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Author Topic: This is fasting???  (Read 1501 times) Average Rating: 0
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KO63AP
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« on: November 03, 2004, 03:16:00 PM »

http://my.netscape.com/corewidgets/news/story.psp?cat=50900&id=2004110308390002657251

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Anastasios
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« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2004, 03:20:04 PM »

Well, to be fair, faithful Muslims give 20% of their income to the poor--and many Orthodox and Catholics won't even give 10%!*

Anastasios

* (If you are one of the people who really would like to give more but can't, please don't think you are the persons to whom I am referring).
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« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2004, 03:48:38 PM »

Quote
Well, to be fair, faithful Muslims give 20% of their income to the poor--and many Orthodox and Catholics won't even give 10%!*

Well, actually, that's really only for the Shi'ites, who consider the khums tax to apply to all income. Sunni Muslims (of which I was one for a time) only apply khums to things like treasure from the ground and war booty, so the only tax they pay on ordinary income is the zakah, which is 2.5 %.

As for gaining weight during Ramadan, I can believe it. You would not believe the feasts that Pakistani Muslim families put on. It was always difficult to pray the night prayer after one of those.
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Anastasios
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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2004, 03:54:55 PM »

wow, you used to be Muslim? Care to post a conversion story???

Anastasios
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« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2004, 04:08:35 PM »

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wow, you used to be Muslim? Care to post a conversion story???

Beayf,

If you are interested in posting such a story, I know that I would definitely be interested in hearing it as well!

In Christ,
Aaron
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gphadraig
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« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2004, 07:02:19 AM »

To eat or drink nothing at all during the hours of daylight must be rather difficult. As to whether one calls it fasting, for those who browse whatever the time of day or night I guess it would be............
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« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2004, 08:59:02 PM »

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wow, you used to be Muslim? Care to post a conversion story???

Sure, although it's not terribly exciting. Basically, I was raised Catholic by fairly devout parents, but early on rejected it, I think now because the church we went to was V2 all the way, hand-holding, accordion-playing nonsense. To me it was just silly. So for most of my adolescent years I was an atheist neopagan, but the summer before my senior year of high school I read the Qur'an, though "cool", and decided to convert. I was only Muslim for a year, and think of it as shock therapy getting me back into the habit of worshipping God, but when I went off to uni I pretty much ditched it, mainly because of its fundamentalistish features - it, or at least the non-Sufi variants, have very little depth of theology. So I meandered along for a while, attending a local Tridentine mass, until an Orthodox friend of mine took me to a divine liturgy, and from there I was hooked.
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« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2004, 10:37:18 PM »

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Sure, although it's not terribly exciting. Basically, I was raised Catholic by fairly devout parents, but early on rejected it, I think now because the church we went to was V2 all the way, hand-holding, accordion-playing nonsense.

I know exactly what you are talking about when you described your church and I nunderstand why that would be a turn off. That was big issue with me when I was considering becoming RC and I just couldn't even begin to think how I could put up with that at every Mass, because those kinds of things are fairly common in the Diocese of Joliet. The whole idea of trying to search out a church that actually followed the rubrics and had a reverent Mass was something that I felt that I shouldn't have to search for, it shouldn't even be an issue. I never felt as if I had just come from worship, it was more like some campy, hippie styled Lutheran liturgy, blech.  :-

Quote
So I meandered along for a while, attending a local Tridentine mass, until an Orthodox friend of mine took me to a divine liturgy, and from there I was hooked.

You sound like myself - when I first attended the Divine Liturgy it was totally different from anything I had ever participated in and it left me craving more and now here I am only 6 days away from being chrismated into the Holy Orthodox Church.

Thank you so much for sharing your story, may God bless you.

In Christ,
Aaron
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« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2011, 01:20:53 PM »

Quote
Sure, although it's not terribly exciting. Basically, I was raised Catholic by fairly devout parents, but early on rejected it, I think now because the church we went to was V2 all the way, hand-holding, accordion-playing nonsense.

I know exactly what you are talking about when you described your church and I nunderstand why that would be a turn off. That was big issue with me when I was considering becoming RC and I just couldn't even begin to think how I could put up with that at every Mass, because those kinds of things are fairly common in the Diocese of Joliet. The whole idea of trying to search out a church that actually followed the rubrics and had a reverent Mass was something that I felt that I shouldn't have to search for, it shouldn't even be an issue. I never felt as if I had just come from worship, it was more like some campy, hippie styled Lutheran liturgy, blech.  :-


Quote
So I meandered along for a while, attending a local Tridentine mass, until an Orthodox friend of mine took me to a divine liturgy, and from there I was hooked.

You sound like myself - when I first attended the Divine Liturgy it was totally different from anything I had ever participated in and it left me craving more and now here I am only 6 days away from being chrismated into the Holy Orthodox Church.

Thank you so much for sharing your story, may God bless you.

In Christ,
Aaron


I was prevatican II until everything changed when I was 14. then it seemed like a footrace to see how fast we could get silly. I have hung in and tried to get with the program for 46 years. I am inquiring and love what I see. Much the same in theory butwill less legalism and more faithful to tradition(large and small Tees)

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« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2011, 01:37:01 PM »

To eat or drink nothing at all during the hours of daylight must be rather difficult. As to whether one calls it fasting, for those who browse whatever the time of day or night I guess it would be............

I know plenty of Muslims who simply sleep as late as they can and essentially rearrange their schedule to avoid too much difficulty.  That's about as "fasty" as gorging on South Indian cuisine on Wednesdays and Fridays.
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« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2011, 01:40:19 PM »

To eat or drink nothing at all during the hours of daylight must be rather difficult. As to whether one calls it fasting, for those who browse whatever the time of day or night I guess it would be............

I know plenty of Muslims who simply sleep as late as they can and essentially rearrange their schedule to avoid too much difficulty.  That's about as "fasty" as gorging on South Indian cuisine on Wednesdays and Fridays.

I was going to say something about gorging on Thai food.
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« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2011, 01:51:50 PM »

To eat or drink nothing at all during the hours of daylight must be rather difficult. As to whether one calls it fasting, for those who browse whatever the time of day or night I guess it would be............

I know plenty of Muslims who simply sleep as late as they can and essentially rearrange their schedule to avoid too much difficulty.  That's about as "fasty" as gorging on South Indian cuisine on Wednesdays and Fridays.

I was going to say something about gorging on Thai food.

Mmmmm... tasty fasting...  Smiley  I think much of Thomas a Kempis' Imitation of Christ was about searching for and eating very flavorful fast-compliant foods. 
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