Author Topic: Christianity - cognitive dissonance  (Read 869 times)

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Offline jaroslavkourakin

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Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« on: June 22, 2012, 12:47:12 AM »
Why is it that people seem to have no problem with saying God is forgiving, and yet Jesus died to bear the wrath of God?

Otherwise, what is the orthodox explanation of "Christ died for our sins according to Scripture", and I suppose he means Isaiah 53 which definitely does seem very punitive at the hands of God?
« Last Edit: June 22, 2012, 12:47:38 AM by jaroslavkourakin »

Offline HouseOfGod

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2012, 12:51:20 AM »
I'm sure witega has a perfectly clear explanation of this sort of topic, and mine I could write, but it would probably get confusing and not include everything I want it to include. I'll try to contribute what I can, though.  ;)
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Offline Shiny

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2012, 01:28:32 AM »
I hope the answer is delivered in the way of a Bible cookie. Over excrement.
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Offline JamesRottnek

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2012, 01:56:50 AM »
Why is it that people seem to have no problem with saying God is forgiving, and yet Jesus died to bear the wrath of God?

Otherwise, what is the orthodox explanation of "Christ died for our sins according to Scripture", and I suppose he means Isaiah 53 which definitely does seem very punitive at the hands of God?

The standard answer is probably that the death of Christ was necessary for death to be abolished, and death was the result of our sins.

I've also heard, interestingly enough on this matter, something to the effect that the Word became Man and suffered and died and was buried, because His actions set in motion our suffering (it's been a while, so I don't recall precisely where I heard or read this, and I may not be portraying it quite correctly; as I recall, it was either in the work of some saint or another, or someone's interpretation of that work).
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Offline jnorm888

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2012, 09:33:20 AM »
Why is it that people seem to have no problem with saying God is forgiving, and yet Jesus died to bear the wrath of God?

Otherwise, what is the orthodox explanation of "Christ died for our sins according to Scripture", and I suppose he means Isaiah 53 which definitely does seem very punitive at the hands of God?

Read this:
http://orthodox-apologetics.blogspot.com/2011/02/propitiation-or-expiation-in-saint-paul.html (Propitiation or Expiation in Saint Paul)
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Offline Schultz

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2012, 09:36:04 AM »
He's baaaaa-aaaaaack.
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Offline Azul

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2012, 11:00:51 AM »
Don`t think of God as an infinite offended God as fundamental christianity portraits Him. Don`t overload your conscience with sentiments of guilt and fear.. The Torah, the Bible, the prophets, the priests, JESUS and the Church are all helpers in our quest for God and happiness.. God is Love according to the Bible , so everything he provided , he did not do it so for our judgement but for our good.. The focuss and emphasis must not be so much on Christ's death which is a negative event but on his life and his teaching.. That if you are honest, good , smart, reasonable, just, kind and faithfull as in being capable to die for your ideals good things will happen to you.. You just need to fight for them, make some sacrifices and keep your faith, even in times of perril and unjustice when all seems to go down the pit.Keep your faith and you will be rewarded 100xtimes more.. All this things are for your good, for your development.. stages for your maturization in the process of becoming one with pure Reason(Logos).In any situations don`t lost hope and if you do good good you receive.

« Last Edit: June 22, 2012, 11:02:46 AM by Azul »
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Offline IoanC

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2012, 11:06:25 AM »
Christ died for our sins means that He, being sinless, died in order to show us that our sins are not in the way of His love, that being sinless did not prevent Him to die for sinful people, to the contrary, He even loved dying for us. This showing of His infinite love is what heals us form the wounds of our sins, this is what it means that "He died for our sins", He died to heal us. Though, it was a big price to pay so to speak, only His Sacrifice could have truly healed us, but this again, is a way to phrase things, a different angle, but in no way does it diminish His Love, to the contrary, it proves it. Otherwise, there's no way to not mentioned our sins, for if you don't mention the illness, you cannot cure it.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2012, 11:11:40 AM by IoanC »

Online ialmisry

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2012, 11:35:15 AM »
A friend of mine worked as a nurse in a burn unit.  One time they had a horribly burned man who had to have his muscles stretched, then grafted, stretched, then grafted.... in order to get the minimum of use of his body.  How he got that way was that he was the father of eight children, whose house burnt down.  Before the firemen arrived (basically to just extinguish the remaining embers, all that was left), he went into the house repeatedly and dug his children out of the inferno.  The children all came out with relatively minor burns.

We have a God who did the same.
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Offline alanscott

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2012, 01:41:08 PM »
A friend of mine worked as a nurse in a burn unit.  One time they had a horribly burned man who had to have his muscles stretched, then grafted, stretched, then grafted.... in order to get the minimum of use of his body.  How he got that way was that he was the father of eight children, whose house burnt down.  Before the firemen arrived (basically to just extinguish the remaining embers, all that was left), he went into the house repeatedly and dug his children out of the inferno.  The children all came out with relatively minor burns.

We have a God who did the same.


Copied, printed, taking it home to share with family.

Awesome post!
There are heathens that live with more virtue than I. The devil himself believes Jesus Christ is the Son of God. Neither of these things truly makes me Christian.

Offline wayseer

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Re: Christianity - cognitive dissonance
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2012, 07:26:49 PM »

Awesome post!

Agreed.  The point is - it does not matter who, or what, started the fire.
Not all those who wander are lost.