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Author Topic: local parish customs...  (Read 758 times) Average Rating: 0
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Seafra
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« on: January 08, 2012, 09:48:01 AM »

Hey so I attended a Serbian Church when I was in Kansas City, was invited by a member here, and witnessed a local custom that I fell in love with. Honestly I think it should be a normal part of every church. somewhere very near the beginning them men and women respectively, of course, would greet each other with a kiss saying "forgive me,brother, if I have sinned against you in any way. Pray for me" It was something that I truly admired and loved about this church, I was curious what some other parish customs you guys have experienced!
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Jonathan
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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2012, 01:20:18 PM »

In the Coptic tradition the kiss of peace is always done as well... It is an ancient part of the Liturgy that has fallen into disuse in some traditions.
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Seafra
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2012, 01:29:51 PM »

In the Coptic tradition the kiss of peace is always done as well... It is an ancient part of the Liturgy that has fallen into disuse in some traditions.
is that what was done here? they have a number of ethiopians and that may have led to its use.
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« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2012, 01:33:59 PM »

In the Coptic tradition the kiss of peace is always done as well... It is an ancient part of the Liturgy that has fallen into disuse in some traditions.
is that what was done here? they have a number of ethiopians and that may have led to its use.

It sounds like it.. The point of the kiss of peace is that we are all supposed to be at peace with one another when we enter the Liturgy, as the Holy Spirit comes down and unites us into the Body of Christ, and we must have peace to go forward and partake of the Body and Blood in love as a community. Whether this is expressed as saying "peace" or "forgive me" seems to have the same general meaning.. It is also possible it is a fusion of the kiss of peace with the general confession that Roman Catholics and Armenians have, but that seems much less likely as that would be foreign to the Serbian tradition, and what you are describing sounds shorter and more similar to the kiss of peace, which some EO parishes to try to revive as a practice...
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Seafra
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« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2012, 01:50:21 PM »

Cool!
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2012, 02:00:24 PM »

I can think of some local varations (e.g. kneeling vs. sitting vs. standing) but I don't think that's what you're asking about.  ... There is the custom, done by some, of touching the priest's vestments as he walks through the church with that which will eventually become the body and blood of Christ.
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« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2012, 02:06:50 PM »

I can think of some local varations (e.g. kneeling vs. sitting vs. standing) but I don't think that's what you're asking about.  ... There is the custom, done by some, of touching the priest's vestments as he walks through the church with that which will eventually become the body and blood of Christ.
an allusion to the woman touching Christs robes for healing? Beautiful considering the healing given in the Eucharist!
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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2012, 02:09:27 PM »

I can think of some local varations (e.g. kneeling vs. sitting vs. standing) but I don't think that's what you're asking about.  ... There is the custom, done by some, of touching the priest's vestments as he walks through the church with that which will eventually become the body and blood of Christ.

That is interesting. In the Coptic Church we touch the fringe at the bottom of the curtain to the sanctuary door, and kiss the curtain, like the women who touched the hem of Christ's garment. I suspect this is related to the association of the Curtain with Christ's flesh (the curtain separates the immaterial from the material, heaven in the holy of holies from earth. Christ past from the immaterial to creation when He took on flesh, and the curtain was rent when His flesh was torn, as the division between heaven and earth was ruptured).
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William
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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2012, 04:26:43 PM »

At my parish many people kneel and are blessed with the unconsecrated gifts during the Great Entrance.
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2012, 01:36:42 AM »

Other EO customs I've seen some follow: crossing yourself when the Theotokos is mentioned in the service, giving antidoran to visitors, crossing your arms when you go to communion (does everyone do this?), crossing yourself when the priest blesses you (while others--me included--were taught to not cross yourself in those instances)...
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« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2012, 01:39:14 AM »

Other EO customs I've seen some follow: crossing yourself when the Theotokos is mentioned in the service, giving antidoran to visitors, crossing your arms when you go to communion (does everyone do this?), crossing yourself when the priest blesses you (while others--me included--were taught to not cross yourself in those instances)...
i believe its mostly Russian churches that cross their arms in the line
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2012, 01:40:45 AM »

Other EO customs I've seen some follow: crossing yourself when the Theotokos is mentioned in the service, giving antidoran to visitors, crossing your arms when you go to communion (does everyone do this?), crossing yourself when the priest blesses you (while others--me included--were taught to not cross yourself in those instances)...
i believe its mostly Russian churches that cross their arms in the line

Ahh, ok, fwiw we also do it in the local Antiochian parish.

Also, on a side note, I'm not that far from you, I'm in Latrobe PA Smiley
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« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2012, 01:43:52 AM »

cool! yeah i just moved here haha, its a pretty nice area so far!
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« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2012, 01:55:38 AM »

Major customs from the Armenian tradition off the top of my head (forgive me if some of these are widely used in other churches):

1. Make the sign of the cross when the priest blesses the congregation
2. Touching ones hand to the ground when the deacons intone "Asdudzo Yergrbakestsouk" (Let us bow down to God)
3. Kissing the Gospel book if in the choir/deacon. Usually regular laity doesn't do this.
4. Making the sign of the Cross upon entering the church.
5. Here's an unusual one: we walk out the door backwards making the sign of the cross after service, so as not to "turn our back to God".
« Last Edit: January 16, 2012, 01:56:12 AM by Gisasargavak » Logged
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« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2012, 01:58:36 AM »

Btw, you can make the sign of the Cross at anytime, as the Spirit inspires you. Sometimes I find myself making the Sign of the Cross when most aren't. For example, today for some odd reason I made the Sign of the Cross at the mention of the Theotokos, which is not an Armenian practice. If someone criticizes you for it, tell them "lre, dzo" (be quiet). Smiley

By far, it is more important that these practice come from your heart and from the Spirit and out of love. If they are out of trying to "show off" or to look cool, it is better not to do them.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2012, 02:00:21 AM by Gisasargavak » Logged
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« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2012, 02:45:39 AM »

Major customs from the Armenian tradition off the top of my head (forgive me if some of these are widely used in other churches):

1. Make the sign of the cross when the priest blesses the congregation
2. Touching ones hand to the ground when the deacons intone "Asdudzo Yergrbakestsouk" (Let us bow down to God)
3. Kissing the Gospel book if in the choir/deacon. Usually regular laity doesn't do this.
4. Making the sign of the Cross upon entering the church.
5. Here's an unusual one: we walk out the door backwards making the sign of the cross after service, so as not to "turn our back to God".


Not sure what exactly you are describing for #3, but the other 4, including #5, are all what I've been taught in the Russian tradition.
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« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2012, 07:56:51 AM »

Major customs from the Armenian tradition off the top of my head (forgive me if some of these are widely used in other churches):

1. Make the sign of the cross when the priest blesses the congregation
2. Touching ones hand to the ground when the deacons intone "Asdudzo Yergrbakestsouk" (Let us bow down to God)
3. Kissing the Gospel book if in the choir/deacon. Usually regular laity doesn't do this.
4. Making the sign of the Cross upon entering the church.
5. Here's an unusual one: we walk out the door backwards making the sign of the cross after service, so as not to "turn our back to God".


Not sure what exactly you are describing for #3, but the other 4, including #5, are all what I've been taught in the Russian tradition.

Maybe he means that the deacons and the choir have the opportunity to reference the Gospel book during the liturgy? I know at my parish, we go up to kiss the book during orthros.
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« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2012, 10:21:45 AM »

I mean that when you walk in the church, usually you should kiss the Gospel book which is on the bema and say the Our Father. Usually the regular parishoners don't do this, as they don't want to walk in the chancel to get to it. Everyone has the opportunity to kiss the Gospel at the end of the Liturgy when the priest holds the Gospel up in the nave.
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