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Author Topic: the "true" origin of easter according to a pagan  (Read 949 times) Average Rating: 0
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Jason.Wike
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« on: April 16, 2012, 06:27:59 PM »

http://youtu.be/bGq3TXG0Ydk

This is just ridiculous... This guy makes up a story and proclaims this is the origin of Easter, Easter Eggs and "Easter bunnies." Its why "Ostaras" favorite offering is easter eggs and all kinds of stuff...

Sadly, some people will believe this is some true ancient tale. This is make it up as you go religion at its finest(worst).
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yeshuaisiam
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2012, 07:34:43 PM »

http://youtu.be/bGq3TXG0Ydk

This is just ridiculous... This guy makes up a story and proclaims this is the origin of Easter, Easter Eggs and "Easter bunnies." Its why "Ostaras" favorite offering is easter eggs and all kinds of stuff...

Sadly, some people will believe this is some true ancient tale. This is make it up as you go religion at its finest(worst).

Did Ostera predate the passover - aka - pascha?

That question always messes them up.
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« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2012, 05:25:24 AM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.
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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2012, 09:11:15 AM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  It did not end well and I spent the entirety of the week seething.  We did come to terms later in the week and, honestly, the whole thing was a good lesson for me not to get angry at people for being ignorant.

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« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2012, 12:28:56 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  It did not end well and I spent the entirety of the week seething.  We did come to terms later in the week and, honestly, the whole thing was a good lesson for me not to get angry at people for being ignorant.


Yeah, there are a lot of people getting this Easter Ostra "rumor" off of many internet sources.  I don't know if its some kind of conspiracy of pagans, atheists, or other Christian fundamentalists... I just know its getting pretty "popular".   I like you had some close to me try to argue their "facts" and it really bent me out of shape for a while.   After extensive research, just a simple "Did it pre-date Pascha aka the passover?" basically stumps the entire argument.   
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« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2012, 12:31:44 PM »

Ostaras? What happened to Ishtar?
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« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2012, 04:29:30 PM »

It's all made up around one sentence from Bede!
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« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2012, 04:35:45 PM »

Ostaras? What happened to Ishtar?

This is my favorite one.  If Eostre/Ostaras = Ishtar, it is the only time a Sumerian word made its way to Germanic w/o coming through Latin or Greek.
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« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2012, 04:38:10 PM »

Ostaras? What happened to Ishtar?

This is my favorite one.  If Eostre/Ostaras = Ishtar, it is the only time a Sumerian word made its way to Germanic w/o coming through Latin or Greek.
Ishtar is Old Babylonian.  Wink
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« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2012, 04:57:56 PM »

Ostaras? What happened to Ishtar?

This is my favorite one.  If Eostre/Ostaras = Ishtar, it is the only time a Sumerian word made its way to Germanic w/o coming through Latin or Greek.
Ishtar is Old Babylonian.  Wink

Ah, so it is! 

Still the same stretch Tongue
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« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2012, 05:47:57 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  It did not end well and I spent the entirety of the week seething.  We did come to terms later in the week and, honestly, the whole thing was a good lesson for me not to get angry at people for being ignorant.



I think it is ok to feel sorry for folks who revel in their ignorance.
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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2012, 05:59:16 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  



Not trying to be difficult, but this is not quite correct.  As far as I know, in Japanese for instance it is "I-suta"  and according to the link below in Hindi it is "īsṭar". There are a few others.

http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/easter.htm

That aside, the eostre/Easter thing makes for the pinching of the bridge of the nose and the thudding of the forehead on the keyboard.


Ebor
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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2012, 06:05:44 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  



Not trying to be difficult, but this is not quite correct.  As far as I know, in Japanese for instance it is "I-suta"  and according to the link below in Hindi it is "īsṭar". There are a few others.

http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/easter.htm

That aside, the eostre/Easter thing makes for the pinching of the bridge of the nose and the thudding of the forehead on the keyboard.


Ebor


Well, the Japanese one almost certainly is an English introduction (they never accept words without changing them to fit Japanese sound patterns, ex. Christian is Kirishitan). I'm betting the Hindi word is too.
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« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2012, 06:25:03 PM »

There was an EO Christian that made an excellent video on Christmas... It was just a guy talking, but it covers the same exact "junk" rumors that people circulate about the pagan origin.

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« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2012, 06:35:51 PM »

It's all made up around one sentence from Bede!

Think this is crazy though, a lot of neo-pagans worship Taliesen as a "god." Taliesen was a real person, that was a Christian...

This is one of his hymns:

The Eternal Trinity

The eternal Trinity
Made the element,
After the element,
Adam wonderfully.
And after Adam,
Well he made Eva.
The blessed Israel
The mighty Spirit made.
Ardent the suggestion,
Clear the reasoning.
Twelve towns of Israel, rising equally high,
Twelve sons of Israel the generous God made
Twelve sons of Israel were nursed together.
Twelve good, blameless, three mothers nursed them.
One person created them, the Creator made them.
As he will do as he pleases, who is supreme.
Twelve sons of Israel made the Lord.
As he will do as he pleases, who is skilful. [sic]
Twelve sons of Israel bore reward
Of the mission of Jesus.
And one father there was to them
And three mothers to them.
From them came grace
And good offspring.
And Mary, good, created,
And Christ, my strengthener,
Lord of every fair country.
And I will call on and sing to thee every day;
For has been my desire
Friendship with thee.
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« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2012, 08:32:12 PM »

It's all made up around one sentence from Bede!

Think this is crazy though, a lot of neo-pagans worship Taliesen as a "god." Taliesen was a real person, that was a Christian...

Not that crazy really...
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« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2012, 08:49:41 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  It did not end well and I spent the entirety of the week seething.  We did come to terms later in the week and, honestly, the whole thing was a good lesson for me not to get angry at people for being ignorant.





I think it is ok to feel sorry for folks who revel in their ignorance.

Feeling sorry for them, yes.

Getting angry about it and seething all week (esp. when it's Holy Week!), no.
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« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2012, 08:50:55 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  



Not trying to be difficult, but this is not quite correct.  As far as I know, in Japanese for instance it is "I-suta"  and according to the link below in Hindi it is "īsṭar". There are a few others.

http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/easter.htm

That aside, the eostre/Easter thing makes for the pinching of the bridge of the nose and the thudding of the forehead on the keyboard.


Ebor


Well, the Japanese one almost certainly is an English introduction (they never accept words without changing them to fit Japanese sound patterns, ex. Christian is Kirishitan). I'm betting the Hindi word is too.

Yes, the name of the feast came to these places via English. This wasn't a strange coincidence or anything like that.  My point was that there are non-Germanic languages that do not have the word based on any form of "Pasch.."  I was offering a slight correction to a previous post. One thing to consider is how things get to a different culture and then if they become part of it.

I am familiar with the Japanese way of adapting words from other languages. "Kurisumasu" is Christmas for example and "aisu kuriimu" is ice cream.  The word for bread "pan" is from the Portuguese originally.
But I digress.   Cheesy

Ebor
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« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2012, 08:52:08 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  



Not trying to be difficult, but this is not quite correct.  As far as I know, in Japanese for instance it is "I-suta"  and according to the link below in Hindi it is "īsṭar". There are a few others.

http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/easter.htm

That aside, the eostre/Easter thing makes for the pinching of the bridge of the nose and the thudding of the forehead on the keyboard.


Ebor


What Jason.Wike said, and I should have said, "non-Germanic European language".  Interestingly, languages such as Swedish and Norwegian, heavily influenced by Anglo-Saxon/Old German, use a form of Pascha.

I do wonder the etymology of the sub-continental languages phrases for "Happy Easter!"
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« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2012, 08:55:18 PM »

What Jason.Wike said, and I should have said, "non-Germanic European language".  Interestingly, languages such as Swedish and Norwegian, heavily influenced by Anglo-Saxon/Old German, use a form of Pascha.

I do wonder the etymology of the sub-continental languages phrases for "Happy Easter!"

One word can make a difference.  Wink 

Languages and how they change/grow can be fascinating, I think.

Ebor
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« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2012, 09:10:46 PM »

I do wonder the etymology of the sub-continental languages phrases for "Happy Easter!"
I think most of it is just borrowed from English and used in a secular manner. In Malayalam for the liturgy and canonical hours we usually refer to Pascha as either uyirrpu or kyamtha/kyomtho which both mean resurrection.
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« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2012, 10:45:54 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  It did not end well and I spent the entirety of the week seething.  We did come to terms later in the week and, honestly, the whole thing was a good lesson for me not to get angry at people for being ignorant.


I've recently learned something like that. Though what can convince a person who doesn't want to know the facts? Nothing I suspect.
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« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2012, 11:44:11 PM »

Why a bunch of Pagans would connect their day in specific relation to the Jewish passover is a question these people often forget to ask themselves.

One of my closest friends pulled out this entire canard a couple weeks and simply would barely acknowledge that all non-Germanic languages refer to the Feast of the Resurrection in some form of "Pascha."  It did not end well and I spent the entirety of the week seething.  We did come to terms later in the week and, honestly, the whole thing was a good lesson for me not to get angry at people for being ignorant.



These are words of wisdom.  It is not good to angry at people for being ignorant.  Hopefully people will take your word for it rather than having to go through the process themselves only to come to the same conclusion, but...you know...we are a proud modern people.  Lord have mercy. 
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