Author Topic: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]  (Read 2798 times)

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Offline Jetavan

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Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« on: April 28, 2012, 11:06:53 AM »
Quote
According to tradition, an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi from the province of Kafa was the first man to discover coffee. Born around the year 650, he lived during the waning years of the Christian Aksumite Empire. A husband, father of two daughters, and foster parent to an orphaned nephew, Kaldi one day noticed his flock of goats dancing energetically. He determined the cause of their peculiar behavior to be the red coffee drupes they nibbled off nearby bushes. He took some of the fruit home, and he and his family began experimenting with them for culinary use.

When his nephew, Giorgis, entered the local Orthodox monastery, he shared his family's coffee roasting recipe. The monks enjoyed the drink and soon made a habit of offering it to brothers visiting from other monasteries across Ethiopia. Eventually, word of the delightful drink reached the monasteries of the Byzantine Empire and, in time, the rest of the world.
....
In an effort both to defend the farmers' welfare and strengthen Ethiopia's agriculture industry as a whole, former World Bank economist Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin in 2008 established the country's first commodities market: the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX).

Though much remains to be done to protect small farmers and expand Ethiopia's agriculture, the ECX has already made major headway in its first few years. It now requires, for instance, traders make more accessible to small farmers information about the market, which in the past they kept to themselves.
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Offline Rufus

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2012, 11:35:50 AM »
I tried some Ethiopian coffee for the first time yesterday morning. I don't know how authentically Ethiopian it was, but I could not sleep until 4 AM.

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2012, 12:27:59 PM »
I tried some Ethiopian coffee for the first time yesterday morning. I don't know how authentically Ethiopian it was, but I could not sleep until 4 AM.

 :D

I'm going to need this.

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2012, 01:02:26 PM »
Quote
According to tradition, an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi from the province of Kafa was the first man to discover coffee. Born around the year 650, he lived during the waning years of the Christian Aksumite Empire. A husband, father of two daughters, and foster parent to an orphaned nephew, Kaldi one day noticed his flock of goats dancing energetically. He determined the cause of their peculiar behavior to be the red coffee drupes they nibbled off nearby bushes. He took some of the fruit home, and he and his family began experimenting with them for culinary use.

When his nephew, Giorgis, entered the local Orthodox monastery, he shared his family's coffee roasting recipe. The monks enjoyed the drink and soon made a habit of offering it to brothers visiting from other monasteries across Ethiopia. Eventually, word of the delightful drink reached the monasteries of the Byzantine Empire and, in time, the rest of the world.
....
In an effort both to defend the farmers' welfare and strengthen Ethiopia's agriculture industry as a whole, former World Bank economist Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin in 2008 established the country's first commodities market: the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX).

Though much remains to be done to protect small farmers and expand Ethiopia's agriculture, the ECX has already made major headway in its first few years. It now requires, for instance, traders make more accessible to small farmers information about the market, which in the past they kept to themselves.
Does this mean that Christians (specifically, Oriental Orthodox Christians) invented coffee?
If you will, you can become all flame.
Extra caritatem nulla salus.
In order to become whole, take the "I" out of "holiness".
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"Those who say religion has nothing to do with politics do not know what religion is." -- Mohandas Gandhi
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Offline HabteSelassie

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2012, 01:50:16 PM »
Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Ethiopian coffee is superb, it is simply coffee the way God created it.  Biologically speaking, coffee originated in Ethiopia where it is indigenous.  All the other places that grow great coffee, places like Colombia, Brazil, Guatemala, Jamaica, all these places merely duplicate the climate, elevation, and soil types of Kaffa Ethiopia where coffee both originates and gets its name.  In fact, upwards of half the coffee produced in Ethiopia is still WILD!  For these reasons Ethiopian coffee is the most flavorful, aromatic, and satisfying.  In regards to it being "strong" that is just about who brewed your cup.  Ethiopians themselves make it rather strong if you have a small cup of coffee in "the coffee ceremony" (ye buna afelal) but if you buy a bag of Sidamo or Yergecheffe beans at the grocery store, it actually has less caffeine then an Italian roast but tastes much stronger, more floral.  Caffeine content in brewed coffee is largely determined by the roasting process.  


Quote
According to tradition, an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi from the province of Kafa was the first man to discover coffee. Born around the year 650, he lived during the waning years of the Christian Aksumite Empire. A husband, father of two daughters, and foster parent to an orphaned nephew, Kaldi one day noticed his flock of goats dancing energetically. He determined the cause of their peculiar behavior to be the red coffee drupes they nibbled off nearby bushes. He took some of the fruit home, and he and his family began experimenting with them for culinary use.

When his nephew, Giorgis, entered the local Orthodox monastery, he shared his family's coffee roasting recipe. The monks enjoyed the drink and soon made a habit of offering it to brothers visiting from other monasteries across Ethiopia. Eventually, word of the delightful drink reached the monasteries of the Byzantine Empire and, in time, the rest of the world.
....
In an effort both to defend the farmers' welfare and strengthen Ethiopia's agriculture industry as a whole, former World Bank economist Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin in 2008 established the country's first commodities market: the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX).

Though much remains to be done to protect small farmers and expand Ethiopia's agriculture, the ECX has already made major headway in its first few years. It now requires, for instance, traders make more accessible to small farmers information about the market, which in the past they kept to themselves.
Does this mean that Christians (specifically, Oriental Orthodox Christians) invented coffee?

Yes, but how did coffee become a world drink is related to the Latins.  Just as with chocolate from the New World, it was papal decrees which led to the popularity of coffee, which initially was only drunken in the Muslim world (including in Ethiopia, the Christians didn't develop a taste for it initially).  When the popes approved coffee as an acceptable drink for Lent and fasting days, just like chocolate, it exploded as a viable Fasting treat.  Lent has this affect on the world economy.  Coffee and chocolate are two of the most widely consumed commodities, I think only rice is consumed more than coffee worldwide, and both became popular in their relation to Lent and fasting culture. 

stay blessed,
habte selassie
« Last Edit: April 28, 2012, 01:54:07 PM by HabteSelassie »
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Offline bytania

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2012, 07:29:05 PM »
I tried some Ethiopian coffee for the first time yesterday morning. I don't know how authentically Ethiopian it was, but I could not sleep until 4 AM.

hehehe that does sound like a very authentic ethiopian coffee
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Offline ialmisry

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2012, 09:14:45 PM »
Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Ethiopian coffee is superb, it is simply coffee the way God created it.  Biologically speaking, coffee originated in Ethiopia where it is indigenous.  All the other places that grow great coffee, places like Colombia, Brazil, Guatemala, Jamaica, all these places merely duplicate the climate, elevation, and soil types of Kaffa Ethiopia where coffee both originates and gets its name.  In fact, upwards of half the coffee produced in Ethiopia is still WILD!  For these reasons Ethiopian coffee is the most flavorful, aromatic, and satisfying.  In regards to it being "strong" that is just about who brewed your cup.  Ethiopians themselves make it rather strong if you have a small cup of coffee in "the coffee ceremony" (ye buna afelal) but if you buy a bag of Sidamo or Yergecheffe beans at the grocery store, it actually has less caffeine then an Italian roast but tastes much stronger, more floral.  Caffeine content in brewed coffee is largely determined by the roasting process.  


Quote
According to tradition, an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi from the province of Kafa was the first man to discover coffee. Born around the year 650, he lived during the waning years of the Christian Aksumite Empire. A husband, father of two daughters, and foster parent to an orphaned nephew, Kaldi one day noticed his flock of goats dancing energetically. He determined the cause of their peculiar behavior to be the red coffee drupes they nibbled off nearby bushes. He took some of the fruit home, and he and his family began experimenting with them for culinary use.

When his nephew, Giorgis, entered the local Orthodox monastery, he shared his family's coffee roasting recipe. The monks enjoyed the drink and soon made a habit of offering it to brothers visiting from other monasteries across Ethiopia. Eventually, word of the delightful drink reached the monasteries of the Byzantine Empire and, in time, the rest of the world.
....
In an effort both to defend the farmers' welfare and strengthen Ethiopia's agriculture industry as a whole, former World Bank economist Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin in 2008 established the country's first commodities market: the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX).

Though much remains to be done to protect small farmers and expand Ethiopia's agriculture, the ECX has already made major headway in its first few years. It now requires, for instance, traders make more accessible to small farmers information about the market, which in the past they kept to themselves.
Does this mean that Christians (specifically, Oriental Orthodox Christians) invented coffee?

Yes, but how did coffee become a world drink is related to the Latins.  Just as with chocolate from the New World, it was papal decrees which led to the popularity of coffee, which initially was only drunken in the Muslim world (including in Ethiopia, the Christians didn't develop a taste for it initially).  When the popes approved coffee as an acceptable drink for Lent and fasting days, just like chocolate, it exploded as a viable Fasting treat.  Lent has this affect on the world economy.  Coffee and chocolate are two of the most widely consumed commodities, I think only rice is consumed more than coffee worldwide, and both became popular in their relation to Lent and fasting culture. 

stay blessed,
habte selassie
No, it is due to the Orthodox even in Western Europe: Jerzy Franciszek Kulczycki, a Romanian-Ukrainian Orthodox of the Polish nobility, founded the first café in Vienna with the beans left by the retreating Turks from the seige.
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Offline Alpo

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2012, 10:13:59 AM »
Thread resurrection!

What makes Ethiopian coffee Ethiopian? How it is prepared and served?
But the stranger that dwelleth with you shall be unto you as one born among you, and thou shalt love him as thyself; for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt: I am the LORD your God.
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Offline HabteSelassie

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2012, 05:21:54 PM »
Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Thread resurrection!

What makes Ethiopian coffee Ethiopian? How it is prepared and served?

No, where it comes from.  Ethiopian coffee is from Ethiopia the American brand names of Sidamo, Yirgecheffe, or Limu are all in reference to coffee producing regions in Ethiopia.  The Ethiopians do indeed have their own ways of roasting and preparing coffee which is as superb as the coffee itself, but stand alone beans from Ethiopia are perhaps the most flavorful in the world.  From my experience, only the Brazil Santos can compete for floral and nutty complexity, but that coffee is roasted in a peculiar manner which can only be done in that region of Brazil and doesn't seem to work anywhere else in the world. Pure Kona coffee from Hawaii is good too, but that is the benefit of high altitude, tropical, volcanic soil which is the same conditions as are found in Kaffa and Sidamo Ethiopia where coffee first originated :)

stay blessed,
habte selassie
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Offline Opus118

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2012, 12:33:06 AM »
It is almost as if there is an agent for Peet's coffee here. They are selling what they call "Ethiopian Super Natural" from Sept 10-28:

This extraordinary coffee has been a customer favorite since its introduction in 2006 and we scour the Ethiopian country side each year searching for lots worthy of the ‘Super Natural’ title.

The intense flavors found in this cup are a result of the unusual processing elements sometimes used in the Sidamo region of Ethiopia. The cherries are picked ripe and are carefully spread on raised "African beds," or drying tables, where they dry for three weeks. During the drying process, the cherries first soften and become pungent, before hardening with intensely concentrated sugars. The prolonged contact between the cherry and bean imparts the incredible wild and fruity flavor that distinguishes this coffee. After the extended drying period, the outer fruit is milled from the beans.
  http://www.peets.com/shop/coffee_detail.asp?id=1323&cid=1000040&cm_re=hp-_-billboard-_-Link1

I do not particularly care for Ethiopian and the $20/lb is out of my price range.

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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2017, 06:11:04 PM »
I love Ethiopian coffee. It is my favorite of all coffees, because it is so dark and chocolately.

I agree with Habte too:
Biologically speaking, coffee originated in Ethiopia where it is indigenous.  All the other places that grow great coffee, places like Colombia, Brazil, Guatemala, Jamaica, all these places merely duplicate the climate, elevation, and soil types of Kaffa Ethiopia where coffee both originates and gets its name.  In fact, upwards of half the coffee produced in Ethiopia is still WILD!  For these reasons Ethiopian coffee is the most flavorful, aromatic, and satisfying.
Yes!
 :) :angel:

I have a habit of drinking caffeine every morning. We have coffee always at our parish meals after the Meal, we even call it "coffee hour".


  In regards to it being "strong" that is just about who brewed your cup.  Ethiopians themselves make it rather strong if you have a small cup of coffee in "the coffee ceremony" (ye buna afelal) but if you buy a bag of Sidamo or Yergecheffe beans at the grocery store, it actually has less caffeine then an Italian roast but tastes much stronger, more floral.
This sounds interesting.
Quote

Transformation of the spirit is said to take place during the coffee ceremony through the completion three rounds of drinking: ‘Abol’ (the first round), ‘Tona’ (second round) and ‘Baraka’ (third round) which means blessing.
...
Traditionally in Ethiopia, it is only women who make the coffee and part of the ritual is to praise their coffee making ability. Women in Ethiopian households invite family and neighbors for coffee, calling out “Buna Derswal!” (The Coffee is ready).

At KafaBuna, at special times our guests enjoy a rarely seen ritual that is still practiced in most Ethiopian households, the traditional Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony.



One Ethiopian website says:
Quote
The coffee ceremony is set up around a "rekbot" - a shelf-like box furniture that serves as the staging platform for the coffee making. The rekbot is arranged upon a bed of long scented grasses and flowers. The ceremony hostess is usually a young woman, dressed in the traditional Ethiopian white cotton garment with colored woven borders. The roasting of the coffee beans is done in a flat pan over a tiny charcoal stove, or a gas stove if necessary, the rich, nutty smell mingling with the heady aroma of frankincense and myrrh that is always burned during the ceremony.
http://bunnaethiopia.net/coffee_ceremony.html

I know people who don't like the taste of coffee, but love the smell. I can see that with frankincense it must be even better smelling.

Quote
No one I ask seems to have an explanation for the accompanying frankincense burning ritual. I wonder if it has anything to do with a belief that one of the three wise men is said to have been Ethiopian.
https://munchies.vice.com/en/articles/jebena-buna-is-the-only-way-to-drink-ethiopian-coffee

Quote
For the ceremony the coffee is transferred to a different more presentable jebena and poured into tiny cups on a decorative table accompanied by burning frankincense to enhance the taste of the coffee.
http://www.blogto.com/cafes/buna-soul-of-coffee-toronto/

May I please ask if someone knows why the frankincense is used? Does it affect the taste?

Quote
The grounds are brewed three times: the first round of coffee is called awel in Tigrinya, the second kale'i and the third baraka ('to be blessed').[4] The coffee ceremony may also include burning of various traditional incense.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_ceremony
One time I made coffee for a friend in an Arabic pot I brought and the friend asked me if I was going to brew it three times. I had no idea what he meant. Do you think the threesome brewing improves the taste?

Peace.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2017, 06:11:22 PM by rakovsky »
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2017, 01:23:20 PM »

(Click to enlarge)

Nekemte, Wellega, Jimma, Limu, Bebeka, Tepi, Bench Maji, and Kaffa are the "Forest and Semi-Forest Coffee"


Gimbi, Lekempti are in the forest region too


Collecting wild coffee in Kaffa


Origin of Robusta coffee

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Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2017, 02:23:51 PM »
I had some Ethiopian coffee when I was in NY, it was the only good coffee I had there.
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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2017, 03:55:04 PM »
I had robusta coffee for the first time last year, in Borneo, where my grandfather's bicycle shop is now a coffee shop. I greatly prefer it to the Arabica coffee.
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2017, 04:10:47 PM »
My Favorites:
Dark/French roast
Espresso
Turkish/Greek method (boiling fine ground bits in a metal cup)
Moka method (uses espresso ground bits)
Ethiopian
« Last Edit: October 05, 2017, 04:12:27 PM by rakovsky »
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Offline juliogb

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2017, 07:44:33 AM »
I had some Ethiopian coffee when I was in NY, it was the only good coffee I had there.

Is it similar to our brazilian coffee? In my home I usually make the arabic style coffee with cardamom or traditional brazilian coffee ''coado no pano'', my 2 favorite kinds of coffee preparation.

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2017, 12:10:43 AM »
I had robusta coffee for the first time last year, in Borneo, where my grandfather's bicycle shop is now a coffee shop. I greatly prefer it to the Arabica coffee.

AFAIK robusta coffees are also generally cheaper than arabica coffees so consider yourself lucky to have a taste like that. Around here when the major roasteries want to give supposedly premium feel and higher price to their products aside from the fancier package they also emphasize using only arabica beans.
But the stranger that dwelleth with you shall be unto you as one born among you, and thou shalt love him as thyself; for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt: I am the LORD your God.
Leviticus 19:34

Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #17 on: October 11, 2017, 03:11:44 AM »
Is it similar to our brazilian coffee? In my home I usually make the arabic style coffee with cardamom or traditional brazilian coffee ''coado no pano'', my 2 favorite kinds of coffee preparation.
I can't really describe the difference, but it's discernable. Ours is much thicker, spicier and sourer, for starters. The Ethiopian coffee I had was very smooth and had a distinct perfume. Not coffee perfume, but still something natural, like flowers.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2017, 03:14:00 AM by RaphaCam »
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Offline juliogb

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #18 on: October 11, 2017, 07:07:26 AM »
Is it similar to our brazilian coffee? In my home I usually make the arabic style coffee with cardamom or traditional brazilian coffee ''coado no pano'', my 2 favorite kinds of coffee preparation.
I can't really describe the difference, but it's discernable. Ours is much thicker, spicier and sourer, for starters. The Ethiopian coffee I had was very smooth and had a distinct perfume. Not coffee perfume, but still something natural, like flowers.


Flowers? Wasn't the cardamom? the arabs I know put so many cardamom in the coffee that tastes quite diferent from average coffee.

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #19 on: October 11, 2017, 09:59:59 AM »
Not really, it was a flowery thing, but still natural. I have tasted something similar in Italian espresso. Never had coffee with cardamom, but I love both coffee and cardamom, so...
« Last Edit: October 11, 2017, 10:00:40 AM by RaphaCam »
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Offline juliogb

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #20 on: October 11, 2017, 12:34:20 PM »
Not really, it was a flowery thing, but still natural. I have tasted something similar in Italian espresso. Never had coffee with cardamom, but I love both coffee and cardamom, so...

I received a gift recently from my uncle, 1 kg of a coffee beads from southern Minas Gerais, it is naturally sweet and doesnt taste like average coffee as well.

I never had a real italian expresso so I cant say, Im only acquainted to brazilian and arabic coffee.

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #21 on: October 11, 2017, 02:40:45 PM »
Yeah, the Ethiopian coffee, some of its versions at least, has been described that way as fruity, flowery, honey. If someone drinks tons of coffee of different varities they can say that there are different "tones" or "flavors" inside each, like "flowers", "honey", etc. Wine tasters say something similar with wine.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2017, 02:41:28 PM by rakovsky »
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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #22 on: October 11, 2017, 02:47:41 PM »
It's been said that Mor Ephrem loves Ethiopian coffee more than any other.
You sound like a professional who knows what he's talking about.  That's because you are.

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Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2017, 12:44:30 AM »
It's been said that Mor Ephrem loves Ethiopian coffee more than any other.
In an Armenian mug?
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Offline augustin717

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2017, 01:17:43 AM »
My Favorites:
Dark/French roast
Espresso
Turkish/Greek method (boiling fine ground bits in a metal cup)
Moka method (uses espresso ground bits)
Ethiopian
I hate being too nitpicky  but if you wanna make Turkish coffee it's better not to boil it. Just as slowly as possible heat it up very close to the boiling point but don't boil it. It's gonna lose the 'caimac'
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A voice that cries, “The tomb in Palestine
Is not the porch of spirits lingering.
It is the grave of Jesus, where he lay.”
We live in an old chaos of the sun,
Or old dependency of day and night,
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Offline NicholasMyra

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2017, 01:27:50 AM »
Ethiopian is the best.
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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2017, 01:47:36 AM »
Ethiopian is the best.

Nah. Kenyan is better.
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2017, 12:32:23 PM »
Ethiopian is the best.

Nah. Kenyan is better.
Quote
Endemic to the mountainous regions of Yemen and the southwestern highlands of Ethiopia, C. arabica is now rare in Ethiopia, while many populations appear to be of mixed native and planted trees. In Ethiopia, where it is called būna, it is commonly used as an understorey shrub. It has also been recovered from the Boma Plateau in South Sudan. C. arabica is also found on Mount Marsabit in northern Kenya, but it is unclear whether this is a truly native or naturalised occurrence
Source: Wikipedia, C. Arabica


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Offline NicholasMyra

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2017, 08:14:02 PM »
I am referring to style rather than subspecies or cultivar.
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2017, 10:54:37 PM »
I am referring to style rather than subspecies or cultivar.

Can you explain more?
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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #30 on: October 13, 2017, 11:55:29 PM »
I am referring to style rather than subspecies or cultivar.

Can you explain more?
As I've had it, the Ethiopian coffee method involves fresh, lightly roasted beans, very long steep times at a lower temperature, and a high coffee/water ratio.

Under these conditions, coffee can be almost as good as cheap tea, which is a feat.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 11:56:36 PM by NicholasMyra »
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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2017, 12:24:29 AM »
Speaking of lightly roasted tealike coffee, I got green ungrounded unroasted coffee beans and boiled them for a quite long time as the seller recommended. He claimed it was a sudanese method. It reminded me of a green tea version of coffee. I did not like it.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 12:25:47 AM by rakovsky »
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Offline juliogb

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Re: Brewed to Perfection [Ethiopia and Coffee]
« Reply #32 on: Yesterday at 06:16:32 AM »
Speaking of lightly roasted tealike coffee, I got green ungrounded unroasted coffee beans and boiled them for a quite long time as the seller recommended. He claimed it was a sudanese method. It reminded me of a green tea version of coffee. I did not like it.


Well, green coffee smells like some sort of bean, doesn't remember coffee smell at first, just after roasting the tipical coffee smell starts.