OrthodoxChristianity.net
October 30, 2014, 01:50:15 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Orthodox novelists  (Read 1835 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« on: January 12, 2012, 10:21:41 AM »

 I have noticed that some believers were started on their 'journey' towards God - on their being drawn to him - by the Russian novelists, whose writings are steeped in an Orthodox ethos. I thought of dipping into the Russian novelists, but my problem is (inter alia) that there are rather a number of them, and they are (I believe) of rather different styles from each other: Solzhenitsin, Tolstoy, Dostoievsky... I would have no idea where to start. Have you any recommendations?

Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
FormerReformer
Convertodox of the convertodox
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: I'll take (e) for "all of the above"
Posts: 2,438



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2012, 10:34:40 AM »

Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov.
Logged

"Funny," said Lancelot, "how the people who can't pray say that prayers are not answered, however much the people who can pray say they are."  TH White

Oh, no: I've succumbed to Hyperdoxy!
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Offline Offline

Posts: 30,096


Goodbye for now, my friend


« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2012, 10:40:46 AM »

I have the most experience with Dostoevsky (of Solzhenitsyn I've only read his Gulag Archipelago), and for him I'd say The Brothers Karamazov for something more religious, Notes From Underground for something more angsty/existentialy, and Crime and Punishment for something more along the lines of a regular novel.
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin
Adela
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Posts: 796



« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2012, 10:44:00 AM »

Tolstoy wrote some short stories which are particularly moving. Master and Man, about sacrificing for another. Family Happiness is my favorite, about the struggles of marriage.

Logged
moronikos
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: ...and they were first called Christians in Antioch
Posts: 150


I'm trying to think, but nothing happens!


WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2012, 11:59:37 AM »

Well, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy are great.  However, I believe Tolstoy was excommunicated.  He seems to rant against the church in some of his later writings.  My favorite short story by Tolstoy is about an angel who falls to earth--"What Men Live By".  My favorite Dostoevsky novel is The Idiot.
Logged
Patty Joanna
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6



« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2012, 02:38:16 PM »

Our parish read The Brothers Karamazov with our former priest as a book study a couple of years ago.  The priest has a PhD in Russian history, and was himself influenced by the Russian writers. 

He recommended that we use the new-ish English translations by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky.  This team tooke care to understand the Orthodox faith in which the Russian culture (and therefore these novels) are immersed:  they attended St. Vladimir Theological Seminary, for one thing. 

This leads to less "westernizing" of the books in translation. 
Logged
Cognomen
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: Phyletism Rules, OK
Posts: 1,968


Ungrateful Biped


« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2012, 03:20:01 PM »

Welcome aboard, Patty. 

I agree with the advice on the Pevear and Volokhonsky translations. They try (and succeed, in my opinion) to keep the "feeling" of the works, e.g. poetry and songs included in the books retain their meaning.  This should resolate with anyone who has struggled to appreciate the translations of St. Nikolai of Ohrid's hymns in the prologue.

Great question though, David.  Personally, literature in general, as well as Orthodox authors, contributed greatly to my finding of and gravitation to Orthodoxy. A RC friend simultaneously recommended Gulag Archipelago, the newer translations of Dostoevsky, and overloaded me with Thomist works. The former stuck, while the latter did not.  Smiley
Logged

North American Eastern Orthodox Parish Council Delegate for the Canonization of Saints Twin Towers and Pentagon, as well as the Propagation of the Doctrine of the Assumption of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 (NAEOPCDCSTTPPDAMAFM®).
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2012, 05:43:25 PM »

Thanks for all this so far - and keep any further insights and suggestions coming! I shall start keeping an eye out for the ones most recommended in charity shops, where they often appear and are on sale for less than a couple of quid.
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
FormerReformer
Convertodox of the convertodox
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: I'll take (e) for "all of the above"
Posts: 2,438



WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2012, 06:12:40 PM »

Thanks for all this so far - and keep any further insights and suggestions coming! I shall start keeping an eye out for the ones most recommended in charity shops, where they often appear and are on sale for less than a couple of quid.

If you're going to be browsing used books at charity shops anyway (and thus not able to come across the newer translations mentioned by Patty and Cognomen) you might as well start reading one of the translations of Dosteyevsky or Tolstoy that Project Gutenberg has up. If you have a smart phone, Kindle, or tablet you can even take them with you in eBook format.
Logged

"Funny," said Lancelot, "how the people who can't pray say that prayers are not answered, however much the people who can pray say they are."  TH White

Oh, no: I've succumbed to Hyperdoxy!
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2012, 12:50:52 PM »

Quote
the newer translations mentioned by Patty and Cognomen

Thank you for this clarification: I hadn't registered that these versions were newer.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2012, 12:53:07 PM by David Young » Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 6,887



« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2012, 02:58:43 PM »

IIRC Father Seraphim of Platina recommended David Copperfield by Charles Dickens.
Logged

David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2012, 05:36:40 PM »

Quote
Christ, the Archetype of the perfected man, never laughed, there being no evidence in Scripture of His having had a sense of humor.

But surely there is abundant evidence in creation, as we look at some of the strange creatures he so lovingly made, that he has such a sense. Is he less than Ramandu, who formed the Dufflepuds?
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,303


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2012, 05:44:34 PM »

Many Orthodox Priests have recommended the books by C.S. Lewis, especially the Space Trilogy.
Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
FormerReformer
Convertodox of the convertodox
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: I'll take (e) for "all of the above"
Posts: 2,438



WWW
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2012, 05:48:55 PM »

Many Orthodox Priests have recommended the books by C.S. Lewis, especially the Space Trilogy.

Given his comment above, I am sure that Mr Young has read plenty of C S Lewis  laugh
Logged

"Funny," said Lancelot, "how the people who can't pray say that prayers are not answered, however much the people who can pray say they are."  TH White

Oh, no: I've succumbed to Hyperdoxy!
Iconodule
Uranopolitan
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA (Diocese of Eastern Pennsylvania)
Posts: 7,048


"My god is greater."


« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2012, 05:54:17 PM »

Quote
Christ, the Archetype of the perfected man, never laughed, there being no evidence in Scripture of His having had a sense of humor.

But surely there is abundant evidence in creation, as we look at some of the strange creatures he so lovingly made, that he has such a sense. Is he less than Ramandu, who formed the Dufflepuds?


I found God making at least one joke in the Book of Job.
Logged

"A riddle or the cricket's cry
Is to doubt a fit reply." - William Blake
Adela
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Posts: 796



« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2012, 09:45:31 PM »

The Kitchen Madonna by Rumer Godden is a wonderful story which might good for a short break while you are working through the great Russian writers.  It's back in print, finally.    Smiley. It's  about a self-absorbed boy who learns to look outside of his own little world in the creation of an icon. The family, in Great Britain, has a Ukrainian Orthodox immigrant working for them as a cook.  She is sad and confides to the children that she longs for a icon in the kitchen to make it into a happy place.  So they embark on finding and creating an icon of Mary and the infant Jesus, and they learn about giving to others.
Logged
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2012, 04:30:46 AM »

... Mr Young has read plenty of C S Lewis 

...and relished especially Narnia and The great Divorce. (And of course Tolkien.)
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2012, 04:34:15 AM »

...to look outside of his own little world in the creation of an icon.

Getting off the point, but I have particularly enjoyed looking at icons written in Arbëresh.
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 6,887



« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2012, 07:10:49 AM »

Quote
Christ, the Archetype of the perfected man, never laughed, there being no evidence in Scripture of His having had a sense of humor.

But surely there is abundant evidence in creation, as we look at some of the strange creatures he so lovingly made, that he has such a sense. Is he less than Ramandu, who formed the Dufflepuds?


It's a joke. Since you're already a second poster who takes that too seriously maybe I should add smiley or something.
Logged

David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2012, 08:06:20 AM »

a second poster who takes that too seriously

But if your words were true, would that not mean the two were conforming more nearly to the image of God?
 Wink
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,303


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2012, 05:14:20 PM »

... Mr Young has read plenty of C S Lewis  

...and relished especially Narnia and The great Divorce. (And of course Tolkien.)

Did you enjoy his Space Trilogy?

I have read them at least three times.
If we have some more cold weather, I may just curl up and read them once again.
There are so many lessons to learn. C.S. Lewis is an awesome writer.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2012, 05:16:12 PM by Maria » Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2012, 05:40:21 AM »

Did you enjoy his Space Trilogy?

I relished the first two, but couldn't get on with the third.
 Sad
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,303


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2012, 10:29:17 PM »

Did you enjoy his Space Trilogy?

I relished the first two, but couldn't get on with the third.
 Sad

Yes, That Hideous Strength is different. It took two readings before I realized the underlying positions. It seems like C.S. Lewis was condemning the Nazi eugenists who were prevalent during WWII and their weird experiments, hence the worship of the decapitated head.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2012, 10:30:13 PM by Maria » Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
Patty Joanna
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6



« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2012, 09:50:37 PM »

Did you enjoy his Space Trilogy?

I relished the first two, but couldn't get on with the third.
 Sad

:0)  That's funny--because the first two were not that great for me, but I read #3 at least three times cover to cover to cover to cover to cover to cover. 

That was a long time ago--long before I had heard of the Orthodox Church--so I wonder how my reading preferences have changed. 
Logged
Iconodule
Uranopolitan
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA (Diocese of Eastern Pennsylvania)
Posts: 7,048


"My god is greater."


« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2012, 10:06:04 PM »

I'm not sure how much he can really be called an "Orthodox novelist", perhaps more like a writer who happened to be Orthodox, but I really love Nikolai Gogol.
Logged

"A riddle or the cricket's cry
Is to doubt a fit reply." - William Blake
JamesRottnek
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Anglican
Jurisdiction: Episcopal Diocese of Arizona
Posts: 5,121


I am Bibleman; putting 'the' back in the Ukraine


« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2012, 09:59:48 PM »

Are there any Greeks, or Serbs, or Arabs who are Orthodox and novelists?  It seems the only people ever spoken of are Russians.
Logged

I know a secret about a former Supreme Court Justice.  Can you guess what it is?

The greatest tragedy in the world is when a cigarette ends.

American Spirits - the eco-friendly cigarette.

Preston Robert Kinney (September 8th, 1997-August 14, 2011
Iconodule
Uranopolitan
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA (Diocese of Eastern Pennsylvania)
Posts: 7,048


"My god is greater."


« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2012, 10:02:24 PM »

Are there any Greeks, or Serbs, or Arabs who are Orthodox and novelists?  It seems the only people ever spoken of are Russians.

From Greece, there's Papadiamandis: http://this-side-of-glory.com/books-and-tea/books/the-greek-dostoyevsky/

Do epic poets count? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petar_II_Petrovi%C4%87-Njego%C5%A1
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shota_Rustaveli
« Last Edit: January 21, 2012, 10:03:41 PM by Iconodule » Logged

"A riddle or the cricket's cry
Is to doubt a fit reply." - William Blake
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Offline Offline

Posts: 30,096


Goodbye for now, my friend


« Reply #27 on: January 21, 2012, 10:31:12 PM »

Using Wiki I found these, though I don't know to what extent they incorporated orthodox ideas into their work...

George Leonardos (1937-Present, Greek)
Nikos Kazantzakis (1883-1957, anathematized Greek)
Miloš Crnjanski (1893-1977, Serbian)
Borislav Pekić (1930-1992, Serbian)
Isidora Sekulić (1877-1958, Serbian)
Svetlana Velmar-Janković (1933-Present, Serbian)
Elias Khoury (1948-Present, Lebanese)
Mircea Eliade (1907-1986, Romanian)
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin
JamesRottnek
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Anglican
Jurisdiction: Episcopal Diocese of Arizona
Posts: 5,121


I am Bibleman; putting 'the' back in the Ukraine


« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2012, 01:44:55 AM »

Thank you both.
Logged

I know a secret about a former Supreme Court Justice.  Can you guess what it is?

The greatest tragedy in the world is when a cigarette ends.

American Spirits - the eco-friendly cigarette.

Preston Robert Kinney (September 8th, 1997-August 14, 2011
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #29 on: January 24, 2012, 06:25:14 PM »

Alexandros Papadiamantis seems to be available only in "The Murderess" and various translations into German. Putting together the advice in the preceding posts, it looks as if I should keep an eye open for "The Brothers Karamazov" as my first trial of this sort of literature.

Thank you all for your suggestions.
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
Iconodule
Uranopolitan
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA (Diocese of Eastern Pennsylvania)
Posts: 7,048


"My god is greater."


« Reply #30 on: January 24, 2012, 09:53:40 PM »

Alexandros Papadiamantis seems to be available only in "The Murderess" and various translations into German.

Look for a copy of The Boundless Garden, a short story collection released a few years back. I'm not sure if it's still in print but copies should still be around. There's also this: http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Greek-Island-Alexandros-Papadiamantis/dp/0801848466
Logged

"A riddle or the cricket's cry
Is to doubt a fit reply." - William Blake
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,841


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #31 on: January 30, 2012, 05:55:41 AM »

I shall start keeping an eye out for the ones most recommended in charity shops, where they often appear and are on sale for less than a couple of quid

...until you actually want to buy them!
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
akimori makoto
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Non-heretical Christian
Jurisdiction: Fully-sik-hektic archdiocese of Australia, bro
Posts: 3,126

No-one bound by fleshly pleasures is worthy ...


« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2012, 03:13:43 AM »

I'm not sure how much he can really be called an "Orthodox novelist", perhaps more like a writer who happened to be Orthodox, but I really love Nikolai Gogol.

I agree with your characterisation but will say that The Greatcoat and Dead Souls both struck me (on their face) as having been written by a Christian. Did you think so too?
« Last Edit: January 31, 2012, 03:16:14 AM by akimori makoto » Logged

The Episcopallian road is easy and wide, for many go through it to find destruction. lol sorry channeling Isa.
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.106 seconds with 61 queries.