 AM »

Was it tough?  I don't particularly have anything against the Catholic Church in large part that I want to leave it.  But I just find that I can grow my spirituality better in the Orthodox Church.  I'm not even decided yet that I will make that leap of faith.  I have no reason to leave the Catholic Church, although I have every reason to be in the Orthodox Church.
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« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2012, 02:39:06 AM »

For me it was a clear decision. Not sure if I can call it "easy" (in fact, I know it wasn't, but I was determined), but I knew I needed to leave Rome long before I was actually able to do so. I attended my last Mass in July 2009, but was not received into the Orthodox Church until May of this year. I would recommend to anyone wondering about making the leap to make sure that they are converting to the Church, not just away from their old church. How to do this and how tough it will be will vary by person, no doubt.

If you know you need to be Orthodox, then be Orthodox. That's its own struggle. I do not know why the Roman Catholic Church necessarily even needs to come into that. Granted, you'll have many things to learn and unlearn, but then don't we all?
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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2012, 06:34:08 AM »

Yes, to this day my family still nags me about it (despite them being truly agnostic, and Catholic in name only). In any Western European/American country it is going to be hard to be Orthodox period, because it is so "weird" compared to everything else. But you get used to it.

The more I explain Orthodoxy to them, and try to spread the truth to the world in love, the better and more kindly people react.

As for specifically the Latins out there, most of them just think it is people that like kissing icons, speaking in Greek/Russian, chanting, and married priest. They truly don't understand Orthodoxy (thanks in large part to a misconception placed by the RCC), so you can't blame them. But for the most part, Catholics are pretty nice about it. But then...you have the hardcore traditionalists, which border SSPX, they are the more offensive types and like to say very harsh things.

All in all, it isn't TOO bad, but can be difficult. Most people will just not understand (they won't be rude, they just may ask strange questions).
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« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2012, 07:55:46 PM »

These last few months have been the toughest of my life. I have been thinking about Orthodoxy on and off for about 10 years now. It is only over the last few months that I have become convinced of Her claims.

I am an SSPX, Latin Mass only traditional Catholic. My initial investigations were prompted by the liturgical and doctrinal anarchy that followed after Vatican 2. More recently I have adopted an Orthodox prayer rule and have been reading the Greek Fathers as well as books pertaining to Eastern theology. I have attended many Orthodox Divine Liturgies and Vespers over the years but was never able to "pull the trigger." I am married with several children, two of whom are old enough to practice and understand their faith. This makes my situation difficult.

Finally I have become convinced of Orthodoxy's claim to the the unchanging, Apostolic Church. After many, many hours of reading Church history from the first 1000 years of the Church I began to see Papal Infallibility, and all that flows from that, absent from the historical record. Of course once this falls the entire edifice begins to crumble.

My wife knows how I feel but I have not shared anything with my sons who are old enough to understand. Non-Catholics who were never RC cannot understand that loyalty and love for Rome that is in the very fiber of a staunch Roman Catholic. Coming to terms with certain historical and theological issues is, quite honestly, gut wrenching.

I am currently speaking to an Orthodox priest regarding next steps in the journey. Pray for me, please.
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« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2012, 09:11:20 PM »

These last few months have been the toughest of my life. I have been thinking about Orthodoxy on and off for about 10 years now. It is only over the last few months that I have become convinced of Her claims.

I am an SSPX, Latin Mass only traditional Catholic. My initial investigations were prompted by the liturgical and doctrinal anarchy that followed after Vatican 2. More recently I have adopted an Orthodox prayer rule and have been reading the Greek Fathers as well as books pertaining to Eastern theology. I have attended many Orthodox Divine Liturgies and Vespers over the years but was never able to "pull the trigger." I am married with several children, two of whom are old enough to practice and understand their faith. This makes my situation difficult.

Finally I have become convinced of Orthodoxy's claim to the the unchanging, Apostolic Church. After many, many hours of reading Church history from the first 1000 years of the Church I began to see Papal Infallibility, and all that flows from that, absent from the historical record. Of course once this falls the entire edifice begins to crumble.

My wife knows how I feel but I have not shared anything with my sons who are old enough to understand. Non-Catholics who were never RC cannot understand that loyalty and love for Rome that is in the very fiber of a staunch Roman Catholic. Coming to terms with certain historical and theological issues is, quite honestly, gut wrenching.

I am currently speaking to an Orthodox priest regarding next steps in the journey. Pray for me, please.

Prayers for you.  I think not only RC's but also anyone who was truly invested in their tradition and had long family history within that tradition. I'm thinking specifically of cradle Lutherans who convert but I'm sure there are others whose very fiber breathed that tradition.  I can feel the sadness in your post.
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« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2012, 10:11:07 PM »

These last few months have been the toughest of my life. I have been thinking about Orthodoxy on and off for about 10 years now. It is only over the last few months that I have become convinced of Her claims.

I am an SSPX, Latin Mass only traditional Catholic. My initial investigations were prompted by the liturgical and doctrinal anarchy that followed after Vatican 2. More recently I have adopted an Orthodox prayer rule and have been reading the Greek Fathers as well as books pertaining to Eastern theology. I have attended many Orthodox Divine Liturgies and Vespers over the years but was never able to "pull the trigger." I am married with several children, two of whom are old enough to practice and understand their faith. This makes my situation difficult.

Finally I have become convinced of Orthodoxy's claim to the the unchanging, Apostolic Church. After many, many hours of reading Church history from the first 1000 years of the Church I began to see Papal Infallibility, and all that flows from that, absent from the historical record. Of course once this falls the entire edifice begins to crumble.

My wife knows how I feel but I have not shared anything with my sons who are old enough to understand. Non-Catholics who were never RC cannot understand that loyalty and love for Rome that is in the very fiber of a staunch Roman Catholic. Coming to terms with certain historical and theological issues is, quite honestly, gut wrenching.

I am currently speaking to an Orthodox priest regarding next steps in the journey. Pray for me, please.

Prayers for you.  I think not only RC's but also anyone who was truly invested in their tradition and had long family history within that tradition. I'm thinking specifically of cradle Lutherans who convert but I'm sure there are others whose very fiber breathed that tradition.  I can feel the sadness in your post.

Religions that make exclusive truth claims tend to be the ones that are more difficult to leave behind. I have a lot of friend who are former Episcopalians who had no difficulty transitioning to another faith, but imy Mormon, Muslim, and Catholic friends that were raised in devout families have a difficult time leaving that identity behind.
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choy
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« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2012, 12:12:12 AM »

The most difficult part is the bond you have with your family through your faith.  We just recently celebrated the baptism/chrismation of my second child and my sister is the godmother.  My other sister is the godmother of my older child.  We're young enough to have another child or two.  If we become Orthodox we won't have that.  I know, the truth should prevail over family bond.  But I get sad just thinking about it, and it forms a huge part of my apprehension.
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« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2012, 01:22:15 AM »

Non-Catholics who were never RC cannot understand that loyalty and love for Rome that is in the very fiber of a staunch Roman Catholic. Coming to terms with certain historical and theological issues is, quite honestly, gut wrenching.

I am currently speaking to an Orthodox priest regarding next steps in the journey. Pray for me, please.

I have a close friend who followed a very similar route to yours: Traditional RC, SSPX, and after a lengthy and deep study, moved to Orthodoxy.  While he is certain that his decision was the right one, the ordeal was, as you put it, gut wrenching.  Not only did he strain familial ties, but he fought with questions of identity and loyalty.  Having never been a Roman Catholic, I can't claim to understand. Yet I've seen how difficult it can be.

Praying for you!
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« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2012, 08:59:41 AM »

I am an SSPX, Latin Mass only traditional Catholic. My initial investigations were prompted by the liturgical and doctrinal anarchy that followed after Vatican 2. More recently I have adopted an Orthodox prayer rule and have been reading the Greek Fathers as well as books pertaining to Eastern theology. I have attended many Orthodox Divine Liturgies and Vespers over the years but was never able to "pull the trigger." I am married with several children, two of whom are old enough to practice and understand their faith. This makes my situation difficult.

SNIP

I will finally come out of lurking to say that this is somewhat similar to where I'm at.  Although I don't attend an SSPX Chapel (due to the nearest one being 3 hours roundtrip away), I am a "traditional Catholic."  I converted to Catholicism from atheism a little over 4 years ago at a pretty conservative parish.  My wife then converted from Methodism the next year.  

Our local Catholic parish started having a monthly Latin Mass around the time I converted.  After experiencing the traditional liturgy, I was confused: I started to investigate what happened and why the Church seemed to have changed so much.  In addition to drastic liturgical change, I then “discovered” quite a few apparent inconstancies in doctrine since Vatican II (I have occasion to study the faith quite a bit because I assist in the parish by teaching portions of the RCIA class).  Those inconsistencies coupled with what can only be described as the Church’s self-destructing from a liturgical perspective have led me to be somewhat skeptical of a Church hierarchy that appears content to sit back and watch itself implode.  That, in turn, has led to a bit of an analysis of the claims made by the Catholic Church...

In the meantime, I went to the Divine Liturgy at a nearby OCA parish out of curiosity (because I enjoy studying liturgical history).  I was really blown away by the experience, including the people and the priest.  I haven’t been back to the OCA parish because I really felt quite guilty about going to their liturgy even while I was there – those Catholics who have read Mortalium Animos might understand why!

I also have my wife to consider – she attends daily Mass and we are really involved in our parish and friends with quite a few priests and sisters.  There is also that part of my mind that makes me concerned to the point of anxiety about which is the “true” Church.  Honestly, the beautiful liturgy (and the fact that the Orthodox don’t seem intent on “modernizing” or giving in to modernism in general gives me quite a bit of confidence in that Church).  But, despite being Catholic only just over 4 years, I have quite a bit of hesitation about leaving the Church.  In the face of all that, I still feel pulled to Orthodoxy!  

I have been thinking of contacting the Orthodox priest just to talk to him about all this, but when I initially tried, his email wasn’t working (which of course I interpreted as a sign to back off – but it could also be interpreted that I need to persevere).  

Sounds like there are quite a few of us Catholics wrestling with this – I will pray for you all!  Please pray for me.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2012, 09:00:44 AM by ErmyCath » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2012, 04:30:32 PM »

For me, my conversion to the Orthodox Church wasn't very tough but, more or less, I eased my way into the Church.  I was raised a NO Roman Catholic.  Before I left the RC Church, I usually went to the Traditional Latin Mass (TLM) that was either approved by the Archdiocese or attended the local SSPX Chapel.  The TLM resonated more with me than the NO.  After doing that for several years, I started attending a Ruthenian Byzantine Catholic Church.  I fell in love with the Liturgy.  I also did a lot of reading on Eastern Theology, etc.  

Eventually, my wife and I decided to visit an Orthodox Church just down the street from the BCC we were attending.  Three months after that first visit my family and I were received into the Orthodox Church.  We felt as if we found the Church we always wanted to attend.  Please keep in mind that this is a very simplified narrative of what happened.  But we are happy with our decision and have no regrets.  

We had no problems with our respective families either concerning our conversion, either. My wife's mother and sister are still Roman Catholic but don't practice their faith.  My father is a non-practicing Lutheran so it didn't matter to him.  My mother, who is a practicing Roman Catholic, was fine with our conversion too because at least we were still going to church.
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ErmyCath
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« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2012, 06:37:52 PM »

Not to derail, but:

Personna, with your background, I'm curious if you have any recommended reading on the "hot button" issues for Catholics looking into Orthodoxy, especially papal infallibility.  Thanks!

(Any responses or PMs on this appreciated.)
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« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2012, 09:39:32 PM »

Not to derail, but:

Personna, with your background, I'm curious if you have any recommended reading on the "hot button" issues for Catholics looking into Orthodoxy, especially papal infallibility.  Thanks!

(Any responses or PMs on this appreciated.)

I know this wasn't addressed to me, but I can tell you my personal opinion as a traditional Roman Catholic too.

I'm currently reading The Truth: What every Roman Catholic should know about the Orthodox Church. The author seems to hate the Roman Catholic Church, but he otherwise does good research.
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« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2012, 09:46:32 PM »

Thank you!  I meant to say that I hoped anyone with suggestions would reply: so I'm glad you did. I've already pulled your suggestion up on Amazon! 
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« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2012, 11:23:53 PM »

Not to derail, but:

Personna, with your background, I'm curious if you have any recommended reading on the "hot button" issues for Catholics looking into Orthodoxy, especially papal infallibility.  Thanks!

(Any responses or PMs on this appreciated.)

I know this wasn't addressed to me, but I can tell you my personal opinion as a traditional Roman Catholic too.

I'm currently reading The Truth: What every Roman Catholic should know about the Orthodox Church. The author seems to hate the Roman Catholic Church, but he otherwise does good research.


Yeah I typically don't like to recommend that book. It's too polemical and can turn people off in my opinion. I recommend Popes and Patriarchs by Michael Whelton. It's easy to read and gives great info on the ecumenical councils. It also deals with Satis Cognitum and many patristic quotes that are typically used by Roman Catholics.
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« Reply #14 on: July 21, 2012, 11:34:08 PM »

I have no reason to leave the Catholic Church, although I have every reason to be in the Orthodox Church.

This is only true if you equate the Vatican confession with "the Catholic Church."   From an Orthodox perspective, you would be entering the Catholic Church. 
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« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2012, 12:57:42 AM »

I have no reason to leave the Catholic Church, although I have every reason to be in the Orthodox Church.

This is only true if you equate the Vatican confession with "the Catholic Church."   From an Orthodox perspective, you would be entering the Catholic Church. 

I know.  I mean, its hard to maneuver the semantics here.  The Catholic Church (ie. Roman Catholic Church) would also say they are Orthodox.  I guess the solution I have come across is how the letters are capitalized.  Big C Catholic is a noun which refers to Churches in communion with the Pope of Rome.  And big O Orthodox are those who are in communion with Constantinople.
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« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2012, 01:06:52 AM »

I've led a blessed life. The only thing harder for me than leaving the Roman Catholic Church was burying my Grandmother. Whether that speaks to the difficulty in leaving that church or the ease in which I've lived I don't know. I broke down over the idea in a parking lot for cripes sake. I told someone (can't recall who) that it felt like someone had died, or that I was getting a divorce.

I was a Traditional, Latin Mass attending RC. Seeing that the church wasn't what I thought it was and seeing what it could have been, and should have been, was horrible. It was difficult. I actually thought, when I became Orthodox, that I would never love the Orthodox Church as much as I loved the Roman Catholic. I was wrong actually, and I love her more than I ever loved Roman Catholicism.

Roman Catholics, themselves not their church, cured me of most of my lingering affection for my former tradition soon after my conversion. It's slowly returned as most RC's I meet nowadays don't have any idea I was ever one of them. Nothing turns some people into sharks faster than the idea that you're leaving their church apparently, so be prepared, possibly, to be told you never were a 'proper' Roman Catholic, that you were too stupid to understand it or you would never have left, and to be told condescendingly that perhaps maybe if you were just stupid enough you might not wind up in hell.
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« Reply #17 on: July 24, 2012, 02:24:17 AM »

I've led a blessed life. The only thing harder for me than leaving the Roman Catholic Church was burying my Grandmother. Whether that speaks to the difficulty in leaving that church or the ease in which I've lived I don't know. I broke down over the idea in a parking lot for cripes sake. I told someone (can't recall who) that it felt like someone had died, or that I was getting a divorce.

I was a Traditional, Latin Mass attending RC. Seeing that the church wasn't what I thought it was and seeing what it could have been, and should have been, was horrible. It was difficult. I actually thought, when I became Orthodox, that I would never love the Orthodox Church as much as I loved the Roman Catholic. I was wrong actually, and I love her more than I ever loved Roman Catholicism.

Roman Catholics, themselves not their church, cured me of most of my lingering affection for my former tradition soon after my conversion. It's slowly returned as most RC's I meet nowadays don't have any idea I was ever one of them. Nothing turns some people into sharks faster than the idea that you're leaving their church apparently, so be prepared, possibly, to be told you never were a 'proper' Roman Catholic, that you were too stupid to understand it or you would never have left, and to be told condescendingly that perhaps maybe if you were just stupid enough you might not wind up in hell.

Wonderful, thank you for sharing.  True enough someone who I respect regarding spiritual matters is telling me I am a heretic if I leave the Church.  Certainly these things are at the back of my mind.  What if I am wrong and they are right?  It is hard knowing that your salvation is at stake here.
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« Reply #18 on: July 24, 2012, 02:41:58 AM »

I've gotten all those criticisms mentioned by Joseph Hazen from various people, and some that are probably unique to Coptic converts (that I converted because of some kind of Arabic/Middle Eastern fetish... Roll Eyes Funny, since the one year of Arabic I took in college, because it was required to graduate, was when I was still Roman Catholic...oops).

The key, I think, is to be convinced of your decision on its own merits (i.e., on the strength of Orthodoxy in itself), and not relative to the claims of others who aren't you. It's easier said than done, of course, but com'on...you are the one who has to live with your decision, not your critics. Also, when you are learning so much about Orthodoxy, which is so different from RC spirituality, there is enough to do without worrying about what RC 'friends' might say. Keep the Hours, attend liturgy and vespers, go to Bible studies if you're lucky enough to have them, fast and pray...do all those things to even a decent degree and you'll soon find you have very little time to worry what another church that you're not even in communion with has to say about your decision. (Not to mention the fact that modern RC documents do not mention anything about Orthodox being damned or anything like that, as far as I can remember.)
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« Reply #19 on: July 24, 2012, 02:51:46 AM »

I've gotten all those criticisms mentioned by Joseph Hazen from various people, and some that are probably unique to Coptic converts (that I converted because of some kind of Arabic/Middle Eastern fetish... Roll Eyes Funny, since the one year of Arabic I took in college, because it was required to graduate, was when I was still Roman Catholic...oops).

LoL, that's right I forgot about being told I just hated my heritage or culture or something, or I was turning my back on it. Dzheremi and I actually converted around the same time, and were pretty open about it on the same forum (doubt you remember me though, and I went by a different user name then anyway)

At any rate, I was told by someone much wiser than myself (not saying much I suppose lol) to trust my salvation to God, not to a church just now, and God would lead me to the Church that would lead me to my salvation. At times that was frustrating, but the relief of relying solely on Christ instead of investigating one church while practicing in another was nice. I don't know if that idea will help you any, or if I'm really explaining right what the person meant/how it influenced me. Not trusting the church probably sounds kind of odd.
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« Reply #20 on: July 24, 2012, 11:22:15 AM »

Oh, I can relate with that.  My ethnic background is one that is staunchly Catholic.  For sure I'll be seen as a Protestant because I am not Roman Catholic.
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« Reply #21 on: July 24, 2012, 12:00:50 PM »


Dear choy,

I'd be concerned if anyone, Catholic, Orthodox, or anything else, told me my salvation was "at stake" if I did not attend a particular church (presumably the one they are in).   I'd also be concerned if anyone told me my salvation was guaranteed by attending a particular church (presumably the one they are in).

love, elephant
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« Reply #22 on: July 24, 2012, 01:31:50 PM »


Dear choy,

I'd be concerned if anyone, Catholic, Orthodox, or anything else, told me my salvation was "at stake" if I did not attend a particular church (presumably the one they are in).   I'd also be concerned if anyone told me my salvation was guaranteed by attending a particular church (presumably the one they are in).

love, elephant


+1
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« Reply #23 on: July 24, 2012, 01:37:03 PM »

Yes it can be tough. Sometimes I'll read Catholic theology or think about western style liturgy and yearn for my Roman heritage. Then I go to a Novus Ordo Mass and the desire evaporates immediately.
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« Reply #24 on: July 24, 2012, 03:09:34 PM »

Wonderful, thank you for sharing.  True enough someone who I respect regarding spiritual matters is telling me I am a heretic if I leave the Church.  Certainly these things are at the back of my mind.  What if I am wrong and they are right?  It is hard knowing that your salvation is at stake here.

Well, I was recently called a heretic and a schismatic by a RC priest for comments I posted on my pastor's blog.  The problem with that is that Catholics cannot even agree on what the RC Church is teaching on particular subjects these days.  As someone mentioned previously, the RC Church (in the new Catechism) has apparently stopped teaching that the Orthodox are outside "the Church."  That is pretty much a 180 degree turnaround from prior teaching. 

The lack of consistency in doctrine over time (that is, the favoring of the new over the old) is personally causing me quite a bit of heartache and spiritual anxiety with the RC Church right now. 

Perhaps those who were also Traditionalist Catholics prior to converting to Orthodoxy can sympathize with the situation one has when one begins to see that perhaps the RC Church has indeed "changed" dogmas over time -- it causes a huge logical problem in the scheme of RC theology...  The best example of this is the overhaul of the Liturgy that others have mentioned here.
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« Reply #25 on: July 24, 2012, 09:26:13 PM »

I have no reason to leave the Catholic Church, although I have every reason to be in the Orthodox Church.

This is only true if you equate the Vatican confession with "the Catholic Church."

Your fellow Orthodox have told us not to use "Roman Catholic", or at any rate not to include Eastern Catholics in that designation.
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« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2012, 09:39:03 PM »

How does that relate to anything, Peter J?
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« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2012, 10:55:48 PM »

I'm not going to try to explain to you how it relates, but I'll tell you what it relates to: us calling ourselves the Catholic Church. Which I'm pretty sure you already knew, but you just don't have anything better to do with your time.
 
You are receiving this warning to last for 7 days for trying to stir up a feud on Convert Issues with your petty nitpicking. This quibbling is particularly unwelcome here since it has to do with an issue of importance to you as a Roman Catholic, thus making your contention inappropriate for this section of the forum. If you feel that this action is wrong, please appeal it to me via private message.

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« Reply #28 on: July 24, 2012, 11:20:39 PM »

Good thing we're on a moderated forum, Peter, where I can't give that kind of answer to a simple question the response it very much deserves.
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Shiranui117
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« Reply #29 on: July 25, 2012, 02:56:14 PM »

For me, it was certainly very tough. I felt like it was "wrong" or "improper" to have started thinking about converting to Orthodoxy right after I'd been confirmed as a Catholic. Heck, the seed had been planted in my head and my heart even before I'd officially completed my conversion to the Catholic Church. Because of that guilt and the thought of shame looming over my head because of my hastiness, I dragged my feet and went around in circles. A lot.

Over the past 2 years, first I became disenchanted with the NO Mass, so I went to a Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy, which met my spiritual needs MUCH better. There was home. There was the spirituality I had so badly needed and searched for. With time, I became an altar server at my EC parish. When I heard about an ACROD mission very close to me a year and a half ago, I began popping in there for Saturday evening Vespers and the rare Liturgy, and I felt at home there as well. As I started to learn more about Byzantine Catholic/Eastern Orthodox spirituality (oftentimes having Orthodox books recommended to me by my EC priest and deacon) as well as the Roman Catholic dogmas to which I was supposed to hold, I found a chasm between the two.

I looked for all the ways possible to reconcile RC dogma and Eastern Catholic/Orthodox spirituality, but ultimately, much to my dismay, I could not reconcile them. I had to choose one or the other. And I could not choose against the Byzantine spirituality that had nourished me and grown my faith. Roman Catholicism became dead to me. I even became unsure of the validity of Roman sacraments, between the hollow NO Mass and the Latin dogmas that now seemed alien and confusing to me. And if I was to question Roman Catholicism's sacraments and dogmas, I logically had to question the validity of the Eucharist at my BCC parish, for which I still served the altar. Let me tell you, questioning the validity of the Eucharist you receive, while serving the altar upon which that Eucharist is prepared and consecrated, is a killer in every way. I should have stopped altar serving right when I began having that doubt, but for the most part, I was able to shove it aside for Sunday morning.

I'd grown very attached to my local Byzantine Catholic parish, and I thought people there would react badly to me leaving, especially so soon, like I hadn't even given Catholicism a chance. Ultimately, though, I had to be honest with myself about what I believed. It took me a while to work up the guts to tell my Byzantine Catholic priest about my decision. But when I did stop altar serving and tell him about my decision to explore Orthodoxy, instead of not understanding or being upset, he was incredibly compassionate, knew where I was coming from, offered me some things to keep in mind while I inquire into the Orthodox Church, and encouraged me to come back and visit once in a while.

So I guess my advice is, be honest with yourself, make sure Orthodoxy is what you need, and don't be afraid to be honest with others.
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katherineofdixie
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« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2012, 04:00:25 PM »

Nothing turns some people into sharks faster than the idea that you're leaving their church apparently, so be prepared, possibly, to be told you never were a 'proper' Roman Catholic, that you were too stupid to understand it or you would never have left, and to be told condescendingly that perhaps maybe if you were just stupid enough you might not wind up in hell.

My former "friends" at my former Lutheran church were kinder - they just made fun of Orthodoxy and asked me why I was so angry at the Lutheran church. Oh, one of my closest friends did say (with a barely concealed sneer) that is must be comforting to have a church make all your decisions for you. (I mean, huh...?)
None of them, btw, have stayed in contact with me.

But to answer the OP, my husband, born and raised Irish Catholic, said that in Orthodoxy he felt like he had found the real Catholic Church. FWIW. But it was difficult to explain to his family. They just don't mention it.
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« Reply #31 on: July 25, 2012, 05:28:50 PM »

I have no reason to leave the Catholic Church, although I have every reason to be in the Orthodox Church.

This is only true if you equate the Vatican confession with "the Catholic Church."

Your fellow Orthodox have told us not to use "Roman Catholic", or at any rate not to include Eastern Catholics in that designation.

On this forum?  Vatican I specifically states that adherents of any rite are "Roman Catholic," regardless of rite, specifically stating that the "Roman" refers to being under the Church headed on earth by the occupant of the See of Rome, not just to those who practice the roman rite. 
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« Reply #32 on: July 25, 2012, 07:02:48 PM »

I have no reason to leave the Catholic Church, although I have every reason to be in the Orthodox Church.

This is only true if you equate the Vatican confession with "the Catholic Church."

Your fellow Orthodox have told us not to use "Roman Catholic", or at any rate not to include Eastern Catholics in that designation.

On this forum?  Vatican I specifically states that adherents of any rite are "Roman Catholic," regardless of rite, specifically stating that the "Roman" refers to being under the Church headed on earth by the occupant of the See of Rome, not just to those who practice the roman rite. 

Where can I find this?
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« Reply #33 on: July 26, 2012, 01:07:09 AM »

So that we derail this thread no further, here you go:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,46043.msg782634.html#msg782634

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Melesine
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« Reply #34 on: July 28, 2012, 01:55:31 PM »

I'm still Catholic but have felt pulled to Orthodoxy for a long time, even before I was received into the RCC. In fact while I was in RCIA I quit for about 6 weeks because I felt I should become Orthodox instead. In the end I think I gave in and became RC because I was driving my husband so crazy with comparative theology questions he was ready to throw in the towel on both, and I was so close to finally getting baptized and the desire for that was so strong I couldn't deny myself that any longer.

I'm also a TLM person and attended SSPX chapels prior to being baptized and was received into the RCC at parish with EF. The Orthodox Church by Ware was where I started learning but what really convinced me has been Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy by Fr Damick. I've also read McGuckin's The Orthodox Church and Light from the Christian East by Payton, along with The Living God and The Incarnate God sets ( ok I haven't finished those yet).

We have a wonderful Orthodox community that my husband and I have attended DL at off and on for over 6 months, but sadly we have to move 4 hours away due to my husbands job.
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DanM
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« Reply #35 on: August 08, 2012, 02:10:37 PM »

Was it tough?

I was raised Mainline/Evangelical, then was Catholic for five years.  Even though I was APPALLED at everything I saw, heard and experienced in the RCC (even without having experienced pre-Vatican II Catholicism, even though I had seen quite enough in Protestant and Evangelical worlds), it was still enormously difficult to make the break.  Being snooty about having to associate with the detritus of the Austro-Hungarian empire didn't make it any easier.  Still, when I did make the break, it took.  I cannot believe that Vladimir's legates felt any better than I did when I attended my first Divine Liturgy, and I still am ecstatic about being at the liturgy.  If you succeed in making the break, you will realize what Vergil meant when he said sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt (roughly, "there are tears to be shed for misfortunes and mortal things move the mind"), but in time you will be blessed a hundred fold--just as Our Lord promised.  You cannot now have any conception of what that means.
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Tikhon.of.Colorado
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« Reply #36 on: August 12, 2012, 05:52:42 PM »

First of all, I should state that I was not formally a Roman Catholic.  I wanted to convert, but I was 14 and my mother wouldn't hear of it.  I did go to mass many times, both alone and with my grandmother.  I grew to love the Catholic Church.

It was very difficult.  There are times even now that I wonder if I made the right decision.  I could be a Roman Catholic right now.  I could be attending a quick mass every day before school.  I would finally fit in with my father's family, who rejected my family because we were Protestants.  Also, my heritage lies in very Catholic countries, and being Catholic would make it easier to relate to that. 

I always wonder what it would be like.  I get this sense of not being fulfilled because I have not become Roman Catholic, something I promised myself I'd do when I was very little.

The services of the Orthodox Church are beautiful.  They have ancient elements that have been abandoned by the west.  But still, I miss the services that mystified me when I was little.

The Orthodox Church is beautiful and wonderful and all around fantastic as Churches go.

Make certain that when you enter an Orthodox Church, hear the chants and smell the incense, your heart feels as though it's stepped into it's eternal home.  If you rush into it, you'll regret it after a while.  
« Last Edit: August 12, 2012, 05:58:42 PM by trevor72694 » Logged

"It is true that I am not always faithful, but I never lose courage, I leave myself in the Arms of Our Lord." - St. Thérèse of Lisieux
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« Reply #37 on: August 22, 2012, 01:39:50 PM »

For me, it isn't really tough. Most of what Orthodox believe in, Catholics believe in. The transition isn't that much, at least in general. What was tough wasn't making the jump itself, but making the decision to jump. But once that decision was made and resolve was there, it was surprisingly easy.
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