OrthodoxChristianity.net
November 23, 2014, 03:38:38 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Prayers to the Eucharistic Christ  (Read 594 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
akimel
Fr Aidan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR (Western Rite)
Posts: 520



WWW
« on: March 12, 2012, 11:24:08 AM »

In the 5th century Philoxenus of Mabbug commended the following prayer to be said by the priest at his communion, with this instruction, "When you have extended your hands and taken the body, bow, and put your hands before your face, and worship the living Body whom you hold. Then speak with him in a low voice, and with your gaze resting upon him say to him":

Quote
I carry you, living God, who is incarnate in the bread, and I embrace you in my palms, Lord of the worlds whom no world has contained. You have circumscribed yourself in a fiery coal within a fleshly palm—you Lord, who with your palm measured out the dust of the earth. You are holy, God incarnate in my hands in a fiery coal which is a body. See, I hold you, although there is nothing that contains you; a bodily hand embraces you, Lord of natures whom a fleshly womb embraced. Within a womb you became a circumscribed body, and now within a hand you appear to me as a small morsel.

As you have made me worthy to approach you and receive you—and see, my hands embrace you confidently—make me worthy, Lord, to eat you in a holy manner and to taste the food of your body as a taste of your life. Instead of the stomach, the body’s member, may the womb of my intellect and the hand of my mind receive you. May you be conceived in me as you were in the womb of the Virgin. There you appeared as an infant, and your hidden self was revealed to the world as corporeal fruit; may you also appear in me here and be revealed from me in fruits that are spiritual works and just labors pleasing to your will.

And by your food may my desires be killed; and by the drinking of your cup may my passions be quenched. And instead of the members of my body, may my thoughts receive strength from the nourishment of your body. Like the manifest members of my body, may my hidden thoughts be engaged in exercise and in running and in works according to your living commands and your spiritual laws. From the food of your body and the drinking of your blood may I wax strong inwardly, and excel outwardly, and run diligently, and to attain to the full stature of an interior human being. May I become a perfect man, mature in the intelligence residing in all my spiritual members, my head being crowned with the crown of perfection of all of my behavior. May I be a royal diadem in your hands, as you promised me, O hidden God whose manifestness I embrace in the perfection of your body.

My question is this:  Is this prayer exceptional and unique in the Oriental Orthodox tradition?  Is it presently said by OO priests, or did it disappear from the tradition?  Are there any other prayers that are comparable, by which I mean, which are specifically directed to Christ Jesus present in the Holy Gifts?  Thank you.
Logged

Ortho_cat
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: AOCA-DWMA
Posts: 5,392



« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2012, 12:02:49 PM »

awesome prayer. Do the OO receive the eucharist in their hands?  Huh
Logged
minasoliman
Mr., Sir, Dude, Guy, Male, tr. Minas in Greek, Menes in white people Egyptologists :-P
Section Moderator
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic Orthodox Archdiocese of North America
Posts: 12,674


Strengthen O Lord the work of Your hands(Is 19:25)


« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2012, 10:12:15 PM »

awesome prayer. Do the OO receive the eucharist in their hands?  Huh

No...not in any OO Church I've been to.  St. Philoxenus is a bishop, so he can carry the body of Christ in his hands.  It's a good prayer for priests, but also something that can be said by the laity.  Rather than carrying the bread and wine in our palms, we may carry it in the palms of our hearts and our minds, so to speak, and embrace Him who embraced our nature.

Since St. Philoxenus is of the Syriac tradition, perhaps the Syriac Church does, but this prayer is not in the Coptic rites.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2012, 10:17:02 PM by minasoliman » Logged

Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.
Ortho_cat
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: AOCA-DWMA
Posts: 5,392



« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2012, 01:25:01 AM »

awesome prayer. Do the OO receive the eucharist in their hands?  Huh

No...not in any OO Church I've been to.  St. Philoxenus is a bishop, so he can carry the body of Christ in his hands.  It's a good prayer for priests, but also something that can be said by the laity.  Rather than carrying the bread and wine in our palms, we may carry it in the palms of our hearts and our minds, so to speak, and embrace Him who embraced our nature.

Since St. Philoxenus is of the Syriac tradition, perhaps the Syriac Church does, but this prayer is not in the Coptic rites.

ok Smiley

do you use leavened or unleavened?

also, do the communicants partake of the elements seperately, or is the bread co-mingled with the wine in some form?
« Last Edit: March 14, 2012, 01:25:55 AM by Ortho_cat » Logged
Jonathan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 810


WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2012, 07:58:46 AM »

awesome prayer. Do the OO receive the eucharist in their hands?  Huh

No...not in any OO Church I've been to.  St. Philoxenus is a bishop, so he can carry the body of Christ in his hands.  It's a good prayer for priests, but also something that can be said by the laity.  Rather than carrying the bread and wine in our palms, we may carry it in the palms of our hearts and our minds, so to speak, and embrace Him who embraced our nature.

Since St. Philoxenus is of the Syriac tradition, perhaps the Syriac Church does, but this prayer is not in the Coptic rites.

ok Smiley

do you use leavened or unleavened?

also, do the communicants partake of the elements seperately, or is the bread co-mingled with the wine in some form?

Leavened. In the Coptic Church at least, reception was in the hand originally. I think this changed around the 4th century, but I could be wrong. The cloths people hold to their mouths are a remnant of this practice. If there is one priest, first the clergy, then men, then women receive the Body, then in the same order the Blood. If there are multiple priests (or a deacon), one give the Body, and another the Blood right afterwards. It is not presently the norm to use intinction (placing the Body in the Blood and giving both) except in the case of Communing the sick, but it can be used in some circumstances. However, before Communing the people, the priest places the Body in the Blood and receives It (the placing of the two together symbolizes resurrection). Infants under the age of 2 receive only from the chalice.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2012, 08:01:27 AM by Jonathan » Logged
sheenj
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Indian/Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church
Posts: 1,402


St. Gregorios of Parumala, pray for us...


« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2012, 09:35:51 AM »

awesome prayer. Do the OO receive the eucharist in their hands?  Huh

No...not in any OO Church I've been to.  St. Philoxenus is a bishop, so he can carry the body of Christ in his hands.  It's a good prayer for priests, but also something that can be said by the laity.  Rather than carrying the bread and wine in our palms, we may carry it in the palms of our hearts and our minds, so to speak, and embrace Him who embraced our nature.

Since St. Philoxenus is of the Syriac tradition, perhaps the Syriac Church does, but this prayer is not in the Coptic rites.

ok Smiley

do you use leavened or unleavened?

also, do the communicants partake of the elements seperately, or is the bread co-mingled with the wine in some form?
The Syriac and Indian Traditions use leavened bread which is then co-mingled with the wine during the Liturgy. The priest then distributes it to the laity either with his fingers if he distributes from the Paten or with a spoon if from the Chalice.
Logged
dhinuus
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 495



« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2012, 12:27:59 PM »

In the Syriac tradition, leavened bread is used. Actually the only OO jurisdiction that uses un-leavened bread is the Armenian Church.
In the Syriac Orthodox Church, we have various Anaphoras, some of them being:
- of St. James
- of St. John Chrysostom
- of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug
- of St. Jacob of Serrugh

The most commonly used Anaphora is the shorter version of St. James as shortened by Mor Gregorious Bar 'Ebroyo, Maphriana of the East with in the Syriac Orthodox Church (refered to in the west as Gregory Bar Hebraeus).  My understanding is that the prayer that you have quoted above is part of the silent prayer by the priest in the Anaphora of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug. The Anaphora that I have access to only includes the section said aloud, and does not include silent prayers by the priest. So I cannot confirm. 
Logged

NULL
Ortho_cat
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: AOCA-DWMA
Posts: 5,392



« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2012, 02:23:10 PM »

In the Syriac tradition, leavened bread is used. Actually the only OO jurisdiction that uses un-leavened bread is the Armenian Church.
In the Syriac Orthodox Church, we have various Anaphoras, some of them being:
- of St. James
- of St. John Chrysostom
- of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug
- of St. Jacob of Serrugh

The most commonly used Anaphora is the shorter version of St. James as shortened by Mor Gregorious Bar 'Ebroyo, Maphriana of the East with in the Syriac Orthodox Church (refered to in the west as Gregory Bar Hebraeus).  My understanding is that the prayer that you have quoted above is part of the silent prayer by the priest in the Anaphora of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug. The Anaphora that I have access to only includes the section said aloud, and does not include silent prayers by the priest. So I cannot confirm. 

was there ever any controversy regarding the Armenians using unleavened bread?
Logged
minasoliman
Mr., Sir, Dude, Guy, Male, tr. Minas in Greek, Menes in white people Egyptologists :-P
Section Moderator
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic Orthodox Archdiocese of North America
Posts: 12,674


Strengthen O Lord the work of Your hands(Is 19:25)


« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2012, 06:25:47 PM »

In the Syriac tradition, leavened bread is used. Actually the only OO jurisdiction that uses un-leavened bread is the Armenian Church.
In the Syriac Orthodox Church, we have various Anaphoras, some of them being:
- of St. James
- of St. John Chrysostom
- of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug
- of St. Jacob of Serrugh

The most commonly used Anaphora is the shorter version of St. James as shortened by Mor Gregorious Bar 'Ebroyo, Maphriana of the East with in the Syriac Orthodox Church (refered to in the west as Gregory Bar Hebraeus).  My understanding is that the prayer that you have quoted above is part of the silent prayer by the priest in the Anaphora of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug. The Anaphora that I have access to only includes the section said aloud, and does not include silent prayers by the priest. So I cannot confirm. 

was there ever any controversy regarding the Armenians using unleavened bread?

I remember personally, when there were days when the Coptic Church was the "only true Church," the Sunday School classes would consider unleavened bread a substantial difference between us and Catholics.  Now that more people know that the Armenian Church is a sister church and also uses unleavened bread, one has to wonder if this is really a "substantial" difference that matters, especially since intercommunion is openly practices among the OOs, and this is something that more and more people are starting to refrain from teaching as "wrong."  Now, one simply teaches why the Coptic Church uses leavened, not why it's wrong to use unleavened.
Logged

Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.
Ortho_cat
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: AOCA-DWMA
Posts: 5,392



« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2012, 12:08:57 AM »

In the Syriac tradition, leavened bread is used. Actually the only OO jurisdiction that uses un-leavened bread is the Armenian Church.
In the Syriac Orthodox Church, we have various Anaphoras, some of them being:
- of St. James
- of St. John Chrysostom
- of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug
- of St. Jacob of Serrugh

The most commonly used Anaphora is the shorter version of St. James as shortened by Mor Gregorious Bar 'Ebroyo, Maphriana of the East with in the Syriac Orthodox Church (refered to in the west as Gregory Bar Hebraeus).  My understanding is that the prayer that you have quoted above is part of the silent prayer by the priest in the Anaphora of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug. The Anaphora that I have access to only includes the section said aloud, and does not include silent prayers by the priest. So I cannot confirm. 

was there ever any controversy regarding the Armenians using unleavened bread?

I remember personally, when there were days when the Coptic Church was the "only true Church," the Sunday School classes would consider unleavened bread a substantial difference between us and Catholics.  Now that more people know that the Armenian Church is a sister church and also uses unleavened bread, one has to wonder if this is really a "substantial" difference that matters, especially since intercommunion is openly practices among the OOs, and this is something that more and more people are starting to refrain from teaching as "wrong."  Now, one simply teaches why the Coptic Church uses leavened, not why it's wrong to use unleavened.

And I doubt it would be a real issue hindering the re-unification between OO and EO also Smiley
Logged
Tags: communion 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.072 seconds with 37 queries.