OrthodoxChristianity.net
October 31, 2014, 07:39:56 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Monastic ponytails (AKA monkeytails)  (Read 4849 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
William
Muted
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 4,354


« on: May 05, 2013, 09:51:22 PM »

Why do monks style their hair into ponytails? Is it because they are not supposed to cut their hair so a monkeytail is easier to work with or is there some type of religious symbolism? Is it a sin to cut a monkeytail like it is with beards?
Logged

Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,304


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2013, 09:55:13 PM »

Why do monks style their hair into ponytails? Is it because they are not supposed to cut their hair so a monkeytail is easier to work with or is there some type of religious symbolism? Is it a sin to cut a monkeytail like it is with beards?

Is it a sin to cut a beard? If my husband does not trim his beard, it gets all tangled into dread locks.
Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
JamesR
Virginal Chicano Blood
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox (but doubtful)
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Church *of* America
Posts: 5,774


St. Augustine of Hippo pray for me!


« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2013, 09:55:45 PM »

I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair. Either way, those monkey-tails are rather stylish and I've always wanted one, I tried growing my hair out about a year ago, but, I lacked the discipline to follow through. My hair began to look too ungroomed and sloppy, so, I cut it Sad Any tips for growing a monkey tail?
Logged

Quote
You're really on to something here. Tattoo to keep you from masturbating, chew to keep you from fornicating... it's a whole new world where you outsource your crosses. You're like a Christian entrepreneur or something.
Quote
James, you have problemz.
William
Muted
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 4,354


« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2013, 09:59:52 PM »

I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair. Either way, those monkey-tails are rather stylish and I've always wanted one, I tried growing my hair out about a year ago, but, I lacked the discipline to follow through. My hair began to look too ungroomed and sloppy, so, I cut it Sad Any tips for growing a monkey tail?

Yes, we need some explanations about this verse: "Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him?" (1 Corinthians 11:14), especially considering how long hair is more or less a prerequisite for sainthood for Orthodox if icons are to be believed.

I plan on undertaking this spiritual journey of growing the monkeytail. I'll let you know. Not sure how I'll deal with the ungroomed hippie look, though.
Logged

Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant
Punch
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: Body of Christ
Posts: 5,590



« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2013, 10:28:31 PM »

Consider the times when Paul wrote, and to whom.  He was not writing to monks on Mt. Athos or Vaalam, but to Greeks who, along with Romans, had a history of homosexuality and effeminate looks.  If you read later canons regarding beards, they say "if a man shaves his face to please other men, he is an abomination to God".  The key there is not the shaving, but "to please other men".  I believe that this is along the same lines as to what Paul was telling the Corinthians.  Men are not to try to look like women, and women are not to try to look like men.  This is what I have always been taught.  However, I am always interested in learning something different - as long as it is true.  I am guessing that someone would have to be pretty blind to mistake any of the below monks for women.
Logged

I would be happy to agree with you, but then both of us would be wrong.
Seraphim98
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 566



« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2013, 11:08:02 PM »

It is my understanding that the long hair of monastics is rooted in the nazarite tradition…those like St. John the Forerunner who live an aescetical life set aside unto the service of God.  The nazarites did not cut their hair during the time of their vow. Some nazarites, like St. John lived their whole life vowed unto God.
Logged
Cantor Krishnich
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Jurisdiction: Pan-Orthodox Christianity
Posts: 545


Mar Ahmed the Daftadar


« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2013, 11:45:55 PM »

Why do monks style their hair into ponytails? Is it because they are not supposed to cut their hair so a monkeytail is easier to work with or is there some type of religious symbolism? Is it a sin to cut a monkeytail like it is with beards?

monkeytails...lol.
Its not a sin for monks to cut their beards or their hair. However, they strictly refrain from cutting their beards and other hairs.
Logged

Most Holy Theotokos, Save Us!
Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, Have Mercy Upon Me a Sinner!
LBK
Warned
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 11,259


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us!


« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2013, 02:40:16 AM »

Quote
I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair.

No, St Paul did not say long. The Greek word he used does not mean long, it means coiffed, primped, styled.

Wish more folks were aware of this distinction - after all, Christ Himself as an adult had long hair, as attested to consistently and unwaveringly in iconography.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2013, 02:40:32 AM by LBK » Logged
Shanghaiski
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 7,973


Holy Trinity Church of Gergeti, Georgia


« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2013, 10:52:37 AM »

If you asked a monk why he styles his hair that way, he would probably laugh at you. Monks do not style their hair. Monks are not into worldly fashion.

Now we'll get stupid videos and pictures and dumb anecdotal rebuttals.
Logged

Quote from: GabrieltheCelt
If you spend long enough on this forum, you'll come away with all sorts of weird, untrue ideas of Orthodox Christianity.
Quote from: orthonorm
I would suggest most persons in general avoid any question beginning with why.
Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 6,889



« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2013, 10:54:46 AM »

Any tips for growing a monkey tail?

Patience.
Logged

Schultz
Christian. Guitarist. Zymurgist. Librarian.
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6,482


Scion of the McKeesport Becks.


WWW
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2013, 10:57:12 AM »

Quote
I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair.

No, St Paul did not say long. The Greek word he used does not mean long, it means coiffed, primped, styled.

Wish more folks were aware of this distinction - after all, Christ Himself as an adult had long hair, as attested to consistently and unwaveringly in iconography.

Amen!  I can't tell you how many times I've had to correct "Gotcha Atheists" on this point.  Surprisingly, most are receptive to the correction and accept it's just a bad translation issue.
Logged

"Hearing a nun's confession is like being stoned to death with popcorn." --Abp. Fulton Sheen
Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 6,889



« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2013, 11:02:53 AM »

Quote
I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair.

No, St Paul did not say long. The Greek word he used does not mean long, it means coiffed, primped, styled.

Logged

vamrat
Vamratoraptor
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Serbian Orthodox
Jurisdiction: New Gracanica
Posts: 7,854



« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2013, 11:38:52 AM »

Quote
I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair.

No, St Paul did not say long. The Greek word he used does not mean long, it means coiffed, primped, styled.



Lord have mercy, but that hair is a work of ART!
Logged

Das ist des Jägers Ehrenschild, daß er beschützt und hegt sein Wild, weidmännisch jagt, wie sich’s gehört, den Schöpfer im Geschöpfe ehrt.
FatherGiryus
You are being watched.
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Patriarchate of Antioch - NA
Posts: 2,122



« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2013, 12:50:56 PM »

Christ is risen!

You have to remember the historical context of early monasticism: where does a 'Roman' get his hair cut?  In the Baths... the Roman Baths.

Most people did not have the money to afford scissors or razors at home, and so the average person got 'cleaned up' at the local Bath, which cut hair, shaved, and even plucked out armpit hair (that was another great Roman fad).

They were not 'moral' places, since the baths also were connected to prostitution and sexual conduct.  Early Christians avoided the baths altogether.

Monks lived so far from the cities that they had no access to the Baths.  If they were 'cleaned up' (i.e. shaved and trimmed) it meant they had left the monastery.  That's usually bad news in that time.

The canonical injunction against 'destroying the beard' has to do with the homosexual practice of pulling out the beard with wax, since homosexual conduct as a 'receiver' was illegal once the beard had grown in and one became a 'man.'  Some men had their bodies waxed to dodge the social custom so they could continue in the activity.

By walking around with long hair and a shaggy beard, the monk was advertising his avoidance of the Baths and all that they stood for.
Logged

http://orthodoxyandrecovery.blogspot.com
The most dangerous thing about riding a tiger is the dismount.  - Indian proverb
GabrieltheCelt
Hillbilly Extraordinaire
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6,990


Chasin' down a Hoodoo...


« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2013, 09:02:40 PM »

Quote
I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair.

No, St Paul did not say long. The Greek word he used does not mean long, it means coiffed, primped, styled.

Wish more folks were aware of this distinction - after all, Christ Himself as an adult had long hair, as attested to consistently and unwaveringly in iconography.

 This is really interesting.  I'm not doubting you, but what is your source(s)?  I've always wondered why our priests and monastics have long hair in light of this verse, but now, this makes perfect sense.  I wonder how many other of our understanding are off all because of misinterpretation?  How can we possibly know?  I've been Orthodox for almost 9 years and never heard this before.
Logged

"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying
Punch
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: Body of Christ
Posts: 5,590



« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2013, 09:31:40 PM »

I sure hope that wigs do not count!
Logged

I would be happy to agree with you, but then both of us would be wrong.
Schultz
Christian. Guitarist. Zymurgist. Librarian.
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6,482


Scion of the McKeesport Becks.


WWW
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2013, 10:44:39 PM »

Quote
I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair.

No, St Paul did not say long. The Greek word he used does not mean long, it means coiffed, primped, styled.

Wish more folks were aware of this distinction - after all, Christ Himself as an adult had long hair, as attested to consistently and unwaveringly in iconography.

 This is really interesting.  I'm not doubting you, but what is your source(s)?  I've always wondered why our priests and monastics have long hair in light of this verse, but now, this makes perfect sense.  I wonder how many other of our understanding are off all because of misinterpretation?  How can we possibly know?  I've been Orthodox for almost 9 years and never heard this before.

have you never wondered why Christ's hair in icons is ALWAYS long?
Logged

"Hearing a nun's confession is like being stoned to death with popcorn." --Abp. Fulton Sheen
GabrieltheCelt
Hillbilly Extraordinaire
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6,990


Chasin' down a Hoodoo...


« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2013, 10:54:48 PM »

Quote
I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair.

No, St Paul did not say long. The Greek word he used does not mean long, it means coiffed, primped, styled.

Wish more folks were aware of this distinction - after all, Christ Himself as an adult had long hair, as attested to consistently and unwaveringly in iconography.

 This is really interesting.  I'm not doubting you, but what is your source(s)?  I've always wondered why our priests and monastics have long hair in light of this verse, but now, this makes perfect sense.  I wonder how many other of our understanding are off all because of misinterpretation?  How can we possibly know?  I've been Orthodox for almost 9 years and never heard this before.

have you never wondered why Christ's hair in icons is ALWAYS long?

 Obviously there are many instances (icons, monastics, priests) where the actual practice differs from the Apostle's admonishment.  I always just figured the inconsistency was with my understanding.  Some of the explanations have cleared it up for me (for which I am grateful) and I simply wanted the source(s) so I could either bookmark it or print it out to place in my bible.
Logged

"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying
Deacon Lance
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Byzantine Catholic
Jurisdiction: Archeparchy of Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,962


Liturgy at Mt. St. Macrina Pilgrimage


« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2013, 12:00:10 AM »


Quinisext Council, Canon 42.

As touching so-called hermits, who dressed in black and with a growth of hair on their head go about the cities and associate with laymen and women, and insult their own profession, we decree, if they choose to tonsure their hair and adopt the habit (or garb) of other Monks, that they be installed in a Monastery and be enrolled with their brethren there. But if they do not prefer to do so, they must be driven out of the cities altogether and be forced to dwell in deserts, from which they formed the name they have applied to themselves.
 

Interpretation.

Because of the fact that of old many deceivers of the people calling themselves hermits, wearing black and growing hair on their head, roamed round cities, mixing with men and women, and discrediting their monastic profession, the present Canon decrees that if such men are willing to cut off their hair, like the rest of monks who live in monasteries,[170] and to be settled down in a monastery, well and good; but if they are unwilling, let them be driven out of the cities entirely, and let them go and dwell in the deserts, from which they falsely, and not truly and truthfully, came to call themselves “hermits.” (Note of Translator. — This word hermit in English has somehow or other acquired an initial h which does not belong to it. It is derived from the Greek word for desert eremia, whence the Greek word in question is eremites, meaning “(a monk) inhabiting the desert or wilderness.”)
 
Notes
 
[170] Note from the present Canon that monks living in monasteries and coenobitic communities must cut their hair symmetrically; for it appears that monks affect a symmetrical haircut both from this Canon and from the discourse of Athanasius the Great concerning virginity, and also from the first sermon on Peace by St. Gregory the Theologian, and from many historical narratives of Lausaicus. Since the present time is (considered to be) a time of mourning among monks, according to divine Chrysostom (Homily on the Gospel of St. Matthew No. 56) and John Climax. God, by the way, says through Isaiah that shaving the head is a sign of mourning and weeping and of beating the breast (Isa. 22:12). And if, as St. Paul says, any man in general is ugly when he has hair (and see the Footnote to c. XCVI of the present (C.), how much more ugly monks are who grow hair! But if all monks in general ought to cut their hair symmetrically, how much more ought young monks living in monasteries or cells, and deacons, to cut their hair! For such persons scandalize others with their beardless face as much as they do with their long combed hair. Against these incongruities those living in cities, and especially those living in the imperial capital city ought to be on their guard at all times.

http://jbburnett.com/resources/canons/56can/56can042.html
Logged

My cromulent posts embiggen this forum.
LBK
Warned
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 11,259


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us!


« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2013, 12:21:53 AM »

Quote
I find it rather bizarre since St. Paul said it's shameful for a man to have long hair.

No, St Paul did not say long. The Greek word he used does not mean long, it means coiffed, primped, styled.

Wish more folks were aware of this distinction - after all, Christ Himself as an adult had long hair, as attested to consistently and unwaveringly in iconography.

 This is really interesting.  I'm not doubting you, but what is your source(s)?  I've always wondered why our priests and monastics have long hair in light of this verse, but now, this makes perfect sense.  I wonder how many other of our understanding are off all because of misinterpretation?  How can we possibly know?  I've been Orthodox for almost 9 years and never heard this before.

Here is the verse from Corinthians in the original Greek:

14 ἢ οὐδὲ αὐτὴ ἡ φύσις διδάσκει ὑμᾶς ὅτι ἀνὴρ μὲν ἐὰν κομᾷ, ἀτιμία αὐτῷ ἐστι,

The bolded word koma is a cognate of a word which, even in modern Greek, means to cut and style hair. The words kommotis and kommotria are the masculine and feminine forms of hairdresser, i.e. one who styles and beautifies hair.

It ts therefore clear that plain, long hair is perfectly acceptable for men, according to St Paul, as, indeed it was for Christ.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 12:23:24 AM by LBK » Logged
Gunnarr
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Posts: 1,768



« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2013, 01:53:30 AM »

I do not really like the ponytails. I have always seem them as girlish but that is just the culture I grew up in

but if you want to know why they have ponytails, look at old pictures of those novices at mount athos who did not use them (oh and my, there were hundreds and hundreds of monks back then in even one monastery! quite depressing today)

Anyway, because I cannot remember where to view old athos pictures, I will tell you the hair goes pretty crazy if it is not put in a ponytail. I will just draw it in paint for fun!



the hair gets kind of messy, going in all directions!

at least that is why i think they wear ponytails, because those that did not in the pictures had hair like that... sort of...


I must apologize for this post
Logged

I am a demonic servant! Beware!
Gebre Menfes Kidus
"SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Ethiopian Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Tewahedo / Non-Chalcedonian
Posts: 8,361

"Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"


WWW
« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2013, 03:57:40 AM »

Why do monks style their hair into ponytails? Is it because they are not supposed to cut their hair so a monkeytail is easier to work with or is there some type of religious symbolism? Is it a sin to cut a monkeytail like it is with beards?

Is it a sin to cut a beard? If my husband does not trim his beard, it gets all tangled into dread locks.


That's great! I wish I could get my beard to lock up like that!  Smiley


Selam
Logged

"Beauty is truth, and Orthodoxy is beautiful." +GMK+
Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 6,889



« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2013, 04:40:27 PM »

I will tell you the hair goes pretty crazy if it is not put in a ponytail.

No it doesn't if one doesn't have curly hair. Have you ever even had long hair yourself?
Logged

William
Muted
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 4,354


« Reply #23 on: May 08, 2013, 09:17:01 PM »

I must apologize for this post

It's my favorite in the thread, actually.

I remember akimori makoto once said something about the monkeytails having to do with the Turkish occupation, I've never found more information on that though.
Logged

Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant
Shanghaiski
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 7,973


Holy Trinity Church of Gergeti, Georgia


« Reply #24 on: May 08, 2013, 09:51:54 PM »

I must apologize for this post

It's my favorite in the thread, actually.

I remember akimori makoto once said something about the monkeytails having to do with the Turkish occupation, I've never found more information on that though.

A lot of things that get tossed to the Turkish occupation do not account for practices in lands not occupied by Turks, which are the same.
Logged

Quote from: GabrieltheCelt
If you spend long enough on this forum, you'll come away with all sorts of weird, untrue ideas of Orthodox Christianity.
Quote from: orthonorm
I would suggest most persons in general avoid any question beginning with why.
orthonorm
Warned
Hoplitarches
*************
Offline Offline

Faith: Sola Gratia
Jurisdiction: Outside
Posts: 16,540



« Reply #25 on: May 08, 2013, 10:43:09 PM »

"if a man shaves his face to please other men, he is an abomination to God".  The key there is not the shaving, but "to please other men".

Like conforming the aesthetic standards of the men conducting an interview for a job? Much of what men do is to please other men, including growing their hair long to please their spiritual father, abbot, etc.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2013, 10:44:02 PM by orthonorm » Logged

Ignorance is not a lack, but a passion.
Punch
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: Body of Christ
Posts: 5,590



« Reply #26 on: May 09, 2013, 09:23:39 AM »

"if a man shaves his face to please other men, he is an abomination to God".  The key there is not the shaving, but "to please other men".

Like conforming the aesthetic standards of the men conducting an interview for a job? Much of what men do is to please other men, including growing their hair long to please their spiritual father, abbot, etc.

No.  I used to think that, but was told by a priest later that "to please other men" was a reference to those that shaved to look like young boys, and therefor still be able to be on the receiving end of Roman and Greek pleasures. 
Logged

I would be happy to agree with you, but then both of us would be wrong.
Seraphim98
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 566



« Reply #27 on: May 10, 2013, 11:35:23 PM »

Quote
Early Christians avoided the baths altogether.

I'm not sure this is altogether absolute.  According to Eusebius the Apostle John was at the baths at Ephesus when approached by the herisarch Cerintheus. The heretic asked John if he recognized him. "I do recognize you," the saint replied, "I recognize the offspring of Satan."
Logged
Shanghaiski
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 7,973


Holy Trinity Church of Gergeti, Georgia


« Reply #28 on: May 10, 2013, 11:44:35 PM »

Quote
Early Christians avoided the baths altogether.

I'm not sure this is altogether absolute.  According to Eusebius the Apostle John was at the baths at Ephesus when approached by the herisarch Cerintheus. The heretic asked John if he recognized him. "I do recognize you," the saint replied, "I recognize the offspring of Satan."

I was thinking just that.

However, that is one instance, and then there is an alleged general trend.
Logged

Quote from: GabrieltheCelt
If you spend long enough on this forum, you'll come away with all sorts of weird, untrue ideas of Orthodox Christianity.
Quote from: orthonorm
I would suggest most persons in general avoid any question beginning with why.
Shanghaiski
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 7,973


Holy Trinity Church of Gergeti, Georgia


« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2013, 11:46:06 PM »

Monks I've seen put their hair under their hats.
Logged

Quote from: GabrieltheCelt
If you spend long enough on this forum, you'll come away with all sorts of weird, untrue ideas of Orthodox Christianity.
Quote from: orthonorm
I would suggest most persons in general avoid any question beginning with why.
William
Muted
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 4,354


« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2013, 12:53:21 AM »

Quote
Early Christians avoided the baths altogether.

I'm not sure this is altogether absolute.  According to Eusebius the Apostle John was at the baths at Ephesus when approached by the herisarch Cerintheus. The heretic asked John if he recognized him. "I do recognize you," the saint replied, "I recognize the offspring of Satan."

Maybe he was there to preach.
Logged

Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant
William
Muted
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 4,354


« Reply #31 on: May 13, 2013, 08:37:52 PM »

Are there official rules for monks about hair?
Logged

Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant
peacenprayer
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOMT
Posts: 98


ting ting ting


« Reply #32 on: May 13, 2013, 08:47:54 PM »

I'd say they tie it into a ponytail because they have things to do. Long hair gets in the way. Or everything. Forever. Unless you tie it back. It's entirely practical, me thinks.
Also, I recall reading that growing it is something to do with having the likeness of Christ, and also to dispel vanity.
Logged

Chanter, Blacksmith, Tailor, Captain of the Guard. ...I made the last one up.
Shanghaiski
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 7,973


Holy Trinity Church of Gergeti, Georgia


« Reply #33 on: May 13, 2013, 09:09:46 PM »

Are there official rules for monks about hair?

AFAIK, just tradition, the monastery typikon, and the will of the elder.
Logged

Quote from: GabrieltheCelt
If you spend long enough on this forum, you'll come away with all sorts of weird, untrue ideas of Orthodox Christianity.
Quote from: orthonorm
I would suggest most persons in general avoid any question beginning with why.
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.127 seconds with 62 queries.