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Author Topic: Hymns from the Western Tradition  (Read 3333 times) Average Rating: 0
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Punch
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« on: February 18, 2012, 08:45:56 PM »

As mentioned in another thread, I thought that it may be good to start a thread listing some of the favorite hymns of the Western Tradition.  I hope that I have put this in the correct place.  Below is one of my favorites:

"Jesus, I Will Ponder Now"
by Sigismund v. Birken
Translated by August Crull, 1845-1923

1. Jesus, I will ponder now
On Thy holy Passion;
With Thy Spirit me endow
For such meditation.
Grant that I in love and faith
May the image cherish
Of Thy suffering, pain, and death,
That I may not perish.

2. Make me see Thy great distress,
Anguish, and affliction,
Bonds and stripes and wretchedness
And Thy crucifixion;
Make me see how scourge and rod,
Spear and nails, did wound Thee,
How for man Thou diedst, O God,
Who with thorns had crowned Thee.

3. Yet, O Lord, not thus alone
Make me see Thy Passion,
But its cause to me make known
And its termination.
Ah! I also and my sin
Wrought Thy deep affliction;
This indeed the cause hath been
Of Thy crucifixion.

4. Grant that I Thy Passion view
With repentant grieving
Nor Thee crucify anew
By unholy living.
How could I refuse to shun
Every sinful pleasure
Since for me God's only Son
Suffered without measure?

5. If my sins give me alarm
And my conscience grieve me,
Let Thy cross my fear disarm,
Peace of conscience give me.
Grant that I may trust in Thee
And Thy holy Passion.
If His Son so loveth me,
God must have compassion.

6. Grant that I may willingly
Bear with Thee my crosses,
Learning humbleness of Thee,
Peace mid pain and losses.
May I give Thee love for love!
Hear me, O my Savior,
That I may in heaven above
Sing Thy praise forever.

The Lutheran Hymnal
Hymn #140
Text: Luke 18: 31-34
Author: Sigismund v. Birken, 1653
Translated by: August Crull, 1923, alt.
Titled: "Jesu, deine Passion"
Composer: Melchior Vulpius, 1609
Tune: "Jesu Kreuz, Leiden und Pein"
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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2012, 08:48:33 PM »

Another, more cheerful tune:

"Jesus Lives! The Victory's Won"
by Christian F. Gellert, 1715-1769
Translated by Frances E. Cox, 1812-1897

1. Jesus lives! The victory's won!
Death no longer can appal me;
Jesus lives! Death's reign is done!
From the grave Christ will recall me.
Brighter scenes will then commence;
This shall be my confidence.

2. Jesus lives! To Him the throne
High o'er heaven and earth is given.
I shall go where He is gone,
Live and reign with Him in heaven.
God is faithful. Doubtings, hence!
This shall be my confidence.

3. Jesus lives! For me He died,
Hence will I, to Jesus living,
Pure in heart and act abide,
Praise to Him and glory giving.
Freely God doth aid dispense;
This shall be my confidence.

4. Jesus lives! I know full well
Naught from me His love shall sever;
Life nor death nor powers of hell
Part me now from Christ forever.
God will be a sure Defense;
This shall be my confidence.

5. Jesus lives! and now is death
But the gate of life immortal;
This shall calm my trembling breath
When I pass its gloomy portal.
Faith shall cry, as fails each sense,
Jesus is my confidence!

The Lutheran Hymnal
Hymn #201
Text: Rom. 8:11
Author: Christian F. Gellert, 1757, ab.
Translated by: Frances E. Cox, 1841, alt.
Titled: "Jesus lebt, mit ihm auch ich"
Composer: Johann Crueger, 1656
Tune: "Jesus, meine Zuversicht"
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« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2012, 08:52:27 PM »

^Cruger was, without any doubt in my mind, the finest hymn writer in the Lutheran tradition.  One of my other favorites was "Oh dearest Jesus, what Law hast Thou broken?"  Even Bach's version of that chorale in his St. John Passion is inferior to what Cruger wrote.
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2012, 09:00:18 PM »

"O Dearest Jesus, What Law Hast Thou Broken"
By Johann Heermann, 1585-1647

1. O dearest Jesus, what law hast thou broken
That such sharp sentence should on Thee be spoken?
Of what great crime hast Thou to make confession, --
What dark transgression?

2. They crown Thy head with thorns, they smite, they scourge Thee;
With cruel mockings to the cross they urge Thee;
They give Thee gall to drink, they still decry Thee;
They crucify Thee.

3. Whence come these sorrows, whence this mortal anguish?
It is my sins for which Thou, Lord, must languish;
Yea, all the wrath, the woe, Thou dost inherit,
This I do merit.

4. What punishment so strange is suffered yonder!
The Shepherd dies for sheep that loved to wander;
The Master pays the debt His servants owe Him,
Who would not know Him.

5. The sinless Son of God must die in sadness;
The sinful child of man may live in gladness;
Man forfeited his life and is acquitted, --
God is committed.

6. There was no spot in me by sin untainted;
Sick with sin's poison, all my heart had fainted;
My heavy guilt to hell had well-nigh brought me,
Such woe it wrought me.

7. O wondrous love, whose depth no heart hath sounded,
That brought Thee here, by foes and thieves surrounded!
All worldly pleasures, heedless, I was trying
While Thou wert dying.

8. O mighty King, no time can dim Thy glory!
How shall I spread abroad Thy wondrous story?
How shall I find some worthy gifts to proffer?
What dare I offer?

9. For vainly doth our human wisdom ponder, --
Thy woes, Thy mercy, still transcend our wonder.
Oh, how should I do aught that could delight Thee!
Can I requite Thee?

10. Yet unrequited, Lord, I would not leave Thee;
I will renounce whate'er doth vex or grieve Thee
And quench with thoughts of Thee and prayers most lowly
All fires unholy.

11. But since my strength will nevermore suffice me
To crucify desires that still entice me,
To all good deeds, oh, let Thy Spirit win me
And reign within me!

12. I'll think upon Thy mercy without ceasing,
That earth's vain joys to me no more be pleasing;
To do Thy will shall be my sole endeavor
Henceforth forever.

13. Whate'er of earthly good this life may grant me,
I'll risk for Thee; no shame, no cross, shall daunt me;
I shall not fear what man can do to harm me
Nor death alarm me.

14. But worthless is my sacrifice, I own it;
Yet, Lord, for love's sake Thou wilt not disown it;
Thou wilt accept my gift in Thy great meekness
Nor shame my weakness.

15. And when, dear Lord, before Thy throne in heaven
To me the crown of joy at last is given,
Where sweetest hymns Thy saints forever raise Thee,
I, too, shall praise Thee.

The Lutheran Hymnal
Hymn #143
Text: Luke 23: 20-24
Author: Johann Heermann, 1630
Translated by: Catherine Winkworth, 1863, alt.
Titled: "Herzliebster Jesu"
Composer: Johann Crueger, 1640
Tune: "Herzlebster Jesu"
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« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2012, 09:40:35 PM »

"Salve Regina"
By Hermann of Reichenau (likely) , 1013-1054

Salve, Regina, Mater misericordiae,
vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve.
ad te clamamus exsules filii Hevae,
ad te suspiramus, gementes et flentes
in hac lacrimarum valle.

Eia, ergo, advocata nostra, illos tuos
misericordes oculos ad nos converte;
et Iesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui,
nobis post hoc exsilium ostende.
O clemens, O pia, O dulcis Virgo Maria.


Hail, holy Queen, Mother of Mercy,
our life, our sweetness and our hope.
To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve;
to thee do we send up our sighs,
mourning and weeping in this valley of tears.

Turn then, most gracious advocate,
thine eyes of mercy toward us;
and after this our exile,
show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.


Interesting enough, I have heard this chant sung at an Orthodox monastery in the US (Holy Cross Hermitage). I was pleasantly surprised.
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« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2012, 11:02:52 PM »


Interesting enough, I have heard this chant sung at an Orthodox monastery in the US (Holy Cross Hermitage). I was pleasantly surprised.

I believe that Father Seraphim was a Roman Catholic monk before he was Orthodox.  His devotion to the Theotokos was strong when I knew him at House Springs.  That this beautiful hymn would be sung there does not surprise me. 
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« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2012, 11:33:19 PM »

"Salve Regina"
By Hermann of Reichenau (likely) , 1013-1054

Thanks. I didn't know this hymn is that old.

As of my favourites, it was nice to find out after my conversion that much of my favourites were originally Orthodox hymns. Even as a Protestand I tended to like those hymns that were originally liturgical chants of the pre-Schism Latin Church. Lutherans had had this habit of remaking liturgical hymns into chorales but at least those that are sung by Finnish Lutherans are not that far from Gregorian chant.
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« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2012, 11:43:25 PM »

I have never realized how beautiful Lutheran hymns are, before.

It's not Lutheran, but I really do think that Amazing Grace is one of the best hymns that exists, Eastern or Western, Orthodox or not.
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« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2012, 11:45:24 PM »

It's not Lutheran, but I really do think that Amazing Grace is one of the best hymns that exists, Eastern or Western, Orthodox or not.

Despite the fact that it includes somewhat misguided view of salvation? police
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« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2012, 12:04:32 AM »

"Dies Irae"
by Thomas of Celano (1200 – c. 1265)

1 Dies iræ! Dies illa
Solvet sæclum in favilla:
Teste David cum Sibylla!

Day of wrath! O day of mourning!
See fulfilled the prophets' warning,
Heaven and earth in ashes burning!

2 Quantus tremor est futurus,
Quando iudex est venturus,
Cuncta stricte discussurus!    

Oh, what fear man's bosom rendeth,
when from heaven the Judge descendeth,
on whose sentence all dependeth.

3 Tuba mirum spargens sonum
Per sepulchra regionum,
Coget omnes ante thronum.    

Wondrous sound the trumpet flingeth;
through earth's sepulchers it ringeth;
all before the throne it bringeth.

4 Mors stupebit, et natura,
Cum resurget creatura,
Iudicanti responsura.    

Death is struck, and nature quaking,
all creation is awaking,
to its Judge an answer making.

5 Liber scriptus proferetur,
In quo totum continetur,
Unde mundus iudicetur.    

Lo! the book, exactly worded,
wherein all hath been recorded:
thence shall judgment be awarded.

6 Iudex ergo cum sedebit,
Quidquid latet, apparebit:
Nil inultum remanebit.    

When the Judge his seat attaineth,
and each hidden deed arraigneth,
nothing unavenged remaineth.

7 Quid sum miser tunc dicturus?
Quem patronum rogaturus,
Cum vix iustus sit securus?    

What shall I, frail man, be pleading?
Who for me be interceding,
when the just are mercy needing?

8 Rex tremendæ maiestatis,
Qui salvandos salvas gratis,
Salva me, fons pietatis.    

King of Majesty tremendous,
who dost free salvation send us,
Fount of pity, then befriend us!

9 Recordare, Iesu pie,
Quod sum causa tuæ viæ:
Ne me perdas illa die.    

Think, good Jesus, my salvation
cost thy wondrous Incarnation;
leave me not to reprobation!

10 Quærens me, sedisti lassus:
Redemisti Crucem passus:
Tantus labor non sit cassus.    

Faint and weary, thou hast sought me,
on the cross of suffering bought me.
shall such grace be vainly brought me?

11 Iuste iudex ultionis,
Donum fac remissionis
Ante diem rationis.    

Righteous Judge! for sin's pollution
grant thy gift of absolution,
ere the day of retribution.

12 Ingemisco, tamquam reus:
Culpa rubet vultus meus:
Supplicanti parce, Deus.    

Guilty, now I pour my moaning,
all my shame with anguish owning;
spare, O God, thy suppliant groaning!

13 Qui Mariam absolvisti,
Et latronem exaudisti,
Mihi quoque spem dedisti.    

Thou the sinful woman savedst;
thou the dying thief forgavest;
and to me a hope vouchsafest.

14 Preces meæ non sunt dignæ:
Sed tu bonus fac benigne,
Ne perenni cremer igne.    

Worthless are my prayers and sighing,
yet, good Lord, in grace complying,
rescue me from fires undying!

15 Inter oves locum præsta,
Et ab hædis me sequestra,
Statuens in parte dextra.    

With thy favored sheep O place me;
nor among the goats abase me;
but to thy right hand upraise me.

16 Confutatis maledictis,
Flammis acribus addictis:
Voca me cum benedictis.    

While the wicked are confounded,
doomed to flames of woe unbounded
call me with thy saints surrounded.

17 Oro supplex et acclinis,
Cor contritum quasi cinis:
Gere curam mei finis.    

Low I kneel, with heart submission,
see, like ashes, my contrition;
help me in my last condition.

18 Lacrimosa dies illa,
qua resurget ex favilla
Iudicandus homo reus.
Huic ergo parce, Deus:    

Ah! that day of tears and mourning!
From the dust of earth returning
man for judgment must prepare him;
Spare, O God, in mercy spare him!

19 Pie Iesu Domine,
dona eis requiem. Amen.    

Lord, all pitying, Jesus blest,
grant them thine eternal rest. Amen.
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« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2012, 12:09:05 AM »

"Veni, veni Emmanuel"
Unknown, 8th - 12th century

Veni, veni Emmanuel;
Captivum solve Israel,
Qui gemit in exilio,
Privatus Dei Filio.

Refrain
Gaude! Gaude! Emmanuel,
Nascetur pro te, Israel!

Veni, veni, O Oriens;
Solare nos adveniens,
Noctis depelle nebulas,
Dirasque noctis tenebras.
Refrain

Veni, Clavis Davidica!
Regna reclude caelica;
Fac iter tutum superum,
Et claude vias inferum.
Refrain

Veni, veni Adonai!
Qui populo in Sinai,
Legem dedisti vertice,
In maiestate gloriae.
Refrain

O come, O come, Emmanuel
And ransom captive Israel
That mourns in lonely exile here
Until the Son of God appear
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, Thou Day-star, come and cheer
Our spirits by Thine advent here
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night
And death's dark shadows put to flight.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, Thou Key of David, come,
And open wide our heavenly home;
Make safe the way that leads to Thee,
And close the path to misery.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come to lead us Adonai,
Who to the tribes on height of Sinai
In ancient times did'st give the Law,
In cloud, and majesty and awe.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, Thou Rod of Jesse, free
Thine own from Satan's tyranny
From depths of Hell Thy people save
And give them victory o'er the grave
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.
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« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2012, 12:25:17 AM »

It's not Lutheran, but I really do think that Amazing Grace is one of the best hymns that exists, Eastern or Western, Orthodox or not.

Despite the fact that it includes somewhat misguided view of salvation? police

Says you.

"Amazing grace! How sweet the sound
That saved a wretch like me!
I once was lost, but now am found;
Was blind, but now I see.

'Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,
And grace my fears relieved;
How precious did that grace appear
The hour I first believed.

Through many dangers, toils and snares,
I have already come;
'Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far,
And grace will lead me home.

The Lord has promised good to me,
His word my hope secures;
He will my shield and portion be,
As long as life endures.

Yea, when this flesh and heart shall fail,
And mortal life shall cease,
I shall possess, within the veil,
A life of joy and peace.

The world shall soon dissolve like snow,
The sun refuse to shine;
But God, who called me here below,
Shall be forever mine.

When we've been there ten thousand years,
Bright shining as the sun,
We've no less days to sing God's praise
Than when we'd first begun."

There is nothing in it that is misguided. 
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« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2012, 12:28:50 AM »

I believe that Father Seraphim was a Roman Catholic monk before he was Orthodox.  His devotion to the Theotokos was strong when I knew him at House Springs.  That this beautiful hymn would be sung there does not surprise me. 
Indeed. Him and several others were Roman Catholic monks at my old seminary college (years before I attended). I don't believe Holy Cross Hermitage has a single "cradle".

It certainly shocked me (in a good way) to hear it chanted (in the familiar western style no less).
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« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2012, 12:33:48 AM »

I believe that Father Seraphim was a Roman Catholic monk before he was Orthodox.  His devotion to the Theotokos was strong when I knew him at House Springs.  That this beautiful hymn would be sung there does not surprise me.
Indeed. Him and several others were Roman Catholic monks at my old seminary college (years before I attended). I don't believe Holy Cross Hermitage has a single "cradle".

It certainly shocked me (in a good way) to hear it chanted (in the familiar western style no less).
They have 4 "cradles", if I recall correctly. :-)
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« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2012, 12:37:59 AM »

The Breastplate of St. Patrick

I bind unto myself today
The strong Name of the Trinity,
By invocation of the same
The Three in One and One in Three.

I bind this today to me forever
By power of faith, Christ’s incarnation;
His baptism in Jordan river,
His death on Cross for my salvation;
His bursting from the spicèd tomb,
His riding up the heavenly way,
His coming at the day of doom
I bind unto myself today.

I bind unto myself the power
Of the great love of cherubim;
The sweet ‘Well done’ in judgment hour,
The service of the seraphim,
Confessors’ faith, Apostles’ word,
The Patriarchs’ prayers, the prophets’ scrolls,
All good deeds done unto the Lord
And purity of virgin souls.

I bind unto myself today
The virtues of the star lit heaven,
The glorious sun’s life giving ray,
The whiteness of the moon at even,
The flashing of the lightning free,
The whirling wind’s tempestuous shocks,
The stable earth, the deep salt sea
Around the old eternal rocks.

I bind unto myself today
The power of God to hold and lead,
His eye to watch, His might to stay,
His ear to hearken to my need.
The wisdom of my God to teach,
His hand to guide, His shield to ward;
The word of God to give me speech,
His heavenly host to be my guard.

Against the demon snares of sin,
The vice that gives temptation force,
The natural lusts that war within,
The hostile men that mar my course;
Or few or many, far or nigh,
In every place and in all hours,
Against their fierce hostility
I bind to me these holy powers.

Against all Satan’s spells and wiles,
Against false words of heresy,
Against the knowledge that defiles,
Against the heart’s idolatry,
Against the wizard’s evil craft,
Against the death wound and the burning,
The choking wave, the poisoned shaft,
Protect me, Christ, till Thy returning.

Christ be with me, Christ within me,
Christ behind me, Christ before me,
Christ beside me, Christ to win me,
Christ to comfort and restore me.
Christ beneath me, Christ above me,
Christ in quiet, Christ in danger,
Christ in hearts of all that love me,
Christ in mouth of friend and stranger.

I bind unto myself the Name,
The strong Name of the Trinity,
By invocation of the same,
The Three in One and One in Three.
By Whom all nature hath creation,
Eternal Father, Spirit, Word:
Praise to the Lord of my salvation,
Salvation is of Christ the Lord.
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« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2012, 12:50:39 AM »

I believe that Father Seraphim was a Roman Catholic monk before he was Orthodox.  His devotion to the Theotokos was strong when I knew him at House Springs.  That this beautiful hymn would be sung there does not surprise me.
Indeed. Him and several others were Roman Catholic monks at my old seminary college (years before I attended). I don't believe Holy Cross Hermitage has a single "cradle".

It certainly shocked me (in a good way) to hear it chanted (in the familiar western style no less).
They have 4 "cradles", if I recall correctly. :-)
Truly? I didn't know there were any, let alone that many. Thanks for telling me.
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« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2012, 12:51:20 AM »

Beautiful, That Person!
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« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2012, 12:52:38 AM »

Another western hymn (though it's really just a portion of a psalm popularized in the west).

Non Nobis

Non nobis, non nobis, Domine
Sed nomini tuo da gloriam.


Not to us, not to us, O Lord,
But to your name give glory.
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« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2012, 02:51:34 AM »

So many beautiful hymns here!

My favorite, though...must be the Salve, Regina. And yes, I love hearing them sing it at Compline in the monastery! Fr. Seraphim spent many years as a Catholic monk (Benedictine, IIRC). I believe Vladyka George is also a former Catholic, among several others.

I, too, wasn't aware of four cradle Orthodox at Holy Cross. I can only think of one! They're a wonderful group over there. I need to get out to see them again. It's been too long (I think the last time I was out there was last October for their 25th anniversary weekend...shameful of me!)
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« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2012, 03:05:10 AM »

Oh, and let's not forget Stabat Mater:

At the Cross her station keeping,
stood the mournful Mother weeping,
close to her Son to the last.

Through her heart, His sorrow sharing,
all His bitter anguish bearing,
now at length the sword has passed.

O how sad and sore distressed
was that Mother, highly blest,
of the sole-begotten One.

Christ above in torment hangs,
she beneath beholds the pangs
of her dying glorious Son.

Is there one who would not weep,
whelmed in miseries so deep,
Christ's dear Mother to behold?

Can the human heart refrain
from partaking in her pain,
in that Mother's pain untold?

For the sins of His own nation,
She saw Jesus wracked with torment,
All with scourges rent:

She beheld her tender Child,
Saw Him hang in desolation,
Till His spirit forth He sent.

O thou Mother! fount of love!
Touch my spirit from above,
make my heart with thine accord:

Make me feel as thou hast felt;
make my soul to glow and melt
with the love of Christ my Lord.

Holy Mother! pierce me through,
in my heart each wound renew
of my Savior crucified:

Let me share with thee His pain,
who for all my sins was slain,
who for me in torments died.

Let me mingle tears with thee,
mourning Him who mourned for me,
all the days that I may live:

By the Cross with thee to stay,
there with thee to weep and pray,
is all I ask of thee to give.

Virgin of all virgins blest!,
Listen to my fond request:
let me share thy grief divine;

Let me, to my latest breath,
in my body bear the death
of that dying Son of thine.

Wounded with His every wound,
steep my soul till it hath swooned,
in His very Blood away;

Be to me, O Virgin, nigh,
lest in flames I burn and die,
in His awful Judgment Day.

Christ, when Thou shalt call me hence,
by Thy Mother my defense,
by Thy Cross my victory;

While my body here decays,
may my soul Thy goodness praise,
Safe in Paradise with Thee.

Translation by Edward Caswall
Lyra Catholica (1849)
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« Reply #20 on: February 19, 2012, 04:22:20 AM »

I don't like Stabat Mater. Salve Regina is great, though.

Is this thread just for Northern Europeans/Lutherans? I quite prefer the Mozarabic way myself...must be my faux-Hispanicness showing through, but it just gets me in a way that later Gregorian and other chant forms do not. Particularly when done properly by people who don't take it to be "Arabic" just because it's in the name...the Mozarabs were Latins in an Arabized cultural milieu, after all, not the other way around (I suppose that would be the Maltese).

Anyway, take a listen to a portion of the antifon of León (AD 1069 , apparently copied from an earlier manuscript dated AD 672). Be in heaven. Smiley

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« Reply #21 on: February 19, 2012, 04:34:48 AM »

"Dies Irae"
by Thomas of Celano (1200 – c. 1265)

1 Dies iræ! Dies illa
Solvet sæclum in favilla:
Teste David cum Sibylla!

Day of wrath! O day of mourning!
See fulfilled the prophets' warning,
Heaven and earth in ashes burning!

2 Quantus tremor est futurus,
Quando iudex est venturus,
Cuncta stricte discussurus!    

Oh, what fear man's bosom rendeth,
when from heaven the Judge descendeth,
on whose sentence all dependeth.

3 Tuba mirum spargens sonum
Per sepulchra regionum,
Coget omnes ante thronum.    

Wondrous sound the trumpet flingeth;
through earth's sepulchers it ringeth;
all before the throne it bringeth.

4 Mors stupebit, et natura,
Cum resurget creatura,
Iudicanti responsura.    

Death is struck, and nature quaking,
all creation is awaking,
to its Judge an answer making.

5 Liber scriptus proferetur,
In quo totum continetur,
Unde mundus iudicetur.    

Lo! the book, exactly worded,
wherein all hath been recorded:
thence shall judgment be awarded.

6 Iudex ergo cum sedebit,
Quidquid latet, apparebit:
Nil inultum remanebit.    

When the Judge his seat attaineth,
and each hidden deed arraigneth,
nothing unavenged remaineth.

7 Quid sum miser tunc dicturus?
Quem patronum rogaturus,
Cum vix iustus sit securus?    

What shall I, frail man, be pleading?
Who for me be interceding,
when the just are mercy needing?

8 Rex tremendæ maiestatis,
Qui salvandos salvas gratis,
Salva me, fons pietatis.    

King of Majesty tremendous,
who dost free salvation send us,
Fount of pity, then befriend us!

9 Recordare, Iesu pie,
Quod sum causa tuæ viæ:
Ne me perdas illa die.    

Think, good Jesus, my salvation
cost thy wondrous Incarnation;
leave me not to reprobation!

10 Quærens me, sedisti lassus:
Redemisti Crucem passus:
Tantus labor non sit cassus.    

Faint and weary, thou hast sought me,
on the cross of suffering bought me.
shall such grace be vainly brought me?

11 Iuste iudex ultionis,
Donum fac remissionis
Ante diem rationis.    

Righteous Judge! for sin's pollution
grant thy gift of absolution,
ere the day of retribution.

12 Ingemisco, tamquam reus:
Culpa rubet vultus meus:
Supplicanti parce, Deus.    

Guilty, now I pour my moaning,
all my shame with anguish owning;
spare, O God, thy suppliant groaning!

13 Qui Mariam absolvisti,
Et latronem exaudisti,
Mihi quoque spem dedisti.    

Thou the sinful woman savedst;
thou the dying thief forgavest;
and to me a hope vouchsafest.

14 Preces meæ non sunt dignæ:
Sed tu bonus fac benigne,
Ne perenni cremer igne.    

Worthless are my prayers and sighing,
yet, good Lord, in grace complying,
rescue me from fires undying!

15 Inter oves locum præsta,
Et ab hædis me sequestra,
Statuens in parte dextra.    

With thy favored sheep O place me;
nor among the goats abase me;
but to thy right hand upraise me.

16 Confutatis maledictis,
Flammis acribus addictis:
Voca me cum benedictis.    

While the wicked are confounded,
doomed to flames of woe unbounded
call me with thy saints surrounded.

17 Oro supplex et acclinis,
Cor contritum quasi cinis:
Gere curam mei finis.    

Low I kneel, with heart submission,
see, like ashes, my contrition;
help me in my last condition.

18 Lacrimosa dies illa,
qua resurget ex favilla
Iudicandus homo reus.
Huic ergo parce, Deus:    

Ah! that day of tears and mourning!
From the dust of earth returning
man for judgment must prepare him;
Spare, O God, in mercy spare him!

19 Pie Iesu Domine,
dona eis requiem. Amen.    

Lord, all pitying, Jesus blest,
grant them thine eternal rest. Amen.
The Gregorian setting of this hymn is one of the tunes most frequently quoted in classical music. Rachmaninoff quoted it in his Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, his Second Symphony, and his Isle of the Dead. I recently played it in Camille Saint-Saens' Danse Macabre. It's said that the same Saint-Saens even included a parody of the hymn tune in the finale of his Organ Symphony.
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« Reply #22 on: February 19, 2012, 10:32:09 AM »

I've always liked the 8th century Irish hymn, Be Thou My Vision.

Be Thou my Vision, O Lord of my heart;
Naught be all else to me, save that Thou art.
Thou my best Thought, by day or by night,
Waking or sleeping, Thy presence my light.

Be Thou my Wisdom, and Thou my true Word;
I ever with Thee and Thou with me, Lord;
Thou my great Father, I Thy true son;
Thou in me dwelling, and I with Thee one.

Be Thou my battle Shield, Sword for the fight;
Be Thou my Dignity, Thou my Delight;
Thou my soul’s Shelter, Thou my high Tower:
Raise Thou me heavenward, O Power of my power.

Riches I heed not, nor man’s empty praise,
Thou mine Inheritance, now and always:
Thou and Thou only, first in my heart,
High King of Heaven, my Treasure Thou art.

High King of Heaven, my victory won,
May I reach Heaven’s joys, O bright Heaven’s Sun!
Heart of my own heart, whatever befall,
Still be my Vision, O Ruler of all.

Quote
From Wikipedia:

The music is the Irish folk song, Slane, which is about Slane Hill where in A.D. 433 St. Patrick defied the pagan High King Lóegaire of Tara by lighting candles on Easter Eve. Besides this general connection to Christianity, the folk song has little prior connection to the text. The two were first combined by Welsh composer David Evans in the 1927 edition of the Church of Scotland's Church Hymnary.
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« Reply #23 on: February 19, 2012, 11:12:19 AM »

yes, this song has always captured me in awe and reverence of God.
would be great if there was a modern english translation.
i have fond memories of singing it many years ago in liverpool's catholic cathedral (as we marched towards the anglican cathedral as the liverpool Christians used to do once a year in a show of faith), accompanying the sounds of hundreds of voices by playing the 'drums' on my cycle helmet!
(i was young...)
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« Reply #24 on: February 19, 2012, 11:33:11 AM »

It's not Lutheran, but I really do think that Amazing Grace is one of the best hymns that exists, Eastern or Western, Orthodox or not.

Despite the fact that it includes somewhat misguided view of salvation? police
And a barely disguised contempt for the created world.
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« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2012, 03:41:54 PM »

Takes on Amazing Grace.

The Blind Boys from Alabama:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pR1tOVd4PCk
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« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2012, 03:47:40 PM »

Hard to get across Shape Note / Sacred Harp if you ain't in the square.

Greenwich

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJCC4Nrvvw0

This is American Orthodox Hymnography.
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« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2012, 03:55:48 PM »

Because you loved the above and we are heading toward Pascha . . .

Quote
'He dies, the friend of sinners dies' (SH 163, 'Morning') and 'The Lord is ris'n indeed!' (SH 236, Easter Anthem), both appropriate to the Easter Season.

Here are the words to 'Morning,'as here sung:

He dies, the friend of sinners dies.
Lo, Salem's daughters weep around;
A solemn darkness veils the skies,
A sudden trembling shakes the ground.

Here's love and grief beyond degree:
The Lord of glory dies for men:
But lo! what sudden joys we see!
Jesus, the dead revives again.

The rising God forsakes the tomb:
Up to His Father's throne He flies,
Cherubic legions guard Him home
And shout Him welcome to the skies. (Isaac Watts, 1709)

These are the words to Billings' 'Easter Anthem':

The Lord is ris'n indeed! Hallelujah!
Now is Christ risen from the dead
And become the first-fruits of them that slept. Hallelujah!
And did He rise? Did He rise?
Hear it, ye nations, hear it o ye dead!
He rose, he rose, he burst the bars of death,
He burst the bars of death and triumphed o'er the grave.
Then, then, then I rose,
Then first humanity triumphant passed the crystal ports of light
And seized eternal youth!
Man, all immortal hail, hail,
heaven, all lavish with strange gifts to man,
Thine's all the glory, man's the boundless bliss! (Edward Young)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wlz70-TfcaI

Christ is Risen, indeed!

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« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2012, 04:32:47 PM »

It's not Lutheran, but I really do think that Amazing Grace is one of the best hymns that exists, Eastern or Western, Orthodox or not.

Despite the fact that it includes somewhat misguided view of salvation? police
And a barely disguised contempt for the created world.

I see none of that.  The hymn is autobiographical.  Do you know anything about the author?
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« Reply #29 on: February 19, 2012, 04:40:31 PM »

An old communion hymn.  Another melody by Crueger.

"Soul, Adorn Thyself with Gladness"
By Johann Franck, 1618-1677

1. Soul, adorn thyself with gladness,
Leave behind all gloom and sadness;
Come into the daylight's splendor,
There with joy thy praises render
Unto Him whose grace unbounded
Hath this woundrous supper founded.
High o'er all the heavens He reigneth,
Yet to dwell with thee He deigneth.

2. Hasten as a bride to meet Him
And with loving reverence greet Him;
For with words of life immortal
Now He knocketh at thy portal.
Haste to ope the gates before Him,
Saying, while thou dost adore Him,
Suffer, Lord, that I receive Thee,
And I nevermore will leave Thee.

3. He who craves a precious treasure
Neither cost nor pain will measure;
But the priceless gifts of heaven
God to us hath freely given.
Though the wealth of earth were proffered,
Naught would buy the fits here offered:
Christ's true body, for thee riven,
And His blood, for thee once given.

4. Ah, how hungers all my spirit
For the love I do not merit!
Oft have I, with sighs fast thronging,
Thought upon this food with longing,
In the battle well-nigh worsted,
For this cup of life have thirsted,
For the Friend who here invites us
And to God Himself unites us.

5. In my heart I find ascending
Holy awe, with rapture blending,
As this mystery I ponder,
Filling all my soul with wonder,
Bearing witness at this hour
Of the greatness of Thy power;
Far beyond all human telling
Is the power within Him dwelling.

6. Human reason, though it ponder,
Cannot fathom this great wonder
That Christ's body e'er remaineth
Though it countless souls sustaineth,
And that He His blood is giving
With the wine we are receiving.
These great mysteries unsounded
Are by God alone expounded.

7. Jesus, Sun of Life, my Splendor,
Jesus, Thou my Friend most tender,
Jesus, Joy of my desiring,
Fount of life, my soul inspiring, --
At Thy feet I cry, my Maker,
Let me be a fit partaker
Of this blessed food from heaven,
For our good, Thy glory, given.

8. Lord, by love and mercy driven
Thou hast left Thy throne in heaven
On the cross for us to languish
And to die in bitter anguish,
To forego all joy and gladness
And to shed Thy blood in sadness.
By this blood, redeemed and living,
Lord, I praise Thee with thanksgiving.

9. Jesus, Bread of Life, I pray Thee,
Let me gladly here obey Thee.
By Thy love I am invited,
Be Thy love with love requited;
From this Supper let me measure,
Lord, how vast and deep love's treasure.
Though the gifts Thou here dost give me
As Thy guest in heaven receive me.

Hymn #305
The Lutheran Hymnal
Text: Rev. 19: 8
Author: Johann Franck, 1649
Translated by: Catherine Winkworth, 1858, alt.
Titled: "Schmuecke dich, o liebe Seele"
Composer: Johann Crueger, 1649
Tune: "Schmuecke dich"

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« Reply #30 on: February 19, 2012, 05:09:49 PM »

orthonorm, that shape note singing was like nothing i heard before! sounds great.
but can u tell us the words they were singing?
to me, it sounded like:
'aaa ooo bababa bababa aaa ooo eeee'
(a bit like coptic with added bababa-ing).
was it in english?
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« Reply #31 on: February 19, 2012, 05:32:15 PM »

orthonorm, that shape note singing was like nothing i heard before! sounds great.
but can u tell us the words they were singing?
to me, it sounded like:
'aaa ooo bababa bababa aaa ooo eeee'
(a bit like coptic with added bababa-ing).
was it in english?

Sacred Harp is something you do more than listen to. It's crazy.

That hymn begins with singing scales. EDIT: Then it gets into the "singing". Often you can spend an hour just doing scales. It is not done properly during "church". It if often a many hour event and people come and go. And you sing. You don't watch. To be "inside" the square is outsane. Even with "poor" singers the experience is tremendous.

The lyrics to this hymn (properly) are:

Quote
Lord, what a thoughtless wretch was I,
To mourn, and murmur, and repine,
To see the wicked placed on high,
In pride and robes of honor shine.
But, oh, their end, their dreadful end,
Thy sanctuary taught me so,
On slipp’ry rocks I see them stand,
And fiery billows roll below.

http://fasola.org/indexes/1991/?p=183

More on Sacred Harp:

http://fasola.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Harp
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« Reply #32 on: February 19, 2012, 05:41:08 PM »

Verses from Amazing Grace incorporated into a traditional Sacred Harp hymn:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbNh7aPzcMw
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« Reply #33 on: February 19, 2012, 05:49:45 PM »

Sacred Harp goes to Eastern Europe . . . I'll knock it off now. It's just that this is some of the stuff I grew up with and it is weird almost no one knows of it.

It's soon to become a cultural artifact from the past and nothing else, if new life ain't breathed into it by real Christians. I showed up at a sing and eat here in the city once. Some old timers but a lot of just arts and crafts folks who could just as easily be yodeling or doing Buddhist chant the next day.

This is something unique to the US and truly uncanny and easily picked up and done.

To Poland with Love (you can see how quickly even in another language these folks were able to pick up the system with lotsa help of course):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NkG7vm50Ns
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« Reply #34 on: February 19, 2012, 11:33:24 PM »

"Dies Irae"
by Thomas of Celano (1200 – c. 1265)

1 Dies iræ! Dies illa
Solvet sæclum in favilla:
Teste David cum Sibylla!

Day of wrath! O day of mourning!
See fulfilled the prophets' warning,
Heaven and earth in ashes burning!

2 Quantus tremor est futurus,
Quando iudex est venturus,
Cuncta stricte discussurus!    

Oh, what fear man's bosom rendeth,
when from heaven the Judge descendeth,
on whose sentence all dependeth.

3 Tuba mirum spargens sonum
Per sepulchra regionum,
Coget omnes ante thronum.    

Wondrous sound the trumpet flingeth;
through earth's sepulchers it ringeth;
all before the throne it bringeth.

4 Mors stupebit, et natura,
Cum resurget creatura,
Iudicanti responsura.    

Death is struck, and nature quaking,
all creation is awaking,
to its Judge an answer making.

5 Liber scriptus proferetur,
In quo totum continetur,
Unde mundus iudicetur.    

Lo! the book, exactly worded,
wherein all hath been recorded:
thence shall judgment be awarded.

6 Iudex ergo cum sedebit,
Quidquid latet, apparebit:
Nil inultum remanebit.    

When the Judge his seat attaineth,
and each hidden deed arraigneth,
nothing unavenged remaineth.

7 Quid sum miser tunc dicturus?
Quem patronum rogaturus,
Cum vix iustus sit securus?    

What shall I, frail man, be pleading?
Who for me be interceding,
when the just are mercy needing?

8 Rex tremendæ maiestatis,
Qui salvandos salvas gratis,
Salva me, fons pietatis.    

King of Majesty tremendous,
who dost free salvation send us,
Fount of pity, then befriend us!

9 Recordare, Iesu pie,
Quod sum causa tuæ viæ:
Ne me perdas illa die.    

Think, good Jesus, my salvation
cost thy wondrous Incarnation;
leave me not to reprobation!

10 Quærens me, sedisti lassus:
Redemisti Crucem passus:
Tantus labor non sit cassus.    

Faint and weary, thou hast sought me,
on the cross of suffering bought me.
shall such grace be vainly brought me?

11 Iuste iudex ultionis,
Donum fac remissionis
Ante diem rationis.    

Righteous Judge! for sin's pollution
grant thy gift of absolution,
ere the day of retribution.

12 Ingemisco, tamquam reus:
Culpa rubet vultus meus:
Supplicanti parce, Deus.    

Guilty, now I pour my moaning,
all my shame with anguish owning;
spare, O God, thy suppliant groaning!

13 Qui Mariam absolvisti,
Et latronem exaudisti,
Mihi quoque spem dedisti.    

Thou the sinful woman savedst;
thou the dying thief forgavest;
and to me a hope vouchsafest.

14 Preces meæ non sunt dignæ:
Sed tu bonus fac benigne,
Ne perenni cremer igne.    

Worthless are my prayers and sighing,
yet, good Lord, in grace complying,
rescue me from fires undying!

15 Inter oves locum præsta,
Et ab hædis me sequestra,
Statuens in parte dextra.    

With thy favored sheep O place me;
nor among the goats abase me;
but to thy right hand upraise me.

16 Confutatis maledictis,
Flammis acribus addictis:
Voca me cum benedictis.    

While the wicked are confounded,
doomed to flames of woe unbounded
call me with thy saints surrounded.

17 Oro supplex et acclinis,
Cor contritum quasi cinis:
Gere curam mei finis.    

Low I kneel, with heart submission,
see, like ashes, my contrition;
help me in my last condition.

18 Lacrimosa dies illa,
qua resurget ex favilla
Iudicandus homo reus.
Huic ergo parce, Deus:    

Ah! that day of tears and mourning!
From the dust of earth returning
man for judgment must prepare him;
Spare, O God, in mercy spare him!

19 Pie Iesu Domine,
dona eis requiem. Amen.    

Lord, all pitying, Jesus blest,
grant them thine eternal rest. Amen.

Whoever translated this is really bad at Latin.
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« Reply #35 on: February 20, 2012, 12:00:13 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aZroLne_P0&feature=youtube_gdata_player

My favorite sacred harp "performance" ever. Not to be dramatic, but it is one of the most moving songs I have ever heard.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 12:03:17 AM by Ionnis » Logged

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« Reply #36 on: February 20, 2012, 12:31:35 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aZroLne_P0&feature=youtube_gdata_player

My favorite sacred harp "performance" ever. Not to be dramatic, but it is one of the most moving songs I have ever heard.

Ionnis, how did you come to know sacred harp?

Have you sang in before?
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« Reply #37 on: February 20, 2012, 12:57:27 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aZroLne_P0&feature=youtube_gdata_player

My favorite sacred harp "performance" ever. Not to be dramatic, but it is one of the most moving songs I have ever heard.

Ionnis, how did you come to know sacred harp?

Have you sang in before?

No. An acquaintance of mine who does sing in it introduced me to it about three years ago. I had never heard of it until then.
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"If you cannot find Christ in the beggar at the church door, you will not find Him in the chalice.”  -The Divine John Chrysostom

“Till we can become divine, we must be content to be human, lest in our hurry for change we sink to something lower.” -Anthony Trollope
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« Reply #38 on: February 20, 2012, 01:14:14 AM »

Well this is just incredible.

Gaelic Psalms from the island of Lewis, which is apparently something of a bastion of very traditional Presbyterianism. I don't recall anything even remotely like this when I was a young Presbyterian lad! Sad
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« Reply #39 on: February 20, 2012, 01:49:15 AM »

Spiritus Sanctus - Hildegard Von Bingen

Spiritus Sanctus vivificans vita

Spiritus Sanctus vivificans vita,
movens omnia,
et radix est in omni creatura,
ac omnia de immunditia abluit,
tergens crimina,
ac ungit vulnera,
et sic est fulgens ac laudabilis vita,
suscitans et resuscitans omnia.

Holy Spirit, bestowing life unto life

Holy Spirit, bestowing life unto life,
moving in All.
You are the root of all creatures,
washing away all impurity,
scouring guilt,
and anointing wounds.
Thus you are luminous and praiseworthy, Life,
awakening, and re-awakening all that is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJEfyZSvg5c
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Dominika
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« Reply #40 on: February 20, 2012, 07:38:47 AM »

I appreciate much more Eastern hymnography, however there are a few Western hymns I really like. One of them is Rorate Caeli (for the Advent).
All the rest is sung in Holy Week (probably because after the liturgical reform most of hymns stopped to be chant, however fortunately the majority of liturgical practice in the Holy Week was maintained): Pange Lingua from the Maundy Thursday (I like it also in Polish), Exsultet from Paschal Vigil) (but it is not so beautiful as the Paschal Canon), Victimae paschali laudes – the Easter’s sequence (I love Polish setting of it  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZClMcY5oflw, but I also like the original one – latin – for me it sounds mystically).
I also love this hymn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWqG_tDHE7s “Odszedl Pasterz od nas” – “Our Shepherd has gone”. It has beautiful and deep lyrics, but I think there is no English translation because this hymn has Polish origin and it is chanted in the end of the evening service of the Good Friday, for the burial of Christ.
I don't count such hymns as Te Deum or or Crucem Tuam, because we use them in the Orthodox Church.
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« Reply #41 on: February 20, 2012, 11:02:29 AM »

Sacred Harp goes to Eastern Europe . . . I'll knock it off now. It's just that this is some of the stuff I grew up with and it is weird almost no one knows of it.

It's soon to become a cultural artifact from the past and nothing else, if new life ain't breathed into it by real Christians. I showed up at a sing and eat here in the city once. Some old timers but a lot of just arts and crafts folks who could just as easily be yodeling or doing Buddhist chant the next day.

This is something unique to the US and truly uncanny and easily picked up and done.

To Poland with Love (you can see how quickly even in another language these folks were able to pick up the system with lotsa help of course):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NkG7vm50Ns

I didn't think anyone hadn't heard of shape note singing.  The one mennonite church nearby does sacred harp every monday night.  I should have the wife shuck on a jean skirt, pastel blouse, and bonnet and take her shape note singing.
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Andrew21091
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« Reply #42 on: February 20, 2012, 12:11:20 PM »

I've been listening to a lot of compositions by Arvo Pärt. He is Orthodox but does a lot of Latin hymns.

Here are my two favorites:

"Magnificat"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1A6BfyhFSVQ

"De Profundis"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhcYvl0Cxh0



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« Reply #43 on: February 20, 2012, 04:47:19 PM »

username! there is life outside the usa...
 Wink
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« Reply #44 on: February 20, 2012, 04:49:46 PM »

Oh Mabsoota...now you're just talking crazy... Wink
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