OrthodoxChristianity.net
October 25, 2014, 09:57:30 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Orthodox Churches as Percent of Population  (Read 1013 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Jetavan
Argumentum ad australopithecum
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Science to the Fourth Power
Jurisdiction: Ohayo Gozaimasu
Posts: 6,580


Barlaam and Josaphat


WWW
« on: May 20, 2012, 10:03:36 PM »

EO Churches, as percent of population.
Logged

If you will, you can become all flame.
Extra caritatem nulla salus.
In order to become whole, take the "I" out of "holiness".
सर्वभूतहित
Ἄνω σχῶμεν τὰς καρδίας
"Those who say religion has nothing to do with politics do not know what religion is." -- Mohandas Gandhi
Y dduw bo'r diolch.
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Offline Offline

Posts: 30,096


Goodbye for now, my friend


« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2012, 10:07:09 PM »

The county I'm currently residing in is 1.0-4.99%  ... yay!  Smiley
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,963



« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2012, 10:33:13 PM »


« Last Edit: May 20, 2012, 10:36:40 PM by ialmisry » Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
Opus118
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1,613



« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2012, 10:48:10 PM »

The county I'm currently residing in is 1.0-4.99%  ... yay!  Smiley

Mine is 10-fold less than yours. I am curious about the upper tip of Idaho. Perhaps all it takes is one family.
Logged
Shiny
Site Supporter
Moderated
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Groucho Marxist
Jurisdiction: Dahntahn Stoop Haus
Posts: 13,267


Paint It Red


« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2012, 10:54:25 PM »

Some interesting population density stats there.
Logged

“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
Father H
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian--God's One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: UOCofUSA-Ecumenical Patriarchate
Posts: 2,611



« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2012, 11:19:01 AM »

Does anyone have any recent country by country Orthodox population stats?   I remember that there were several websites with stats from 12 years ago, but if anyone knows of any more recent, please share. 
Logged
off2
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2012, 10:33:06 PM »

FatherHill, A website and organizational name are legible on the map referenced in the first post. Perhaps that would point you in the right direction.
Logged
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2012, 05:04:37 AM »

I'd highly appreciate if someone explained me in a few words why areas like California, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, New England and the Mid-Atlantic have relatively high EO populations and other don't.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2012, 05:11:04 AM by Michał Kalina » Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
elephant
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOAA
Posts: 610



« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2012, 07:50:32 AM »

Dear Michal,

You might be interested in reading the recent study published by Alexei Krindatch (akrindatch@aol.com).

You can find it here: http://oca.org/news/headline-news/new-study-reveals-five-facts-about-the-orthodox-church-in-the-us

Keep in mind that roughly half of the Orthodox in America are members of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America.  I would expect that a population map showing people of Greek heritage would look similar, with the exception of Alaska.  For instance, Florida is a very popular retirement destination for Greeks.  The Northeast is home to many people of Greek heritage.

Love, elephant
Logged
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2012, 07:58:30 AM »

Thank you but I'm less interested in demographics than in the historic and social factors that resulted in demographics. For example: why Florida is so popular among the Greeks and Alaska is not? Are there any favourite places for the Ethnic Orthodox? ...
« Last Edit: May 23, 2012, 08:00:23 AM by Michał Kalina » Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
elephant
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOAA
Posts: 610



« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2012, 08:04:01 AM »

Dear Michal,

Mr. Kindratch may have the best idea, since he did so much research.  You could write and ask him.

Personally I think the attraction of Florida is the weather.  It's more like Greece than Alaska! 

love, elephant
Logged
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2012, 08:12:01 AM »

Next question: Why are there relatively many Orthodox people on the coasts (with an exception of the Mideastern coast) and almost none in the middle of the country (with an exception of Arizona)? Why is Arizona so special? Why do the Orthodox don't like the Mideastern coast?
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
Big Chris
Formerly "mint"
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Inquirer
Jurisdiction: Roman Catholic Diocese of Charlotte, NC
Posts: 277

I live by the river where the old gods still dream


« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2012, 08:29:30 AM »

For one thing, Orthodox seem to prefer subtropical climate zones.  The higher population density areas do happen to be in locales with such a variation on this climatic zone.  The West coast, in particular, has a Mediterranean climate, which is a type of subtropical climate.  Orthodox do not seem to prefer continental climate zones.
Logged

Tasting is Believing
witega
Is it enough now, to tell you you matter?
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Diocese of the South
Posts: 1,614


« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2012, 09:23:49 AM »

I'd highly appreciate if someone explained me in a few words why areas like California, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, New England and the Mid-Atlantic have relatively high EO populations and other don't.

I suspect it's not an EO-specific answer. I expect if you find a map for immigrant settlement patterns in the 20th century--whether Orthodox, Asian, East Indian, African, etc it would look rather similar.
Logged

Ariel Starling - New album

For it were better to suffer everything, rather than divide the Church of God. Even martyrdom for the sake of preventing division would not be less glorious than for refusing to worship idols. - St. Dionysius the Great
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,963



« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2012, 09:28:26 AM »

Thank you but I'm less interested in demographics than in the historic and social factors that resulted in demographics. For example: why Florida is so popular among the Greeks and Alaska is not? Are there any favourite places for the Ethnic Orthodox? ...
Florida is popular among everyone and Alaska is not.

Most Orthodox immigrants did not come here to farm, and the places they could make it (cities, mining areas, trading areas, etc.) dictated settlement patterns.  If you see the settlement patterns above (density per county), the less Orthodox areas are also more sparsely populated.
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,963



« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2012, 09:29:35 AM »

For one thing, Orthodox seem to prefer subtropical climate zones.  The higher population density areas do happen to be in locales with such a variation on this climatic zone.  The West coast, in particular, has a Mediterranean climate, which is a type of subtropical climate.  Orthodox do not seem to prefer continental climate zones.
You mean like in the heartland of American Orthodoxy, Pennsylvania and the Ohio Valley?
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,963



« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2012, 09:31:46 AM »

Next question: Why are there relatively many Orthodox people on the coasts (with an exception of the Mideastern coast) and almost none in the middle of the country (with an exception of Arizona)? Why is Arizona so special? Why do the Orthodox don't like the Mideastern coast?
The Mideastern coast is more densely populated by the WASPs, who had a couple centuries head start.  There are plenty of Orthodox, their numbers are just diluted.

Or are you talking about the Carolinas?  (VA, MD, and DE are usually considered the Mid-Atlantic coast).  There the WASPS and the blacks have populated it as much as it is populated.  There is not much to attract you there unless you were a farmer who wanted to squeeze in between the locals.

Arizona gets a lot of people bouncing back from California.

Interesting.  I just noticed that DE is the only state that has an Orthodox presence throughout.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2012, 09:38:13 AM by ialmisry » Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
Big Chris
Formerly "mint"
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Inquirer
Jurisdiction: Roman Catholic Diocese of Charlotte, NC
Posts: 277

I live by the river where the old gods still dream


« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2012, 09:37:20 AM »

For one thing, Orthodox seem to prefer subtropical climate zones.  The higher population density areas do happen to be in locales with such a variation on this climatic zone.  The West coast, in particular, has a Mediterranean climate, which is a type of subtropical climate.  Orthodox do not seem to prefer continental climate zones.
You mean like in the heartland of American Orthodoxy, Pennsylvania and the Ohio Valley?

Yes, the heartland is located right on the dividing line between subtropical/continental climate zones.
Logged

Tasting is Believing
Father H
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian--God's One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: UOCofUSA-Ecumenical Patriarchate
Posts: 2,611



« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2012, 09:41:17 AM »

A website and organizational name are legible on the map referenced in the first post. Perhaps that would point you in the right direction.

Thanks, but this only has stats for the US.  I am looking for for world country by country stats. 
Logged
elephant
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOAA
Posts: 610



« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2012, 09:42:24 AM »

Plus Arizona has a higher than average population of Orthodox monastics.

St. Anthony's & St. Paisius's must account for at least 75 out of 6.5MM?

love, elephant
Logged
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,963



« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2012, 09:45:12 AM »

Next question: Why are there relatively many Orthodox people on the coasts (with an exception of the Mideastern coast) and almost none in the middle of the country (with an exception of Arizona)? Why is Arizona so special? Why do the Orthodox don't like the Mideastern coast?
the dates of statehood also might be interesting (population is a major factor for statehood).
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #21 on: May 23, 2012, 10:32:06 AM »

Next question: Why are there relatively many Orthodox people on the coasts (with an exception of the Mideastern coast) and almost none in the middle of the country (with an exception of Arizona)? Why is Arizona so special? Why do the Orthodox don't like the Mideastern coast?
The Mideastern coast is more densely populated by the WASPs, who had a couple centuries head start.  There are plenty of Orthodox, their numbers are just diluted.

Or are you talking about the Carolinas?  (VA, MD, and DE are usually considered the Mid-Atlantic coast).  There the WASPS and the blacks have populated it as much as it is populated.  There is not much to attract you there unless you were a farmer who wanted to squeeze in between the locals.

With "the Mideastern coast" I meant Carolinas and Georgia.

edit: And what about Colorado?
« Last Edit: May 23, 2012, 10:44:55 AM by Michał Kalina » Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
Big Chris
Formerly "mint"
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Inquirer
Jurisdiction: Roman Catholic Diocese of Charlotte, NC
Posts: 277

I live by the river where the old gods still dream


« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2012, 10:45:27 AM »


With "the Mideastern coast" I meant Carolinas and Georgia.

It's the traditional fundamentalist Evangelical Christian "Bible Belt," for one.  Even Catholics are in a minority there.
Logged

Tasting is Believing
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,963



« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2012, 11:06:06 AM »

Next question: Why are there relatively many Orthodox people on the coasts (with an exception of the Mideastern coast) and almost none in the middle of the country (with an exception of Arizona)? Why is Arizona so special? Why do the Orthodox don't like the Mideastern coast?
The Mideastern coast is more densely populated by the WASPs, who had a couple centuries head start.  There are plenty of Orthodox, their numbers are just diluted.

Or are you talking about the Carolinas?  (VA, MD, and DE are usually considered the Mid-Atlantic coast).  There the WASPS and the blacks have populated it as much as it is populated.  There is not much to attract you there unless you were a farmer who wanted to squeeze in between the locals.

With "the Mideastern coast" I meant Carolinas and Georgia.

edit: And what about Colorado?
Mining (same thing for ID and MT btw).  The Orthodox presence goes back quite a ways because of that.
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,963



« Reply #24 on: May 23, 2012, 05:30:20 PM »

Faith Communities Today Survey (FACT) 2010, Orthodox Parishes
http://www.thearda.com/Archive/Files/Codebooks/FACT10OR_CB.asp
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
Ebor
Vanyar
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Posts: 6,424



« Reply #25 on: May 23, 2012, 07:22:15 PM »

The county I'm currently residing in is 1.0-4.99%  ... yay!  Smiley

Mine is 10-fold less than yours. I am curious about the upper tip of Idaho. Perhaps all it takes is one family.

I can explain that one for you as well as Montana, speaking as a Montanan-in-exile.  Wink

There aren't a lot of towns in the mountains. In that particular county, Boundary County, is the town of Bonners Ferry.  A quick check shows that there is an Antiochian Mission in Bonners Ferry, Holy Myrrh Bearing Women.  Now I have to make it plain that this county has only a bit over 10,000 people and Bonners Ferry has about 2,500.  So we're not talking a large population.  Since the colour is the .5-.99 percent it's more than one family and the photo looks to be around 40 adults or so. 

The other Idaho counties with colour are: Kootenai with a number of cities (what we call cities out there  Wink ) and towns including Coeur d'Alene and Post Falls; Boise with the capitol of Boise; Twin Falls with several towns including Twin Falls and Bannock county with Pocatello and some others including Lava Hot Springs which I recommend as a place to visit.

If you want an explanation about Montana I can do that too.

Ebor
Logged

"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

For some a world view is more like a neighborhood watch.
Ebor
Vanyar
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Posts: 6,424



« Reply #26 on: May 23, 2012, 07:25:34 PM »

It was mining that led to an EO presence in Butte in Silver Bow county, Montana which is the lightest colour/highest which is, like Boundary county Idaho the .5-.99%














Logged

"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

For some a world view is more like a neighborhood watch.
Ebor
Vanyar
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Posts: 6,424



« Reply #27 on: May 23, 2012, 07:34:45 PM »

Thank you but I'm less interested in demographics than in the historic and social factors that resulted in demographics. For example: why Florida is so popular among the Greeks and Alaska is not? Are there any favourite places for the Ethnic Orthodox? ...

Part of it, Michal, is where the population is. Out west, where I grew up, there are often long distances between cities/towns/small towns. There often aren't lots of jobs for in-comers and often children need to leave to find work. So there may not be a lot of growth.  So the higher numbers will most often be in places with larger towns.  When there are lower populations there is less chance of having an established or continuing parish. A few people of a particular ethnic group may come out, but perhaps not a lot.  The majority may stay in larger cities where there are numbers. Also some of the places have only been established for maybe 100-150 years. 

If you're interested we can discuss some more on this, particularly with regards to Montana.

Ebor
Logged

"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

For some a world view is more like a neighborhood watch.
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #28 on: May 25, 2012, 03:28:43 AM »

Thanks for your input.
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
Opus118
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1,613



« Reply #29 on: May 25, 2012, 11:22:14 AM »

The county I'm currently residing in is 1.0-4.99%  ... yay!  Smiley

Mine is 10-fold less than yours. I am curious about the upper tip of Idaho. Perhaps all it takes is one family.

I can explain that one for you as well as Montana, speaking as a Montanan-in-exile.  Wink

There aren't a lot of towns in the mountains. In that particular county, Boundary County, is the town of Bonners Ferry.  A quick check shows that there is an Antiochian Mission in Bonners Ferry, Holy Myrrh Bearing Women.  Now I have to make it plain that this county has only a bit over 10,000 people and Bonners Ferry has about 2,500.  So we're not talking a large population.  Since the colour is the .5-.99 percent it's more than one family and the photo looks to be around 40 adults or so. 

The other Idaho counties with colour are: Kootenai with a number of cities (what we call cities out there  Wink ) and towns including Coeur d'Alene and Post Falls; Boise with the capitol of Boise; Twin Falls with several towns including Twin Falls and Bannock county with Pocatello and some others including Lava Hot Springs which I recommend as a place to visit.

If you want an explanation about Montana I can do that too.

Ebor


Thanks Ebor. I just read that Holy Myrrhbearing Women Antiochian Orthodox Church was consecrated one year ago. They have 78 members in 37 families plus the 13 catechumens (and they brought 7 catechumens into the Church last year). The Church is between Bonners Ferry and Naples with a combined population of 4400. So the current catechumens represent 0.3% of the local population.
Logged
Ebor
Vanyar
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Posts: 6,424



« Reply #30 on: May 25, 2012, 10:28:11 PM »

Glad to be of help Opus118 and Michal, 

It helps knowing about what the land and people are like.  Reading the story of the parish in Bonners Ferry it didn't surprise me at all to read that there were people coming from Canada and other traveling hours.  That's normal for out home at least for the parts nearer to the border. 

At to Montana, as I wrote mining brought Serbians to Butte in the last 19th/early 20th Century and there is a quite established EO parish there that is about 108 years old.  The other counties in Montana are another story and I can tell you each one.

They're the counties with the largest cities: Billings, Great Falls, Missoula and Bozeman and the capital of Helana and people end up there for different reasons.  Missoula and Bozeman are the big university towns (therefore more in-comers, visitors, students etc).  Great Falls has a good sized Air Force base (that's how my family got out there) along with other things. The last I knew though, the Greek parish there hasn't had a priest in many years.  They import one 3-4 times a year.  Missoula also doesn't have a resident priest as far as I know. Billings is the largest city and it has a parish with an "attached" priest according to their web site.

The missions in Helena and Bozeman don't have a full time priest but have liturgy more regularly than Great Falls. It might be in the old West tradition of the "circuit-riding" priest/pastor/preacher.

So in the fourth largest state there are two parishes (as far as I know) with weekly services and that even with the missions there are people who are hundreds of miles and sometimes difficult drives from any form of EO presence.  Montana is about 250 south to north at its widest and more than 600 miles (1,000 Km +) from east to west) fyi.

I hope that is helpful, too.

Ebor
Logged

"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

For some a world view is more like a neighborhood watch.
Tags: numbers 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.123 seconds with 58 queries.