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Author Topic: How To Properly Dispose Of Sacred Texts  (Read 2393 times) Average Rating: 0
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Jetavan
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« on: February 24, 2012, 02:17:05 PM »

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The Quran is considered to be the speech of God to humankind — word for word — explains Imam Johari Abdul-Malik.

"The traditional way of disposing of used or damaged copies of the text of the Quran is by burning it," he says.

But Malik, the director of outreach for the Dar al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Falls Church, Va., says that doesn't include burning it with the trash.
....
Many of the religious leaders who spoke to NPR agreed that burial was the most respectful way to dispose of their sacred text. In the Greek Orthodox Church, Bishop Andonios says, either a layperson or clergyman could put the Holy Scripture to rest.

"The appropriate way — if it was necessary to dispose of that item that had been torn or water-aged — would be to bury it or burn it," he says.

The bishop, who is chancellor of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, says no specific ceremony is involved.

"In the case of most laypeople, they would bring it to the church and let the parish priest dispose of it," he says.
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« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2012, 02:30:38 PM »

Quote
The Quran is considered to be the speech of God to humankind — word for word — explains Imam Johari Abdul-Malik.

"The traditional way of disposing of used or damaged copies of the text of the Quran is by burning it," he says.

But Malik, the director of outreach for the Dar al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Falls Church, Va., says that doesn't include burning it with the trash.
....
Many of the religious leaders who spoke to NPR agreed that burial was the most respectful way to dispose of their sacred text. In the Greek Orthodox Church, Bishop Andonios says, either a layperson or clergyman could put the Holy Scripture to rest.

"The appropriate way — if it was necessary to dispose of that item that had been torn or water-aged — would be to bury it or burn it," he says.

The bishop, who is chancellor of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, says no specific ceremony is involved.

"In the case of most laypeople, they would bring it to the church and let the parish priest dispose of it," he says.

I don't understand why such items are "charmed" or have some kind of mojo affiliated with them.  Chunk it and recycle it if you have another copy.  It's a book, the message is what is important.   The physical paper & binding and ink is just that, paper, binding and ink.  The message can be had in exact duplicate.

That said, there may be an issue with historical bibles because they may have genealogy or other historical significance to them.   But to think you are somehow dishonoring God because you recycled a water damaged or defunct/ruined Bible, I think that is really weird.   Just my opinion.
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« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2012, 02:37:04 PM »

That's interesting. I actually don't know what I'm supposed to do with a Bible that is very used and no longer readable.

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« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2012, 02:54:21 PM »

That's interesting. I actually don't know what I'm supposed to do with a Bible that is very used and no longer readable.

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Mostly in Orthodoxy, the practice I've seen was burying it.   
But, as my first post said...  I mean, why not recycle it into another bible?   
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« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2012, 02:59:46 PM »

What? Cremation? Is outrage!!!
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« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2012, 03:02:25 PM »

I don't understand why such items are "charmed" or have some kind of mojo affiliated with them.  Chunk it and recycle it if you have another copy.  It's a book, the message is what is important.   The physical paper & binding and ink is just that, paper, binding and ink.  The message can be had in exact duplicate.
Because we aren't gnostics.
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