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Author Topic: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]  (Read 718 times) Average Rating: 0
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Jetavan
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« on: April 28, 2012, 11:06:53 AM »

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According to tradition, an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi from the province of Kafa was the first man to discover coffee. Born around the year 650, he lived during the waning years of the Christian Aksumite Empire. A husband, father of two daughters, and foster parent to an orphaned nephew, Kaldi one day noticed his flock of goats dancing energetically. He determined the cause of their peculiar behavior to be the red coffee drupes they nibbled off nearby bushes. He took some of the fruit home, and he and his family began experimenting with them for culinary use.

When his nephew, Giorgis, entered the local Orthodox monastery, he shared his family's coffee roasting recipe. The monks enjoyed the drink and soon made a habit of offering it to brothers visiting from other monasteries across Ethiopia. Eventually, word of the delightful drink reached the monasteries of the Byzantine Empire and, in time, the rest of the world.
....
In an effort both to defend the farmers' welfare and strengthen Ethiopia's agriculture industry as a whole, former World Bank economist Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin in 2008 established the country's first commodities market: the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX).

Though much remains to be done to protect small farmers and expand Ethiopia's agriculture, the ECX has already made major headway in its first few years. It now requires, for instance, traders make more accessible to small farmers information about the market, which in the past they kept to themselves.
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2012, 11:35:50 AM »

I tried some Ethiopian coffee for the first time yesterday morning. I don't know how authentically Ethiopian it was, but I could not sleep until 4 AM.
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« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2012, 12:27:59 PM »

I tried some Ethiopian coffee for the first time yesterday morning. I don't know how authentically Ethiopian it was, but I could not sleep until 4 AM.

 Cheesy
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« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2012, 01:02:26 PM »

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According to tradition, an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi from the province of Kafa was the first man to discover coffee. Born around the year 650, he lived during the waning years of the Christian Aksumite Empire. A husband, father of two daughters, and foster parent to an orphaned nephew, Kaldi one day noticed his flock of goats dancing energetically. He determined the cause of their peculiar behavior to be the red coffee drupes they nibbled off nearby bushes. He took some of the fruit home, and he and his family began experimenting with them for culinary use.

When his nephew, Giorgis, entered the local Orthodox monastery, he shared his family's coffee roasting recipe. The monks enjoyed the drink and soon made a habit of offering it to brothers visiting from other monasteries across Ethiopia. Eventually, word of the delightful drink reached the monasteries of the Byzantine Empire and, in time, the rest of the world.
....
In an effort both to defend the farmers' welfare and strengthen Ethiopia's agriculture industry as a whole, former World Bank economist Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin in 2008 established the country's first commodities market: the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX).

Though much remains to be done to protect small farmers and expand Ethiopia's agriculture, the ECX has already made major headway in its first few years. It now requires, for instance, traders make more accessible to small farmers information about the market, which in the past they kept to themselves.
Does this mean that Christians (specifically, Oriental Orthodox Christians) invented coffee?
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HabteSelassie
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« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2012, 01:50:16 PM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Ethiopian coffee is superb, it is simply coffee the way God created it.  Biologically speaking, coffee originated in Ethiopia where it is indigenous.  All the other places that grow great coffee, places like Colombia, Brazil, Guatemala, Jamaica, all these places merely duplicate the climate, elevation, and soil types of Kaffa Ethiopia where coffee both originates and gets its name.  In fact, upwards of half the coffee produced in Ethiopia is still WILD!  For these reasons Ethiopian coffee is the most flavorful, aromatic, and satisfying.  In regards to it being "strong" that is just about who brewed your cup.  Ethiopians themselves make it rather strong if you have a small cup of coffee in "the coffee ceremony" (ye buna afelal) but if you buy a bag of Sidamo or Yergecheffe beans at the grocery store, it actually has less caffeine then an Italian roast but tastes much stronger, more floral.  Caffeine content in brewed coffee is largely determined by the roasting process.  


Quote
According to tradition, an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi from the province of Kafa was the first man to discover coffee. Born around the year 650, he lived during the waning years of the Christian Aksumite Empire. A husband, father of two daughters, and foster parent to an orphaned nephew, Kaldi one day noticed his flock of goats dancing energetically. He determined the cause of their peculiar behavior to be the red coffee drupes they nibbled off nearby bushes. He took some of the fruit home, and he and his family began experimenting with them for culinary use.

When his nephew, Giorgis, entered the local Orthodox monastery, he shared his family's coffee roasting recipe. The monks enjoyed the drink and soon made a habit of offering it to brothers visiting from other monasteries across Ethiopia. Eventually, word of the delightful drink reached the monasteries of the Byzantine Empire and, in time, the rest of the world.
....
In an effort both to defend the farmers' welfare and strengthen Ethiopia's agriculture industry as a whole, former World Bank economist Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin in 2008 established the country's first commodities market: the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX).

Though much remains to be done to protect small farmers and expand Ethiopia's agriculture, the ECX has already made major headway in its first few years. It now requires, for instance, traders make more accessible to small farmers information about the market, which in the past they kept to themselves.
Does this mean that Christians (specifically, Oriental Orthodox Christians) invented coffee?

Yes, but how did coffee become a world drink is related to the Latins.  Just as with chocolate from the New World, it was papal decrees which led to the popularity of coffee, which initially was only drunken in the Muslim world (including in Ethiopia, the Christians didn't develop a taste for it initially).  When the popes approved coffee as an acceptable drink for Lent and fasting days, just like chocolate, it exploded as a viable Fasting treat.  Lent has this affect on the world economy.  Coffee and chocolate are two of the most widely consumed commodities, I think only rice is consumed more than coffee worldwide, and both became popular in their relation to Lent and fasting culture. 

stay blessed,
habte selassie
« Last Edit: April 28, 2012, 01:54:07 PM by HabteSelassie » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2012, 07:29:05 PM »

I tried some Ethiopian coffee for the first time yesterday morning. I don't know how authentically Ethiopian it was, but I could not sleep until 4 AM.

hehehe that does sound like a very authentic ethiopian coffee
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2012, 09:14:45 PM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Ethiopian coffee is superb, it is simply coffee the way God created it.  Biologically speaking, coffee originated in Ethiopia where it is indigenous.  All the other places that grow great coffee, places like Colombia, Brazil, Guatemala, Jamaica, all these places merely duplicate the climate, elevation, and soil types of Kaffa Ethiopia where coffee both originates and gets its name.  In fact, upwards of half the coffee produced in Ethiopia is still WILD!  For these reasons Ethiopian coffee is the most flavorful, aromatic, and satisfying.  In regards to it being "strong" that is just about who brewed your cup.  Ethiopians themselves make it rather strong if you have a small cup of coffee in "the coffee ceremony" (ye buna afelal) but if you buy a bag of Sidamo or Yergecheffe beans at the grocery store, it actually has less caffeine then an Italian roast but tastes much stronger, more floral.  Caffeine content in brewed coffee is largely determined by the roasting process.  


Quote
According to tradition, an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi from the province of Kafa was the first man to discover coffee. Born around the year 650, he lived during the waning years of the Christian Aksumite Empire. A husband, father of two daughters, and foster parent to an orphaned nephew, Kaldi one day noticed his flock of goats dancing energetically. He determined the cause of their peculiar behavior to be the red coffee drupes they nibbled off nearby bushes. He took some of the fruit home, and he and his family began experimenting with them for culinary use.

When his nephew, Giorgis, entered the local Orthodox monastery, he shared his family's coffee roasting recipe. The monks enjoyed the drink and soon made a habit of offering it to brothers visiting from other monasteries across Ethiopia. Eventually, word of the delightful drink reached the monasteries of the Byzantine Empire and, in time, the rest of the world.
....
In an effort both to defend the farmers' welfare and strengthen Ethiopia's agriculture industry as a whole, former World Bank economist Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin in 2008 established the country's first commodities market: the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX).

Though much remains to be done to protect small farmers and expand Ethiopia's agriculture, the ECX has already made major headway in its first few years. It now requires, for instance, traders make more accessible to small farmers information about the market, which in the past they kept to themselves.
Does this mean that Christians (specifically, Oriental Orthodox Christians) invented coffee?

Yes, but how did coffee become a world drink is related to the Latins.  Just as with chocolate from the New World, it was papal decrees which led to the popularity of coffee, which initially was only drunken in the Muslim world (including in Ethiopia, the Christians didn't develop a taste for it initially).  When the popes approved coffee as an acceptable drink for Lent and fasting days, just like chocolate, it exploded as a viable Fasting treat.  Lent has this affect on the world economy.  Coffee and chocolate are two of the most widely consumed commodities, I think only rice is consumed more than coffee worldwide, and both became popular in their relation to Lent and fasting culture. 

stay blessed,
habte selassie
No, it is due to the Orthodox even in Western Europe: Jerzy Franciszek Kulczycki, a Romanian-Ukrainian Orthodox of the Polish nobility, founded the first café in Vienna with the beans left by the retreating Turks from the seige.
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« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2012, 10:13:59 AM »

Thread resurrection!

What makes Ethiopian coffee Ethiopian? How it is prepared and served?
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HabteSelassie
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« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2012, 05:21:54 PM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Thread resurrection!

What makes Ethiopian coffee Ethiopian? How it is prepared and served?

No, where it comes from.  Ethiopian coffee is from Ethiopia the American brand names of Sidamo, Yirgecheffe, or Limu are all in reference to coffee producing regions in Ethiopia.  The Ethiopians do indeed have their own ways of roasting and preparing coffee which is as superb as the coffee itself, but stand alone beans from Ethiopia are perhaps the most flavorful in the world.  From my experience, only the Brazil Santos can compete for floral and nutty complexity, but that coffee is roasted in a peculiar manner which can only be done in that region of Brazil and doesn't seem to work anywhere else in the world. Pure Kona coffee from Hawaii is good too, but that is the benefit of high altitude, tropical, volcanic soil which is the same conditions as are found in Kaffa and Sidamo Ethiopia where coffee first originated Smiley

stay blessed,
habte selassie
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« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2012, 12:33:06 AM »

It is almost as if there is an agent for Peet's coffee here. They are selling what they call "Ethiopian Super Natural" from Sept 10-28:

This extraordinary coffee has been a customer favorite since its introduction in 2006 and we scour the Ethiopian country side each year searching for lots worthy of the ‘Super Natural’ title.

The intense flavors found in this cup are a result of the unusual processing elements sometimes used in the Sidamo region of Ethiopia. The cherries are picked ripe and are carefully spread on raised "African beds," or drying tables, where they dry for three weeks. During the drying process, the cherries first soften and become pungent, before hardening with intensely concentrated sugars. The prolonged contact between the cherry and bean imparts the incredible wild and fruity flavor that distinguishes this coffee. After the extended drying period, the outer fruit is milled from the beans.
  http://www.peets.com/shop/coffee_detail.asp?id=1323&cid=1000040&cm_re=hp-_-billboard-_-Link1

I do not particularly care for Ethiopian and the $20/lb is out of my price range.

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