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Author Topic: Mormon to Othodoxy converts share your conversion stories  (Read 1709 times) Average Rating: 0
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soderquj
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« on: June 01, 2012, 11:55:07 AM »

I see other conversion stories and I thought it would be good to see if our members who are converts from
Mormonism would post their stories.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2012, 12:06:04 PM by soderquj » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2012, 11:57:48 AM »


I was born in 1957 and raised as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon). When I was little I remember attending church allot. I attended Sunday school and the main church meeting. I remember doing all the activities, plays, dances, cook outs, boy scouts, and many other things associated with the church. Like all Mormons I was taught from the book of Mormon every Sunday and had a good understanding of the things presented to a young person. 

At some point I remember getting a little green covered bible and reading it. After reading the bible and listening to my Sunday school teachers I started asking questions.  I cannot remember the exact things I questions (should have started a diary but didn’t) but I know that the answers did not sit well with me. They either did not answer the question or was told that that was not important. I started to have reservations that later in life developed into doubts. During this time we started to not go to church as often, I do not know why, but still went on a fairly regular basis.

The families that live in our neighborhood were mostly Mormon, however we had one Catholic family and I think one that was some form of evangelical.  All the kids got along really well, at least to me there was no religious tension, and I had no restriction placed on us to not associate with non Mormons. I knew several kids who were not allowed to play with non Mormons and I found this wrong.

It was sometime in my early teens that I started to really questioning the teachings of the Mormon Church. I remember while attending Sunday school thinking, I have heard this same thing every year over and over. I felt I was being brainwashed and I did not like it. There were many things that after reading the bible I could not square with those things I was being taught. I started to not want to attend church and resisted when asked. After a while my parents did not try to  force me to go but let me decide, which became not often and finally never.  It was during my junior high school years that really planted my rejection of Mormonism.

In Utah you are allowed to take LDS seminary as an elective and therefore it was used by a lot of us to not have to take a harder class. It was in this class (the only one I attended) that I came to the conclusion that the teaching of the church was wrong.  The teacher when pressed would tell us that the subject in discussion, had been determined by a Church Prophet, and that was that. There was not room for contrary opinion or thought.  This really did not sit well with me.  My parents had always encourage us to question everything, which now that I look back on I did quite often. I sometimes questioned the definitions of God I encountered but never stopped believing in a Him.

I ended up rejecting the Mormon Church and any Idea of any organized religion. I felt that any religion run by Men was not going to be correct. I still believed in God, the bible, and family. I just did not feel I needed anything else.

I had read a book on North American Indian spirituality (Seven Arrows) and felt that they had a good understanding of things. It showed their belief in a higher spirit and how life’s journey, (the medicine wheel) was a guide to reaching full spiritual awareness. This was what I was feeling and I it had a great impact on my outlook and mindset. 

I continued in this manner until I graduated from High school. At that time I decided to join the Navy. When entering in the Navy you are asked to state your religious orientation, I selected none. During boot camp I looked into other religions to just see what it was all about.  I look at the Catholic Church, did not like the thought of the Pope who decides doctrine, been there done that. A few evangelical faiths, did not like the instruments and always different views on everything, and decided to not participate in anything.  

All this time I still felt God was with me. I believed and He watched over me, we were good.

While serving on an aircraft carrier I developed a back condition that is still with me to this day. This condition would prevent me from finishing my tour of duty and resulted in my being honorably discharged from the Navy.

Upon returning home I entered College in my home town. I don’t remember going to any Church during this time and did not feel that I needed to.  None of my friends were very religious and it just did not seem important. I still was where I wanted to be. God and I were still good.

It was in college that I met my future bride and best friend. We had gone to school together, (junior and senior high school), and in my senior year I almost asked her out but did not have the nerve. She was working in the college cafeteria and I used to go there to study after classes. We would talk and she would on occasion take a break and sit with me. I finally asked her out and we began dating. 

Religion really never came up and we never really discussed it in any depth. She knew I was raised Mormon and that I did not believe in it any longer, other than that it was not on our radar. It did not even occur to me to find out what religion she was. It finally came up when we decided to get married.

I discovered she was Orthodox and it was very important to her that we get married in her church. Seeing as I did not care one way or another that was fine with me.  We arranged a meeting with her priest to find out what was needed to be done so we could get married in the Orthodox Church. It was during these meeting that we were informed that my baptism in the Mormon Church was not recognized as valid by the Orthodox. 

This really did not surprise me as I knew that the Mormon beliefs were really different from that of the mainstream Christian community.  During this time the priest gave me material to read to see if I was ready to enter into Orthodoxy. I read the material given and found that everything I read was what I already believed. 

God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit were one God, in Mormonism each is a separate being and not God. The bread and wine were the body of Christ, in Mormonism it was a symbol and a renewal of your commitments. Baptism is the putting on Christ and removing you sins, in Mormonism baptism does remove sin and is a requirement to get into heaven, which is why they baptize dead people. This practice has always seem to be wrong to me seeing that when you are alive you make the decision on what you believe and the bible says once you are gone it’s over.  There were other things but you get my drift.

After a few discussions the priest determined that I could be baptized into the Orthodox Church. The church where I was to be baptized had a large metal box for its adult baptismal font.  As most know during an Orthodox baptism the person is anointed with oil before emersion and the water blessed also with oil. After the third emersion the priest asked me to standup. To my chagrin I was so oiled up that each time I tried to stand up I slid and went under again. After the numerous times the priest reached in and helped me to stand telling me that that was enough emersions and I was good to go.

The service was awesome and I felt very much renewed and new.  

We proceeded to get married. The wedding service had a major impact on me. The service was not us getting just getting married but God uniting us into one with him. The emphasis is on becoming one, self sacrifice to the other, as Christ sacrificed himself for the church. That has stayed with me to this date.

After this we began attending services. The church services were mainly in Greek therefore I read along in the book which had both Greek and English. I found that I was comfortable but not really involved in the worship.  Attending  Paschal services, so much different from my youth (did not really have a true paschal service). I was really taken with the beauty and majesty of Holy Week.

After our first child we began getting more involved, teaching Sunday school and participating in the yearly festival.  We were good, comfortable. This situation remained for a number of years and two priests.

Things changed when we got a new priest. He made some amazing changes that were not immediately accepted. Services were now mostly in English.  Bibles were placed in the pews, bible study and classes.  He had classes on the history of salvation and the ecumenical councils. He requested everyone sing, to participate, to actively join the worship and get involved. Wow what a difference this had on me. Now I started to see what a treasure I had been given. What a pearl of great price this was. 

This man changed me forever, I was no longer just there, I was involved. 

He taught me that communion was not something you did every so often but should be done as much as possible as long as you were good with God. I participated in my first sacrament of confession with him. Confession really had not been made a priority to me before and I never really thought a lot about it. I knew we had the sacrament but I thought it was enough after baptism that unless you did something really bad you were ok. He taught me that as we get closer to the light we begin to see all the little marks the light exposes on us.  He used the onion as a metaphor that as we continue to strip away the layers we expose those underneath. What a liberating and humbling experience and I still strive to continually strip away layers.

I had joined the Orthodox Church, its worship and all, but now I was actually Orthodox. Services have greater meaning, the theology is now mine and things like daily prayers are something that I looked forward to.

It has been 30 years and I still continue to deepen my understanding of the faith; the depth of it still surprises me, no matter what I learn there is always more.

As I look back over my journey I see God was always there in good times and bad and he did have a plan for me and finally guided me to the truth.
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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2012, 01:54:37 PM »

fascinating, thank you for that.

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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2012, 02:15:28 PM »

It was great to finally read your story. Thank you  Smiley
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« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2012, 02:20:01 PM »

Question soder, the issue of Mormonism has come up before 'round these parts. The opinions vary from the extremes of it not being Christian at all (in light of their christology, and the nature of God the Father), and it being treated like just another heterodox group. Since you were Mormon, I'd like your opinion on it.

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« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2012, 03:19:02 PM »

Well seeing the the definition of heterodox is that they have a belief in the trinity but differ from Orthodox beliefs, I would have to say they are not Christian. (I know not pc) From my experience and from their own doctrine they believe;
1. God was once like us a created being.
2.Christ is a created being that became God.

Momons believe there are many gods. (Journal of Discourses, v. 7, p. 333) The Prophet taught that our Father had a Father and so on. (Doctrines of Salvation, 1: 12, 2:47)  He was once a man like us, yea, that God himself the father of us all, dwelt on an earth. (History of the Church 6:305, The King Follett Discourse). I say there are Gods many and Lords many, (History of the Church, Vol. 6, p. 473-479)

Mormons believe that among the spirit children of Elohim the firstborn was and is Jehovah or Jesus Christ to whom all others are juniors. (Joseph Fielding Smith, Man, His Origin and Destiny Page: 127)  Jesus Christ, the Firstborn Son of the Father in the spirit, covenanted to be the Savior (see Moses 4:2; Abraham 3:27)

(from my document comparing Orthodoxy to Mormonism)

Does this sound Christian?
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2012, 03:20:13 PM »

Quote
Does this sound Christian?
Not in the least.

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« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2012, 03:28:10 PM »

And that is just the tip of the iceberg.  Mormon doctrine uses the same terminology but have quite a bit of different meanings than do main line Christians.

Another example.

Mormons do not believe in the Trinity. They teach that Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are three separate Gods and that the Son and Holy Ghost are the literal offspring of Heavenly Father and a celestial wife. That three perfectly united in purpose, form the Godhead. (Joseph Smith-History 1:17, D&C 130:22)
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« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2012, 03:33:08 PM »

And that is just the tip of the iceberg.  Mormon doctrine uses the same terminology but have quite a bit of different meanings than do main line Christians.

Another example.

Mormons do not believe in the Trinity. They teach that Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are three separate Gods and that the Son and Holy Ghost are the literal offspring of Heavenly Father and a celestial wife. That three perfectly united in purpose, form the Godhead. (Joseph Smith-History 1:17, D&C 130:22)
I heard about that once. Something about how it is not stated, but it is inferred that God the Father had hysical relations with Mary, but because God was supernatural, her virginity was intact.

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« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2012, 03:50:04 PM »

And that is just the tip of the iceberg.  Mormon doctrine uses the same terminology but have quite a bit of different meanings than do main line Christians.

Another example.

Mormons do not believe in the Trinity. They teach that Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are three separate Gods and that the Son and Holy Ghost are the literal offspring of Heavenly Father and a celestial wife. That three perfectly united in purpose, form the Godhead. (Joseph Smith-History 1:17, D&C 130:22)

For a period of time, I was convinced that I would one day become a mormon ( I was going around, hoping that one day, a couple of mormon missionaries would knock on our door). Eventually, I couldn't avoid the trinitarian issue, so I decided to find out what exactly the mormons taught about the nature of God. It turned out to be a lot more difficult than I had expected. It didn't matter how many different articles and websites I visited, I never managed to get a direct answer. It was always something like: "We believe in the Trinity and yet, we don't believe in it the same way as other christians". Eventually, my questions were answered but at that time I had already abandoned the idea of inquiering further into mormonism and moved on.

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« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2012, 03:57:12 PM »

True but today they may deny it. This is what their Prophets have said. But lately it depends on the current Appostles if it was doctrine or just their opinion.

Mormons believe that He was not born without the aid of Man, and that Man was God! (Brigham Young-Journal of Discourses, Vol.1, p.50, vol. 8, p. 115) (Orson Pratt, The Seer, Page: 158)
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« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2012, 11:35:48 PM »

I am 48 years old, and grew up LDS (Mormon) in Utah, until 01/21/11 when I officially resigned from that organization. When I moved to Reno in May '11, I intended to check out various churches to see if I could find a fit. The only one I attended (on Christmas eve) was a Methodist church, as my sweetie was raised in that religion. A few months ago, a former co-worker commented on holidays or fasts and such, and I started asking questions when I ended up at a work station next to him. I liked what I heard, and determined that I would attend St. Anthony Greek Orthodox church and check it out.

SO different than Mormon meetings! I always felt that the Mo meetings were boring, and often wished we had candles, or even a little stained glass window or something. Not to mention, more talk of Jesus. I am getting more comfortable each week with the Liturgy, and can now keep my place in the book  laugh I will be taking classes beginning in September to learn more.
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« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2012, 12:39:48 AM »

ShootingStar, and I don't mean to pry in your personal life, but I'd like to hear more on how you left the LDS church, because folks have told me it is very difficult. I'd like to hear your thoughts and why you decided to look for a church after leaving them.
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« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2012, 12:57:32 AM »

I find stories of those BIC leaving the LDS church to be really fascinating.

http://www.exmormon.org/stories.htm < Great way to learn how difficult it is sometimes for cradle Mormons (although sometimes converts too) to leave.

SO different than Mormon meetings! I always felt that the Mo meetings were boring, and often wished we had candles, or even a little stained glass window or something. Not to mention, more talk of Jesus. I am getting more comfortable each week with the Liturgy, and can now keep my place in the book  laugh I will be taking classes beginning in September to learn more.

And no fast & testimony Sundays, thank God! laugh
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« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2012, 09:52:11 PM »

Leaving the Mormon church in Utah can be "hard" in the fact that in Utah, everything revolves around the religion. There's a vernacular that only members understand. If I say "Is the Relief Society meeting being held at the ward house or the stake center"? What would you think? Everyone assumes everyone else is Mormon. I did. When I realized that, it bothered me. When I moved to Reno, it was great not to hear "church speech" or see missionaries riding around or hanging out at the library. From my residence in the Salt Lake Valley, I could see THREE Mormon temples. Here, it was really hard to find the temple, and it is much smaller.

There are families whose ancestors came to the Salt Lake valley 150 years ago, and being a member is just expected, and you are an evil apostate if you leave. Members feel sorry for you, as you won't obtain the highest level in heaven, and surely you must be a sinner, and don't want to repent. As for resigning officially, it's simple one you decide to do it, you just send an email stating that you resign, and it is done. A lot of people get visits from their clergy leaders, and bombarded with little notes, plates of cookies, and looks of pity at the store. As far as I know, nobody knew I resigned except my bishop and the stake president (the guy in charge of a bunch of bishops).

I guess I would say that family guilt is a big reason people find it hard to leave. Personally, I left BECAUSE of a family member. She is very involved in church, but is not nice to her family.

For members outside the "Morridor" (Mormon Corridor: Utah, Idaho, Arizona), I would think it's not as difficult.

I hope that helped, I tend to babble  Grin

P.S. NEPHI!  Roll Eyes Oh, I don't miss the fast and testimony meetings either. Women crying, and old people going on and on (and on...). I never once bore my testimony, since I never had one  Cool

Achronos, I believe that I have always been "spiritual", but I really like the rituals of the Orthodox church, the icons, the prayers, and the people.
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« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2012, 10:11:30 PM »

Thanks for replying. LOL at the "Morridor" comment.

Sounds like you evaded the brainwashing aspect of the religion, which many testimonials on that exmormon site vouch for. And that's how they get alot of these members to stay in something false with threats and fear.
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« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2012, 11:10:48 PM »

P.S. NEPHI!  Roll Eyes Oh, I don't miss the fast and testimony meetings either. Women crying, and old people going on and on (and on...). I never once bore my testimony, since I never had one  Cool

I didn't either in my short-lived membership. I converted because of an LDS girlfriend, so never had one to give. laugh

But how I hated those meetings... It got so tedious hearing the same stories about how the Holy Spirit did something (helped find their keys, find their way through town when lost, etc.) that confirmed their testimony. Oh, and the generic testimony that was always given... "I bear testimony that the LDS church/BoM/Joseph Smith/Monson, etc are true."
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« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2012, 01:58:29 AM »

Thanks for replying. LOL at the "Morridor" comment.

Sounds like you evaded the brainwashing aspect of the religion, which many testimonials on that exmormon site vouch for. And that's how they get alot of these members to stay in something false with threats and fear.
I can't ever say anyone ever threatened me o tried to brainwash me while I was a Mormon, and I live in Utah. I am also skeptical that Orthodox parishes are immune from similar techniques.
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« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2012, 02:51:58 AM »

Quote
I am also skeptical that Orthodox parishes are immune from similar techniques.

I've been Orthodox for some 50 years, across several parishes and jurisdictions, and I've never come across even a shred of such "techniques" among the Orthodox. If anything, the Church is all too often accused of being too laid-back in its evangelism.
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« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2012, 06:43:09 AM »


There are families whose ancestors came to the Salt Lake valley 150 years ago, and being a member is just expected, and you are an evil apostate if you leave. Members feel sorry for you, as you won't obtain the highest level in heaven, and surely you must be a sinner, and don't want to repent.

This describes me to a 'T'.  Pioneer, polygamous ancestors on both sides; raised in the "Morridor"; seminary grad, mission, temple marriage, callings magnified, etc. etc.  Now I'm an Orthodox catechumen (albeit not a good one) struggling with bouts of atheism.  Wife and kids are still Mormons.  Luckily, even though the wife is from a similar background, she's not a true believer in a testimony-bearing, "the Church is true" sense.  She thinks stories about gold plates, polygamy, and becoming a god with your own section of the universe to rule are just plain weird.  She doesn't live with cognitive dissonance as she just doesn't care.  Her god is like your favorite grandpa.  Loving and forgiving.  "As long as you're a decent person, everything will work out in the end and all of us are going to be surprised".  Of course, that view makes Christ's incarnation completely unnecessary, but that hardly matters to her.  She likes the focus on family values, kid programs, and tight-knit, supportive community, but isn't doctrinnaire about anything the church teaches, except that she buys hook, line, and sinker into the self-congratulatory cultural notion that Mormons are the bestest, most loving people on the face of the whole earth, with that special glow that TBM Mormons think only belong to those with "sweet spirits and burning testimonies".  I think she would have left me for some true-believing "Peter Priesthood" if she was a standard-issue Relief Society sister determined to make it to the highest level of the Celestial Kingdom.  As I said, I'm lucky in that regard.  I don't even have to attend sacrament meeting since she never goes herself - just so long as the kids go to their classes for their spiritual formation, and I don't let on to the kids that I have major issues with Mormonism, she's happy as a clam.  The downside is that, since she doesn't care a whit for theology, truth, historical facts, or logical consistency in her spiritual views, she can't grasp why I care so much about those very things - which is what brought me to Orthodoxy in the first place.  This explains her objections to my efforts to attend Orthodox services.  She doesn't see the point at all.  It's all about the kids.

Sorry for making this all about me.  I just realized I probably did that with this post.  In keeping with the OP's intent, I'll just finish by saying the thing that took me out of a lifetime of Mormonism and brought me to Orthodoxy was historical research into Mormon origins, philosophy, eventually reading the New Testament and early church fathers with non-Mormon eyes, the writings of C.S. Lewis, and a strong desire to be a Christian.  That's it in a nutshell.  
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« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2012, 09:43:07 AM »

Thanks for replying. LOL at the "Morridor" comment.

Sounds like you evaded the brainwashing aspect of the religion, which many testimonials on that exmormon site vouch for. And that's how they get alot of these members to stay in something false with threats and fear.
I can't ever say anyone ever threatened me o tried to brainwash me while I was a Mormon, and I live in Utah. I am also skeptical that Orthodox parishes are immune from similar techniques.

The Orthodoc do not tell you to not question or do not look into the truths of the religion. You are told that the prophets have said so so that's it. You will never find that in Orthodoxy.
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« Reply #21 on: August 10, 2012, 10:24:35 AM »

Thanks for replying. LOL at the "Morridor" comment.

Sounds like you evaded the brainwashing aspect of the religion, which many testimonials on that exmormon site vouch for. And that's how they get alot of these members to stay in something false with threats and fear.
I can't ever say anyone ever threatened me o tried to brainwash me while I was a Mormon, and I live in Utah. I am also skeptical that Orthodox parishes are immune from similar techniques.

The Orrhodox do not tell you to not question or do not look into the truths of the religion. You ( in Mormonism) are told that the prophets have said so so that's it. You will never find that in Orthodoxy.

Corrected my earlier post.

It is true both religions teach their youth their dogmas, however I have yet to see an Orthodox teacher tell anyone not to look into the truth of their teachings. We question to determine their truth to what was passed from Christ to the Apostles down to us in the present. Do all do this no but it is not discouraged!
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« Reply #22 on: August 10, 2012, 01:40:31 PM »

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I am also skeptical that Orthodox parishes are immune from similar techniques.

I've been Orthodox for some 50 years, across several parishes and jurisdictions, and I've never come across even a shred of such "techniques" among the Orthodox. If anything, the Church is all too often accused of being too laid-back in its evangelism.
I guess the first thing to do is figure out what we mean by "brainwashing." In my 22 years as a Mormon I rarely encountered anything I would classify as brainwashing.

Thanks for replying. LOL at the "Morridor" comment.

Sounds like you evaded the brainwashing aspect of the religion, which many testimonials on that exmormon site vouch for. And that's how they get alot of these members to stay in something false with threats and fear.
I can't ever say anyone ever threatened me o tried to brainwash me while I was a Mormon, and I live in Utah. I am also skeptical that Orthodox parishes are immune from similar techniques.

The Orthodoc do not tell you to not question or do not look into the truths of the religion. You are told that the prophets have said so so that's it. You will never find that in Orthodoxy.
I guess my case must be an anomalous one. When I was a Mormon there were indeed people who discouraged studying other faiths, but most thought it was fine to study other religions. The official LDS education system where I went to college had a class devoted to learning about other religions.

I have attended a few different Orthodox parishes and met quite a few parishioners both in person and online and my experience with them is similar to my experience with LDS people. I found people who both supported and discouraged learning about different religions. However, one difference I have found is the LDS people I have encountered tend to speak about other faiths in a more gracious manner. Maybe I have just been lucky in my encounter with thousands of Mormons.

I would like to note that I am not arguing in support of LDS doctrine. I decided a long time ago that their claims seem false, but I think it is important to treat even our opponents with fairness and dignity. There are a lot of things that can be criticized in the LDS faith without sacrificing intellectual honesty. We don't need to make hasty generalizations. When I first began to have doubts about the LDS religion it was friends, family, and my bishop who encouraged me to do research and look into other religions. There was no talk of "you better not, or else."
« Last Edit: August 10, 2012, 01:45:31 PM by truthseeker32 » Logged
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« Reply #23 on: August 10, 2012, 02:05:39 PM »

I would like to note that I am not arguing in support of LDS doctrine. I decided a long time ago that their claims seem false, but I think it is important to treat even our opponents with fairness and dignity. There are a lot of things that can be criticized in the LDS faith without sacrificing intellectual honesty. We don't need to make hasty generalizations. When I first began to have doubts about the LDS religion it was friends, family, and my bishop who encouraged me to do research and look into other religions. There was no talk of "you better not, or else."

I agree, we should not make hasty generalizations and treat them with fairness and dignity, and you wre lucky if you did not feel pressured or excluded when leaving the faith, as not faithfully enough, or some other tact, but to most I have talked to after my leaving did not have the experience you did. I wish there were more stories that showed an acceptance to those who leave the Mormon Church.
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« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2012, 04:58:16 PM »

I agree, we should not make hasty generalizations and treat them with fairness and dignity, and you wre lucky if you did not feel pressured or excluded when leaving the faith, as not faithfully enough, or some other tact, but to most I have talked to after my leaving did not have the experience you did. I wish there were more stories that showed an acceptance to those who leave the Mormon Church.
It would be nice if we could be more loving and supportive of friends and family in their struggles, both spiritual and otherwise. I have heard too many stories of families excluding one of their members or even disowning them because they leave a faith, both among the OC and Mormonism.
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« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2012, 08:49:46 PM »

I agree, we should not make hasty generalizations and treat them with fairness and dignity, and you wre lucky if you did not feel pressured or excluded when leaving the faith, as not faithfully enough, or some other tact, but to most I have talked to after my leaving did not have the experience you did. I wish there were more stories that showed an acceptance to those who leave the Mormon Church.
It would be nice if we could be more loving and supportive of friends and family in their struggles, both spiritual and otherwise. I have heard too many stories of families excluding one of their members or even disowning them because they leave a faith, both among the OC and Mormonism.

True I have seen it both ways, an Orthodox to Mormon, the father had a hard time not saying things against the religion, creating a uncomfortable situation.  I understand his frustration, but not the confrontational environment.  Wish it could have been a discussion in love. They loved each other very much but would argue over religion.
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« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2014, 11:24:42 PM »

Is there a website or blog by someone who left Mormonism for Orthodoxy?

I have a friend with a relative who is considering converting to Mormonism, and she is looking for websites to give him.
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« Reply #27 on: March 27, 2014, 05:47:46 AM »

There is this site that goes into some things.
http://saintsandsaints.wordpress.com/

I also have something's that compares Mormonism to Orthodoxy if you are interested PM me.
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« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2014, 10:43:24 PM »

Thanks.  I shared the website with my friend.
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« Reply #29 on: May 24, 2014, 10:23:22 AM »

Mormon communities sound so disconnected from the rest of the country...I'm surprised Utah doesn't want to secede.
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