Author Topic: Excommunication in Greek  (Read 1156 times)

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Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Excommunication in Greek
« on: April 16, 2012, 10:21:35 PM »
Christ is Risen!

As I understand it, "Excommunication" comes from Latin ("Ex"-, prefixed to names implying office, station, condition, denotes that the person formerly held the office, or is out of the office or condition now. And "Communio"-, act of sharing, belonging, mutual participation.) and denotes that the one who is 'excommunicated' is one who is no longer able to share in or belong to (for a specified time) the community. 

What I would like to know is what is the Greek equivalent?  In English, we use the same phrasing, but what about in Greek?  And does it carry the same meaning?  Incidentally, the Webster dictionary cites the first known use of the word 'Communion' was the 14th century.  When was the Greek equivalency first recorded, and, has it's connotation changed? 

I hope I was able to articulate my questions clear enough...
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Offline Ionnis

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2012, 10:50:46 PM »
In the New Testament the word used is 'ἀνάθεμα'.  
« Last Edit: April 16, 2012, 10:50:59 PM by Ionnis »
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Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2012, 01:39:24 AM »
In the New Testament the word used is 'ἀνάθεμα'.  
Is 'Anathema' a total banishment?  What about the lesser 'Epitemia'?
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Offline Quinault

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2012, 02:47:11 AM »
From my understanding excommunication used to merely mean being separated from the Eucharist for a time. It wasn't meant to be a shunning, but a time of repentance and healing before partaking of the gifts again. There was prescribed times of excommunication for sins and a formula of how it would be done. The most severe form would be a person not allowed inside the parish. This person wasn't to be shunned by all congregants. They would stand outside and ask for the prayers of those entering. After a time outside the parish they could go into the narthex, then they could go in the Nave and kneel, then stand....etc until they could receive the Eucharist again.

Our parish priest went over this and actually had the information of the length of time and procedure of excommunication for each sin. Interestingly they all listed YEARS of excommunication, not weeks or months. But he made a point to explain that it was not meant as punishment or shunning. This time away from receiving was for healing and the congregants were to be loving to that person.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2012, 02:48:45 AM by Quinault »

Offline Quinault

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2012, 02:50:28 AM »
The protestant church we used to attend has been getting international attention for shunning members and calling it excommunication since Jan of this year.

Offline Shanghaiski

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2012, 04:01:55 PM »
The protestant church we used to attend has been getting international attention for shunning members and calling it excommunication since Jan of this year.

Nothing makes one want to return to church so much as a good shunning.
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Offline primuspilus

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2012, 05:13:15 PM »
The protestant church we used to attend has been getting international attention for shunning members and calling it excommunication since Jan of this year.
Bah no worries, the ex-members can just grab another plate at the buffet....no worries :)

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Offline SolEX01

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2012, 11:59:06 PM »
Christ is Risen!

As I understand it, "Excommunication" comes from Latin ("Ex"-, prefixed to names implying office, station, condition, denotes that the person formerly held the office, or is out of the office or condition now. And "Communio"-, act of sharing, belonging, mutual participation.) and denotes that the one who is 'excommunicated' is one who is no longer able to share in or belong to (for a specified time) the community. 

What I would like to know is what is the Greek equivalent?  In English, we use the same phrasing, but what about in Greek?  And does it carry the same meaning?  Incidentally, the Webster dictionary cites the first known use of the word 'Communion' was the 14th century.  When was the Greek equivalency first recorded, and, has it's connotation changed? 

I hope I was able to articulate my questions clear enough...

Greek Equivalent = αφορισμός A-For-Is-MOS - to mark off, to separate

source

Offline laconicstudent

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2012, 01:31:47 AM »
The protestant church we used to attend has been getting international attention for shunning members and calling it excommunication since Jan of this year.

Oh yay, Mars Hill. Amirite? I know what you mean.

Offline Quinault

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2012, 01:55:51 AM »
Yes, we attended MH for about a decade before leaving in 2007 right before all that crazy Petry/Meyer stuff. I mean right before as in a few days before.

Offline laconicstudent

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2012, 02:08:40 AM »
Yes, we attended MH for about a decade before leaving in 2007 right before all that crazy Petry/Meyer stuff. I mean right before as in a few days before.

Oh dear. I attended up until Mark had Grace tell us that if a man was tempted to get into an affair with an office worker because he had "needs", it was obviously the wife's fault and she was in "serious sin" because she wasn't "serving" her husband enough. Cue lengthy rant about a wife's place and the man being the breadwinner and king of the household and more about how she wasn't being loving to her husband blah blah blah blah blah.

I was just around for a couple months, but I managed to be there for his really weird Song of Solomon series. Or one of them anyways.  :-\

But yeah, reading about the Petry/Meyer stuff, it didn't seem at all that hard to believe. Which is disturbing.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2012, 02:09:52 AM by laconicstudent »

Offline pensateomnia

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2012, 07:57:33 PM »
What I would like to know is what is the Greek equivalent? 

αφοριζέσθω is how it appears in the canons: let him be excommunicated/cut off/separated. Like most verbs, it can be found very early in Attic Greek. Thucydides used it to mean "banished from the people." Nowadays, some seem to think of it as a very technical separation from the chalice, but, originally, it meant to give the boot -- kick out, shun, have nothing to do with, etc.

To answer what I think is your other question: There is no linguistic relationship between the Greek word for "excommunicate" and the Greek word for "communion," as there happens to be in Latin and English.

Incidentally, the Webster dictionary cites the first known use of the word 'Communion' was the 14th century.  When was the Greek equivalency first recorded, and, has it's connotation changed? 

The Greek word for communion is κοινωνία. It means communion, association, or partnership, and predates Christianity. Plato, Aristotle, and even the poets used it. I don't know the earliest date it is recorded, but at least in the 5th century BC. It too has taken on a specific meaning within Christianity, but one can speak of "communion" in ways other than "holy communion" itself.
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Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: Excommunication in Greek
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2012, 08:59:21 PM »
What I would like to know is what is the Greek equivalent? 

αφοριζέσθω is how it appears in the canons: let him be excommunicated/cut off/separated. Like most verbs, it can be found very early in Attic Greek. Thucydides used it to mean "banished from the people." Nowadays, some seem to think of it as a very technical separation from the chalice, but, originally, it meant to give the boot -- kick out, shun, have nothing to do with, etc.

To answer what I think is your other question: There is no linguistic relationship between the Greek word for "excommunicate" and the Greek word for "communion," as there happens to be in Latin and English.

Incidentally, the Webster dictionary cites the first known use of the word 'Communion' was the 14th century.  When was the Greek equivalency first recorded, and, has it's connotation changed? 

The Greek word for communion is κοινωνία. It means communion, association, or partnership, and predates Christianity. Plato, Aristotle, and even the poets used it. I don't know the earliest date it is recorded, but at least in the 5th century BC. It too has taken on a specific meaning within Christianity, but one can speak of "communion" in ways other than "holy communion" itself.

 Thanks a million!  :)
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