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Author Topic: Prayers of the Saints in Judaism?  (Read 2229 times) Average Rating: 0
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Augustine
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« on: November 05, 2004, 03:39:39 PM »

Though we should not have to look to Judaists for evidences for our faith (since in truth the Orthodox Church is Israel, her root being the remnant thereof), it would seem that for many Protestants (particularly the fundamental, evangelical variety who are most vocal and conspicuous in North America) the views and beliefs of Jews is of some special importance.

Very often these same Protestants will hold certain Orthodox practices (typically they come to know them via Roman Catholicism) as being "idolatrous" or "inventions of men".  What is interesting however, is that there are certain Orthodox practices which are actually continuations of pre-New-Testament, Israelitic piety.  For example, the kissing of sacred objects is right from Judaism (one need only watch the procession of the Torah through a Synagogue of men to see this).  So is prayer on behalf of the dead (which is still practiced by Jews, and is evidenced in the deuterocanonical books of the Bible, which the Jews pay more regard to than their Protestant-Evangelical friends typically do.)

One thing which most are unaware of however, is the Jewish practice of seeking the intercession of their saints.  The intercession of the reposed TZADDIKIM (saints, righteous ones) is very much valued by "ultra-orthodox" Jews like the Hasids, largely on the basis of Biblical examples like Moses interceeding on behalf of Israel (which we are told is what saved Israel from utter destruction.)  The most typical way of seeking this intercession, is for Jews to visit the graves of these "righteous ones" and offering prayers and alms.  Indeed, in the opinion of some Jewish religious authorities, even directly asking the dead for their intercession is permitted, though understandably given Judaism's solidified "reactionary" position as of the advent of Christianity, there are Jewish authorities who do not believe this is allowed (though they do believe visiting graves and praying there with the hope of obtaining the prayers of the departed tzaddikim is permitted.)

Quote
The ancient minhag yisrael of visiting and davening at graves of tzaddikim during times of tribulation has many sources in Talmudic literature ... But what is the reason for this? How does it help us? ...

The Talmud cites two explanations: 1) To serve as a reminder of man's immortality so that one repent while he still can; 2) To ask the dead to pray for mercy on our behalf ... The second reason quoted in the Talmud - to ask the dead to pray for mercy on our behalf - demands clarification.

Many people assume that this means that we are allowed to pray to the dead to ask them to help us. This is a serious mistake and strictly forbidden. One who prays with this intent transgresses the Biblical command of "You shall not recognize the gods of others in my presence". It may also be a violation of the Biblical command against "one who consults the dead".

If so, what does the Talmud mean when it says that we "ask the dead to beg for mercy on our behalf"? We find two schools of thought concerning this matter:

Some hold that it means that it is permitted to speak directly to the dead to ask them to daven to Hashem on our behalf. This is similar to the prayers that we find throughout Selichos which are addressed to the malachim. Although the malachim - who are merely G-d's messengers - do not posses the ability to do anything of their own accord, still we may ask them to "deliver" our prayers to Hashem. So, too, it is permitted to address the dead directly and ask them to intercede on our behalf at the heavenly throne. (taken from here)

Reading the above excerpt or reading the entire article it was taken from, it's obvious that there is some duplicity involved in the Jewish explanation (a waffling and inconsistancy, which as I mentioned before, is a continuation of Judaism's attempt to define itself in distinction from Christ and His Church), but what is quite clear is that pious Jews do customarily seek the intercession of the righteous dead who they believe are closer to God than they, or at the very least seek to be covered in the merits of their "righteous ones" and obtain them as advocates on their behalf.  The full article the above was excerted from also makes passing mention of the fact that there are Jewish prayers in which the angels (malachim) are directly addressed, with the understanding that they carry prayers to God.

Given that participants in the New Testament are supposed to have better access to the Heavenly City, and the fact that those who "sleep in Christ" are believed to be with Him in this Holy City, if anything a more glowing, unobscured and unambiguous approach to the Saints would seem merited.

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« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2004, 05:09:34 PM »

Here's an article I like to post that shows the presence of some of the things you mentioned w/in Judaism.

Good topic, Augustine.
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« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2004, 02:48:10 PM »

One question, from a Christian point of view, wouldn't we have to say that Jewish prayers to the saints would have been useless before the Resurrection?  Because all the souls of the saints would still be in Sheol, would they not?
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« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2004, 03:43:47 PM »

But the angels were still around the Throne!  St. Michael pray for us!
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« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2004, 12:58:15 PM »

Thank you for this topic and pointing it out to us, Augustine. Jesus was a Jew. He was the fulfillment of all the heavenly things after which Moses had to fashion the things of the Tabernacle etc. God gave Moses  the patterns of the heavenly things and Jesus explained a lot to the Jews in making reference to those Mosaic laws. I have come to find out that an understanding of those patterns helps a lot with understanding what Jesus spoke about  and why He did what He did.

The Old Testament is a prefiguration of the New.

As for what Penelope says:
Quote
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
One question, from a Christian point of view, wouldn't we have to say that Jewish prayers to the saints would have been useless before the Resurrection?  Because all the souls of the saints would still be in Sheol, would they not?


Sheol was a place where its inhabitants still could pray, as we can see in Luke 16 where the rich man is conversing and reasoning with Father Abraham. And why would we want to judge the value of the prayers of any soul ?
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2014, 11:33:36 AM »

Fr. David--I'd like to ask if you could post the URL for that article. A link does not appear in your post.
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« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2014, 12:06:25 AM »

Fr. David--I'd like to ask if you could post the URL for that article. A link does not appear in your post.

It's working for me. This post is from 2004? He may not see it?

Here's the URL : http://www.orthodoxconvert.info/Q-A.php?c=Intercession-Intercession%20In%20Heaven

And a link for that one: http://www.orthodoxconvert.info/Q-A.php?c=Intercession-Intercession%20In%20Heaven (if it works - sorry for doing both twice but it looked like it wasn't working, I'll leave them both in case you have trouble following link for some reason)

While we're on it, I have another link passed to me by a hierodeacon friend of mine. It's called Prayer and the Departed Saints and has been very helpful to me: http://www.protomartyr.org/prayer.html

link: http://www.protomartyr.org/prayer.html


Hope that helps. Smiley
« Last Edit: June 09, 2014, 12:07:29 AM by Anna.T » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2014, 01:12:46 AM »

This is an article on a closely related topic (the invocation of angels) in Judaism, that you may find interesting: https://faculty.biu.ac.il/~testsm/Angels_Intermed.html

I have a few issues with the article, but overall it's fairly good.

While prayer to angels has been well documented in Jewish history, including at the time of - and before - Christ, the notion of prayer to the righteous ones is (as far as I am aware) a much more recent innovation, that is primarily practiced by the Hasidim.  It is definitely far from free of controversy in the Orthodox Jewish community, and outside of it (and even in the Modern Orthodox community) is pretty much non-existent and often condemned.  The Hasidim have a lot of thoughts and practices that are rather similar to Christian concepts and practices, and while some of it is certainly based on Kabbalah and other more mystical Jewish writings, I've read a fair amount of scholarship suggesting that some of it (including prayer to the righteous ones) may have been strongly influenced by Christianity.

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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2014, 01:33:49 AM »

Though we should not have to look to Judaists for evidences for our faith (since in truth the Orthodox Church is Israel, her root being the remnant thereof), it would seem that for many Protestants (particularly the fundamental, evangelical variety who are most vocal and conspicuous in North America) the views and beliefs of Jews is of some special importance.

Very often these same Protestants will hold certain Orthodox practices (typically they come to know them via Roman Catholicism) as being "idolatrous" or "inventions of men".  What is interesting however, is that there are certain Orthodox practices which are actually continuations of pre-New-Testament, Israelitic piety.  For example, the kissing of sacred objects is right from Judaism (one need only watch the procession of the Torah through a Synagogue of men to see this).  So is prayer on behalf of the dead (which is still practiced by Jews, and is evidenced in the deuterocanonical books of the Bible, which the Jews pay more regard to than their Protestant-Evangelical friends typically do.)

One thing which most are unaware of however, is the Jewish practice of seeking the intercession of their saints.  The intercession of the reposed TZADDIKIM (saints, righteous ones) is very much valued by "ultra-orthodox" Jews like the Hasids, largely on the basis of Biblical examples like Moses interceeding on behalf of Israel (which we are told is what saved Israel from utter destruction.)  The most typical way of seeking this intercession, is for Jews to visit the graves of these "righteous ones" and offering prayers and alms.  Indeed, in the opinion of some Jewish religious authorities, even directly asking the dead for their intercession is permitted, though understandably given Judaism's solidified "reactionary" position as of the advent of Christianity, there are Jewish authorities who do not believe this is allowed (though they do believe visiting graves and praying there with the hope of obtaining the prayers of the departed tzaddikim is permitted.)

Quote
The ancient minhag yisrael of visiting and davening at graves of tzaddikim during times of tribulation has many sources in Talmudic literature ... But what is the reason for this? How does it help us? ...

The Talmud cites two explanations: 1) To serve as a reminder of man's immortality so that one repent while he still can; 2) To ask the dead to pray for mercy on our behalf ... The second reason quoted in the Talmud - to ask the dead to pray for mercy on our behalf - demands clarification.

Many people assume that this means that we are allowed to pray to the dead to ask them to help us. This is a serious mistake and strictly forbidden. One who prays with this intent transgresses the Biblical command of "You shall not recognize the gods of others in my presence". It may also be a violation of the Biblical command against "one who consults the dead".

If so, what does the Talmud mean when it says that we "ask the dead to beg for mercy on our behalf"? We find two schools of thought concerning this matter:

Some hold that it means that it is permitted to speak directly to the dead to ask them to daven to Hashem on our behalf. This is similar to the prayers that we find throughout Selichos which are addressed to the malachim. Although the malachim - who are merely G-d's messengers - do not posses the ability to do anything of their own accord, still we may ask them to "deliver" our prayers to Hashem. So, too, it is permitted to address the dead directly and ask them to intercede on our behalf at the heavenly throne. (taken from here)

Reading the above excerpt or reading the entire article it was taken from, it's obvious that there is some duplicity involved in the Jewish explanation (a waffling and inconsistancy, which as I mentioned before, is a continuation of Judaism's attempt to define itself in distinction from Christ and His Church), but what is quite clear is that pious Jews do customarily seek the intercession of the righteous dead who they believe are closer to God than they, or at the very least seek to be covered in the merits of their "righteous ones" and obtain them as advocates on their behalf.  The full article the above was excerted from also makes passing mention of the fact that there are Jewish prayers in which the angels (malachim) are directly addressed, with the understanding that they carry prayers to God.

Given that participants in the New Testament are supposed to have better access to the Heavenly City, and the fact that those who "sleep in Christ" are believed to be with Him in this Holy City, if anything a more glowing, unobscured and unambiguous approach to the Saints would seem merited.



Informative and educative .. Thank you
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« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2014, 01:53:03 AM »

The Hasidim have a lot of thoughts and practices that are rather similar to Christian concepts and practices

I noticed this quite a bit when I went on an undergrad class trip to a Chabad center/synagogue and had a short lecture and Q&A with the rabbi. Definitely some interesting overlap there, although my then-professor's Reformed background probably had a lot less in common with it. I imagine the overlap is more with traditional Christian groups that (still) have a heavy presence of mysticism and what-not.
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« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2014, 03:48:57 AM »

The Hasidim have a lot of thoughts and practices that are rather similar to Christian concepts and practices

I noticed this quite a bit when I went on an undergrad class trip to a Chabad center/synagogue and had a short lecture and Q&A with the rabbi. Definitely some interesting overlap there, although my then-professor's Reformed background probably had a lot less in common with it. I imagine the overlap is more with traditional Christian groups that (still) have a heavy presence of mysticism and what-not.

There are certain streams of Reformed thought (and it's even more common in the Conservative movement, from what I understand) that still certainly have a great deal of mysticism.  You should check out neo-hasidism, which is a movement to introduce Hasidisic thought and practice into non-Orthodox Jewish movements and groups.  There's also the Jewish Renewal movement, which seeks to bring back Jewish mysticism into non-Orthodox movements.  Interestingly enough, there are actually some in the Reconstructionist movement who have also been heavily influenced by Jewish mysticism.  You may also be interested in checking out the Musar movement, which arose in the non-Hasidic Orthodox community - in part as a response to it, and also has a great emphasis on meditative and pietistic practices.

Anyways, back to your main point.  It's quite likely that Jewish and Christian religious movements (especially mystic movements) have influenced each other from the time of Christ to the present day.  People often have a totally a-historical notion that Jews and Christians never had anything to do with each other since the Romans stormed Jerusalem and destroyed everything.  But the truth is, there was a lot of communication between the two, save for particular times and places when persecution of the Jewish community was at its height.  An example of this is that St. John Chrysostomos, when he was in Antioch, preached against the Christians going to the synagogues - which would suggest that this was a wide-spread "issue" in the Church of Antioch.  There's also been a good deal of scholarship strongly suggesting that Jewish and Christian mystics in Spain were reading each other's works for a least a century before the Jews were expelled.
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« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2014, 12:51:00 PM »

There are certain streams of Reformed thought (and it's even more common in the Conservative movement, from what I understand) that still certainly have a great deal of mysticism.  You should check out neo-hasidism, which is a movement to introduce Hasidisic thought and practice into non-Orthodox Jewish movements and groups.  There's also the Jewish Renewal movement, which seeks to bring back Jewish mysticism into non-Orthodox movements.  Interestingly enough, there are actually some in the Reconstructionist movement who have also been heavily influenced by Jewish mysticism.  You may also be interested in checking out the Musar movement, which arose in the non-Hasidic Orthodox community - in part as a response to it, and also has a great emphasis on meditative and pietistic practices.

Oh, sorry, I was meaning Reformed as in Calvinism etc. I should've been a little more clear, but that's interesting nonetheless.

Quote
Anyways, back to your main point.  It's quite likely that Jewish and Christian religious movements (especially mystic movements) have influenced each other from the time of Christ to the present day.  People often have a totally a-historical notion that Jews and Christians never had anything to do with each other since the Romans stormed Jerusalem and destroyed everything.  But the truth is, there was a lot of communication between the two, save for particular times and places when persecution of the Jewish community was at its height.  An example of this is that St. John Chrysostomos, when he was in Antioch, preached against the Christians going to the synagogues - which would suggest that this was a wide-spread "issue" in the Church of Antioch.  There's also been a good deal of scholarship strongly suggesting that Jewish and Christian mystics in Spain were reading each other's works for a least a century before the Jews were expelled.

I definitely agree with that. One of my professors (an Orthodox priest and expert in Second Temple Judaism) emphasizes the Second Temple context of Christianity. Many early Christian assumptions, processes, or applications (e.g. Scriptural exegesis/interpretative techniques/notions about the world/etc.) are either straight out of the very-diverse period of Judaism or have clear roots therein, and such continued, as you said, for centuries. My awareness of it is more limited to the Church Fathers' similarities with the Rabbis, though, and I haven't heard much about laity overlapping.
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« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2014, 02:07:33 PM »

Fr. David--I'd like to ask if you could post the URL for that article. A link does not appear in your post.

It's working for me. This post is from 2004? He may not see it?

Here's the URL : http://www.orthodoxconvert.info/Q-A.php?c=Intercession-Intercession%20In%20Heaven

And a link for that one: http://www.orthodoxconvert.info/Q-A.php?c=Intercession-Intercession%20In%20Heaven (if it works - sorry for doing both twice but it looked like it wasn't working, I'll leave them both in case you have trouble following link for some reason)

While we're on it, I have another link passed to me by a hierodeacon friend of mine. It's called Prayer and the Departed Saints and has been very helpful to me: http://www.protomartyr.org/prayer.html

link: http://www.protomartyr.org/prayer.html


Hope that helps. Smiley

Before I posted, I was reading this thread here:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php?topic=4500.0;imode

And I hadn't been able to find the version of the thread we're seeing now, where the date of a post and links embedded in text appear. (I had no idea this discussion was ten years old.)

Thanks to you for your help and to others for their comments since. Smiley
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« Reply #13 on: June 09, 2014, 05:55:22 PM »

Fr. David--I'd like to ask if you could post the URL for that article. A link does not appear in your post.

It's working for me. This post is from 2004? He may not see it?

Here's the URL : http://www.orthodoxconvert.info/Q-A.php?c=Intercession-Intercession%20In%20Heaven

And a link for that one: http://www.orthodoxconvert.info/Q-A.php?c=Intercession-Intercession%20In%20Heaven (if it works - sorry for doing both twice but it looked like it wasn't working, I'll leave them both in case you have trouble following link for some reason)

While we're on it, I have another link passed to me by a hierodeacon friend of mine. It's called Prayer and the Departed Saints and has been very helpful to me: http://www.protomartyr.org/prayer.html

link: http://www.protomartyr.org/prayer.html


Hope that helps. Smiley

Before I posted, I was reading this thread here:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php?topic=4500.0;imode

And I hadn't been able to find the version of the thread we're seeing now, where the date of a post and links embedded in text appear. (I had no idea this discussion was ten years old.)

Thanks to you for your help and to others for their comments since. Smiley


No problem.  Smiley

I'm glad you brought it back. I was happy to see the posted article myself. 

Glad I could help. Smiley
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« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2014, 06:02:01 PM »

There are certain streams of Reformed thought (and it's even more common in the Conservative movement, from what I understand) that still certainly have a great deal of mysticism.  You should check out neo-hasidism, which is a movement to introduce Hasidisic thought and practice into non-Orthodox Jewish movements and groups.  There's also the Jewish Renewal movement, which seeks to bring back Jewish mysticism into non-Orthodox movements.  Interestingly enough, there are actually some in the Reconstructionist movement who have also been heavily influenced by Jewish mysticism.  You may also be interested in checking out the Musar movement, which arose in the non-Hasidic Orthodox community - in part as a response to it, and also has a great emphasis on meditative and pietistic practices.

Oh, sorry, I was meaning Reformed as in Calvinism etc. I should've been a little more clear, but that's interesting nonetheless.

Quote
Anyways, back to your main point.  It's quite likely that Jewish and Christian religious movements (especially mystic movements) have influenced each other from the time of Christ to the present day.  People often have a totally a-historical notion that Jews and Christians never had anything to do with each other since the Romans stormed Jerusalem and destroyed everything.  But the truth is, there was a lot of communication between the two, save for particular times and places when persecution of the Jewish community was at its height.  An example of this is that St. John Chrysostomos, when he was in Antioch, preached against the Christians going to the synagogues - which would suggest that this was a wide-spread "issue" in the Church of Antioch.  There's also been a good deal of scholarship strongly suggesting that Jewish and Christian mystics in Spain were reading each other's works for a least a century before the Jews were expelled.

I definitely agree with that. One of my professors (an Orthodox priest and expert in Second Temple Judaism) emphasizes the Second Temple context of Christianity. Many early Christian assumptions, processes, or applications (e.g. Scriptural exegesis/interpretative techniques/notions about the world/etc.) are either straight out of the very-diverse period of Judaism or have clear roots therein, and such continued, as you said, for centuries. My awareness of it is more limited to the Church Fathers' similarities with the Rabbis, though, and I haven't heard much about laity overlapping.

Indeed, the New Testament writers and the Church Fathers interpretive techniques were the same techniques (i.e., the technique of remez) that the early Rabbinical tradition of the first century used. (say, Philo of Alexandria). I actually read a book about this a while back, but I cannot remember the name of it. Anyway, what your prof. said seems to corroborate with what I have read.
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« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2014, 12:08:05 AM »

There are certain streams of Reformed thought (and it's even more common in the Conservative movement, from what I understand) that still certainly have a great deal of mysticism.  You should check out neo-hasidism, which is a movement to introduce Hasidisic thought and practice into non-Orthodox Jewish movements and groups.  There's also the Jewish Renewal movement, which seeks to bring back Jewish mysticism into non-Orthodox movements.  Interestingly enough, there are actually some in the Reconstructionist movement who have also been heavily influenced by Jewish mysticism.  You may also be interested in checking out the Musar movement, which arose in the non-Hasidic Orthodox community - in part as a response to it, and also has a great emphasis on meditative and pietistic practices.

Oh, sorry, I was meaning Reformed as in Calvinism etc. I should've been a little more clear, but that's interesting nonetheless.

Quote
Anyways, back to your main point.  It's quite likely that Jewish and Christian religious movements (especially mystic movements) have influenced each other from the time of Christ to the present day.  People often have a totally a-historical notion that Jews and Christians never had anything to do with each other since the Romans stormed Jerusalem and destroyed everything.  But the truth is, there was a lot of communication between the two, save for particular times and places when persecution of the Jewish community was at its height.  An example of this is that St. John Chrysostomos, when he was in Antioch, preached against the Christians going to the synagogues - which would suggest that this was a wide-spread "issue" in the Church of Antioch.  There's also been a good deal of scholarship strongly suggesting that Jewish and Christian mystics in Spain were reading each other's works for a least a century before the Jews were expelled.

I definitely agree with that. One of my professors (an Orthodox priest and expert in Second Temple Judaism) emphasizes the Second Temple context of Christianity. Many early Christian assumptions, processes, or applications (e.g. Scriptural exegesis/interpretative techniques/notions about the world/etc.) are either straight out of the very-diverse period of Judaism or have clear roots therein, and such continued, as you said, for centuries. My awareness of it is more limited to the Church Fathers' similarities with the Rabbis, though, and I haven't heard much about laity overlapping.

There's also a good deal of Christian theology that pre-dated Christ; for instance, there's some evidence that at least a portion of Second Temple-era Jews believed in a sort of Trinity.

It's all very interesting to me, the connections between Jewish and Christian thought and practice - and even more-so, how so many Christians and Jews are totally unaware of it.

EDIT: And yes, Calvinism definitely seems to be totally devoid of any conception of mysticism.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2014, 12:08:36 AM by JamesRottnek » Logged

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« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2014, 12:04:33 PM »

There's also a good deal of Christian theology that pre-dated Christ; for instance, there's some evidence that at least a portion of Second Temple-era Jews believed in a sort of Trinity.

I'm interested to know more about this issue. If you're able to, please start a new thread about it (so the present one doesn't go off-topic). Smiley
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« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2014, 02:16:36 PM »

From the website of Kever Rachel [Rachel's tomb]:

Rachel Imeinu [Our Mother]

For thousands of years, Jews have unburdened their hearts to Rachel Imeinu - and had their prayers answerd. The Barren were blessed with children, The sick were cured, The single found shiduchim And the broken-hearted found solace and peace.

רחל מבכה על בניה, מאנה להינחם

WHAT IS HER SECRET?

When the Bais Hamikdosh [Temple] was destroyed, Moshe Rabbeinu, the Avos [Patriarchs], along with the Imahos [Mothers] stormed the heavens, and pleaded with Hashem to bring the Jews back to Eretz Yisroel. But, the Jews had sinned - and the almighty sealed the judgment against them. And though Avraham, Yitzchok, Yaakov and Moshe tried, though they spoke of the great things they had done in their lives, the gates of mercy were sealed tight.

UNTIL RACHEL AROSE. In her merit - in the merit of her love to her sister Leah, and in the merit of her refusal to shame her at great personal sacrifice - The Almighty annulled His decree. To her Hashem said - מנעי קולך מבכי - stop crying, because your prayers have been heard. And they continue to be heard, to this day.
יש שכר לפעולתך, ושבו בנים לגבולם

Armored Buses:

Since violence has erupted in the Bethlehem area near the kever, the activities of Mosdos Kever Rachel have become increasingly difficult to maintain. To ensure our visitors' complete safety, the army allows only bullet-proof vehicles under military escort to visit the site. We organize armored buses, operating several times daily at a subsidized price, to serve Jews who come to visit the kever.

For Info. About The Bus Schedule: "Click Here"

Mikvah:

After overcoming great obstacles, we have built, for the first time in history, a Mikvah for daily use of the visitors. Kabbalah offers a precedent for building a mikvah here, proving that for hundreds of years, Jews have aspired to purify themselves at this place.

Midnight Kollel:

Kabbalah says that the middle of the night, when silence reigns and the world sleeps, is an hour of Divine favor and mercy. Mosdos Kever Rachel sponsors a Midnight Kollel (Chatzot) for Torah scholars and the pious to come to Rachel's Kever, where they learn and pray until dawn. Kollel "Kol Berama" The tomb of Rachel has become a home for a group of young Talmidei Chachomim [disciples of the sages/scholars], who come daily and learn Gemara and Halacha, and fill the tomb with their sweet sounds of Torah.

Daily Minyan Tehillim:

Every day, a Minyan [10 people] recites the entire Sefer Tehillim [Psalter] on behalf of our sponsors and all of Rachel's children. When their prayer unites with the holiness of the site, its power is intensified. For The Schedule of the Minyan, And for all Minyanim "Click Here"

Kever Rachel Hotline:

1888-2-ROCHEL (276-2435)

Mosdos Kever Rachel's phone lines bring the merit of Rachel Imeinu to Jews around the world. Mosdos Kever Rachel maintains a 24-hour phone line, enabling Jews everywhere to have Tehilim recited on their behalf, free of charge, by Torah scholars of Kollel Kever Rachel.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2014, 02:42:47 PM by Romaios » Logged
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« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2014, 02:27:16 PM »

On Rabbi Nachman of Breslov:

During the Rebbe's lifetime, thousands of Hasidim traveled to be with him for the Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashana, Chanuka, and Shavuot, when he delivered his formal lessons. On the last Rosh Hashana of his life, Rebbe Nachman stressed to his followers the importance of being with him for that holiday in particular. Therefore, after the Rebbe's death, Reb Noson instituted an annual pilgrimage to the Rebbe's gravesite on Rosh Hashana.

This annual pilgrimage, called the Rosh Hashana kibbutz, drew thousands of Hasidim from all over Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania and even Poland until 1917, when the Bolshevik Revolution forced it to continue clandestinely. Only a dozen or so Hasidim risked making the annual pilgrimage during the Communist era, as the authorities regularly raided the gathering and often arrested and imprisoned worshippers. Beginning in the mid-1960s, Hasidim who lived outside Russia began to sneak into Uman to pray at Rebbe Nachman's grave during the year. After the fall of Communism in 1989, the gates were reopened entirely. In 2008, approximately 25,000 people from all over the world participated in this annual pilgrimage.[15]

In April 1810, Rebbe Nachman called two of his closest disciples, Rabbi Aharon of Breslov and Rabbi Naftali of Nemirov, to act as witnesses for an unprecedented vow:

    "If someone comes to my grave, gives a coin to charity, and says these ten Psalms [the Tikkun HaKlali], I will pull him out from the depths of Gehinnom!" [Hell] "It makes no difference what he did until that day, but from that day on, he must take upon himself not to return to his foolish ways".

This vow spurred many followers to undertake the trip to Rebbe Nachman's grave, even during the Communist crackdown.



Other tombs/tents [ohalim] of Jewish tzaddikim: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohel_%28grave%29
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